The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Lee Slater Overman

Lee Slater Overman: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Lee Slater Overman

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lee Slater Overman

Lee Slater Overman (3 January 1854 – 12 December 1930) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1903 and 1930. He was born in Salisbury, N.C., the son of William H. and Mary E. Slater Overman. He attended Trinity College (now Duke University), Class of 1874, where he was a member of the Chi Phi Fraternity.

In 1914, Overman became the first U.S. senator from North Carolina to be elected by popular vote, having been previously appointed to the seat by the state legislature in 1902 and again in 1909.

He wrote and sponsored the Overman Act of 1918, which gave President Woodrow Wilson extraordinary powers to coordinate government agencies in wartime. Overman chaired a Senate committee after World War I which many see as a precursor to the House UnAmerican Activities Committee of the Fifties.

In 1922, Overman was one of the leaders of a 1 hour, 45 minute filibuster that helped defeat the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill. Among his claims was that the bill was a partisan attempt to solidify the Republican hold on the northern black vote, that the bill had been written by a black person, and that ignorant black people in the South would interpret the bill as permission to "commit the foulest of outrages." [1]

In World War II the United States liberty ship SS Lee S. Overman was named in his honor.

Overman Committee

Overman chaired the Overman Committee, a subcommittee that investigated foreign propaganda and Bolshevism in the United States during the first Red Scare.

References

  1. ^ "Filibuster Kills Anti-Lynching Bill", New York Times, December 3, 1922
United States Senate
Preceded by
Jeter Connelly Pritchard
United States Senator (Class 3) from North Carolina
1903–1930
Served alongside: Furnifold McLendel Simmons
Succeeded by
Cameron A. Morrison

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message