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City of Lemoore
—  City  —
Location in Kings County and the state of California
Coordinates: 36°18′03″N 119°46′58″W / 36.30083°N 119.78278°W / 36.30083; -119.78278Coordinates: 36°18′03″N 119°46′58″W / 36.30083°N 119.78278°W / 36.30083; -119.78278
Country United States
State California
County Kings
Area
 - Total 8.5 sq mi (21.9 km2)
 - Land 8.5 sq mi (21.9 km2)
 - Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation [1] 230 ft (70 m)
Population (2009)
 - Total 24,818
 Density 2,319.1/sq mi (900.1/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 93245-93246
Area code(s) 559
FIPS code 06-41152
GNIS feature ID 1660905

Lemoore (formerly, La Tache and Lee Moore's)[1] is a city in Kings County, California, United States. Lemoore is located 7.5 miles (12 km) west-southwest of Hanford,[2] at an elevation of 230 feet (70 m).[1]It is part of the HanfordCorcoran Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 19,712 at the 2000 census. However, the California Department of Finance estimates that the population had grown to 24,818 as of January 1, 2009.

Contents

Geography

Lemoore is located at 36°18′03″N 119°46′58″W / 36.30083°N 119.78278°W / 36.30083; -119.78278.[1]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.4 square miles (21.9 km²), all of it land.

Culture

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Attractions

The Sarah A. Mooney Memorial Museum is a Victorian house museum that was built in 1893 by Aaron and Sarah Mooney. The home is decorated in the Victorian period, with many of the pieces in the house donated by local families.

Media

The city had a local paper called The Lemoore Advance.

KGAR, 93.3 fm, is a low power LPFM radio station ran and operated by Lemoore High School Students on the campus of Lemoore High School.

History

Dr. Lovern Lee Moore first made his home in what was western Tulare County, California -- now the City of Lemoore -- in April, 1871. It was near Tulare Lake, then the largest body of water in central California. This was a stretch of vast virgin land on which sheep, horses and wild animals had grazed but had never been cultivated before American pioneers from eastern states had come to California.

By the time Dr. Moore arrived, scores of individual farms dotted the landscape. The soil was rich and productive as it had been brought down and deposited for centuries from the high Sierras by the Kings River. Wells were easy to dig, as the water level wets unusually high. So water was plentiful for irrigation from shallow wells farm families installed. Raising of sheep and grains were principal concerns of farmers in the area.

However, the pioneers were somewhat isolated, since they had to drive by horse as far as six miles northeast to Grangeville settlement, to get mail or newspapers. It was even farther to Kingston for other supplies. Hanford was not yet founded until later in 1877. Even the area was called by various names, believed to be of Indian origin, such as Latache, Tailholt, or just, in English, the Lake District.

Dr. Lee Moore proved to be a man of vision. He decided to knit together the scores of surrounding farm families, to secure a post office, and some local center for conducting business which could be hastened by direct means of communicating with the outside world. He must also have had the hope of attracting the railroad, which was then being planned but was not built until six years later.

The first steps he took to organize a community began in early 1872, when he surveyed a 10-acre subdivision in what is now the land immediately west of the present Lemoore High School. In August 1872 he had established the first real estate development in this district and had laid out and named the streets after other pioneer families. In the summer of 1872 land auctions were held and lots went to the highest bidder. Prices ranged from $75 to $150 per lot. One business lot was sold for $600, rated as a very high price, considering the value of the dollar in 1872. Dr. Moore's home was believed to be situated where the grammar school playground on Bush Street is now located.

The year 1872 was a busy one for the inhabitants. In addition to sales at the subdivision and putting in of streets, new buildings for homes and businesses began to arise. This was the start of a real community, but it still lacked a school, a definitely accepted name, and a post office.

All these developed in the next eventful year of 1873. Dr. Moore had presented a signed petition to the U.S. Post Office Department in distant Washington for a post office in the new town in 1872, but his petition was not granted until 1873.

At that time it was common custom to name communities after their founders or some prominent person of the day. The naming of Hanford and Porterville are examples of this common practice.

The Lemoore post office first opened in 1875.[2]

For some reason the U.S. Post Office objected to the name "Latache," so it combined the founder's name by omitting one letter "e" and called the new post office Lemoore after Lee Moore. In that way the new community received its name.

