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In baseball, a baserunner is said to be left on base (abbreviated LOB) when the half-inning ends, he has not scored, and he has not been put out. This is to include a batter-runner who has hit into a fielder's choice, causing another runner to be put out as the 3rd out.[1]

When the batter hits a fair ball, his plate appearance ends and he becomes a runner. Team LOB totals are commonly reported in a baseball box score. Individual LOB statistics can also be tracked.

A related statistic is Left On Base in Scoring Position, which includes only those LOB where the runner was occupying second or third base. Yet another related statistic is Left On Base in Scoring Position with Less Than Two Out. The intention of these statistics is to measure the tendency of a team or player to waste an opportunity to score.

Team LOB is used in "proving" a box score. The number of a team's plate appearances is to equal the sum of that team's runs, that team's LOB, and the opposing team's putouts. In other words, every batter who completes a plate appearance is accounted for by a run scored or by being put out or by being LOB.

"Stranded" is sometimes used to mean LOB.

There is an individual LOB category as well as a Team LOB category. An individual gets LOB stats no matter the outs in the inning. Team LOB, however, counts only those left standing on the bases when the third out of an inning occurs.

See also

References

  1. ^ Baseball Digest (Lakeside Publishing) 39 (4). April 1980. ISSN 0005-609X.  


In baseball, a baserunner is said to be left on base (abbreviated LOB) when the half-inning ends, he has not scored, and he has not been put out. This is to include a batter-runner who has hit into a fielder's choice, causing another runner to be put out as the 3rd out.[1]

When the batter hits a fair ball, his plate appearance ends and he becomes a runner. Team LOB totals are commonly reported in a baseball box score. Individual LOB statistics can also be tracked.

A related statistic is Left On Base in Scoring Position, which includes only those LOB where the runner was occupying second or third base. Yet another related statistic is Left On Base in Scoring Position with Less Than Two Out. The intention of these statistics is to measure the tendency of a team or player to waste an opportunity to score.

Team LOB is used in "proving" a box score. The number of a team's plate appearances is to equal the sum of that team's runs, that team's LOB, and the opposing team's putouts. In other words, every batter who completes a plate appearance is accounted for by a run scored or by being put out or by being LOB.

"Stranded" is sometimes used to mean LOB.

There is an individual LOB category as well as a Team LOB category. An individual accumulates LOB stats no matter how many outs in the inning. Team LOB, however, counts only those left standing on the bases when the third out of an inning occurs. Accordingly, adding together the individual LOB for all players will usually exceed team LOB.

See also

References

  1. ^ Baseball Digest (Lakeside Publishing) 39 (4). April 1980. ISSN 0005-609X. 








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