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Lavandula angustifolia
Common Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Lavandula
Species: L. angustifolia
Binomial name
Lavandula angustifolia
Mill.[1]
Synonyms

Lavandula angustifolia (also Lavandula spica or Lavandula vera; common lavender, true lavender, or English lavender (though not native to England); formerly L. officinalis) is a flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae, native to the western Mediterranean region, primarily in the Pyrenees and other mountains in northern Spain.

Contents

Growth

It is a strongly aromatic shrub growing to 1–2 m tall. The leaves are evergreen, 2–6 cm long and 4–6 mm broad. The flowers are pinkish-purple (lavender-coloured), produced on spikes 2–8 cm long at the top of slender, leafless stems 10–30 cm long.

Etymology

The species name angustifolia is Latin for "narrow leaf".

Cultivation

English lavender is commonly grown as an ornamental plant. It is popular for its colourful flowers, its fragrance and its ability to survive with low water consumption. It does not grow well in continuously damp soil. It is fairly tolerant of low temperatures, generally considered hardy to USDA zone 5.[2]

Uses

In addition to its use as an ornamental plant, the flowers and leaves are also used as an herbal medicine, either in the form of lavender oil or as an herbal tea. The flowers are also used as a culinary herb, most often as part of the French herb blend called herbes de Provence.

Lavender essential oil, when diluted with a carrier oil, is commonly used as a relaxant with massage therapy. Products for home use including lotions, eye pillows—including lavender flowers or the essential oil itself—bath oils, etc. are also used to induce relaxation.

Dried lavender flowers and lavender essential oil are also used as a prevention against clothing moths, which do not like their scent.

Subspecies

  • Lavandula angustifolia angustifolia[1]
  • Lavandula angustifolia pyrenaica[1]

References

External links

Two forms in a garden planting

See also

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Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Lavandula angustifolia

Taxonavigation

Classification System: APG II (down to family level)

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiospermae
Cladus: Eudicots
Cladus: core eudicots
Cladus: Asterids
Cladus: Euasterids I
Ordo: Lamiales
Familia: Lamiaceae
Subfamilia: Nepetoideae
Tribus: Lavanduleae
Genus: Lavandula
Species: L. angustifolia

Name

Lavandula angustifolia Mill.

References

  • Gard. dict. ed. 8: Lavandula no. 2. 1768
  • USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN) [Online Database]. [1]

Vernacular names

Česky: Levandule lékařská
Русский: Лаванда узколистная
Wikimedia Commons For more multimedia, look at Lavandula angustifolia on Wikimedia Commons.

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