In the same year, 1873, a Mr. Armstrong donated two acres of land for the first school building in Lemoore. It was a frame structure 18 by 30 feet, completed and dedicated at a country dance held in December 1873.

The railroad came to what is now Kings County in 1877. At that date Grangeville was the largest community in the entire area. After some dispute with its residents, rail officials decided to by-pass that settlement and went through Hanford. Lemoore, by that time had shown healthy growth. It could have been through the foresight of Dr. Moore in setting a head-start in '72 which attracted the rail route to his budding community. The line was put through Lemoore in 1877 parallel to Front Street, now called E Street.

This re-directed the business growth of the town toward the railroad station from where Dr. Moore first encouraged residence and business activity. It eventually made E (Front Street) and D Streets the main business avenues of the community.

After 25 years of service to the Lemoore area, Dr. Lee Moore died on September 11, 1898. The number of new residents he had helped bring into the world numbered in the thousands.

In 1883 the town then had a flouring mill of 200 barrels daily capacity. It was an important shipping point for wheat and wool, and not long after wards became a center for fruit, but in its early period many fires retarded its growth.

Many of the early settlers of the Lemoore District were cultured people, and Lemoore attained a reputation for literary and musical accomplishments unmatched by many pioneer towns. There was an early literary society that had a long and noteworthy existence.

In 1893 Tulare County, by act of the State Legislature, was split into two areas. Western Tulare County became what is now Kings County. In creating the new County of Kings there was keen competition between Hanford and Lemoore as to which would become the county seat. By that time Hanford's population had exceeded Lemoore's and the addition of the Santa Fe Railroad's main line through Hanford gave it the advantage of two rail lines instead of one. The result was the construction of the County Courthouse in that city.

Lemoore became an incorporated city on 11 July 1900, which opened a new era for the community, with government by an elected City Council. Lemoore residents have always taken a keen interest in local political activities.

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 21,900 people, 6,450 households, and 4,927 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,332.3 people per square mile (900.7/km²). There were 6,823 housing units at an average density of 807.3/sq mi (311.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.29% White, 7.28% African American, 1.59% Native American, 8.37% Asian, 0.33% Pacific Islander, 17.35% from other races, and 5.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 30.50% of the population.

There were 6,450 households out of which 48.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.0% were married couples living together, 15.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.06 and the average family size was 3.46.

In the city the population was spread out with 34.6% under the age of 18, 11.2% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 16.6% from 45 to 64, and 6.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females there were 98.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $40,314, and the median income for a family was $44,006. Males had a median income of $34,726 versus $25,759 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,876. About 11.4% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 11.3% of those age 65 or over. The unemployment rate in December 2009 was 14.5%[4]

Government

In the state legislature Lemoore is located in the 16th Senate District, represented by Democrat Dean Florez, and in the 30th Assembly District, represented by Republican Danny Gilmore. Federally, Lemoore is located in California's 20th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of D +5[5] and is represented by Democrat Jim Costa.

Education

The Lemoore Union Elementary School District provides kindergarten through eighth grade education for most of the city. It operates the following elementary and junior high schools:[6]

  • Cinnamon Elementary
  • P.W. Engvall Elementary
  • Lemoore Elementary
  • Meadow Lane Elementary
  • Liberty Middle School
  • University Charter School

The Central Union School District serves much of the outlying parts of Lemoore and provides kindergarten through eighth grade education. It operates the following elementary schools:[7]

  • Akers Elementary
  • Neutra Elementary
  • Central Union Elementary School

The Island Union Elementary School District serves the west side of Lemoore and operates Island Elementary School which has grades kindergarten through eighth.[8]

The Lemoore Union High School District provides public secondary education. It operates the following schools:[9]

  • Lemoore Union High School
  • Donald C. Jamison High School
  • Lemoore Middle College High School
  • Gundacker Community Day School
  • Yokuts High School

West Hills College is a community college based in Coalinga, California that currently operates a campus in Lemoore.[10]

Private Schools in Lemoore include:

  • Kings Christian School - pre-kindergarten through high school.[11]
  • Mary Immaculate Queen School - kindergarten through eighth grade.[12]

Notable residents

References

  1. ^ a b c d U.S. Geological Survey Geographical Names Information System: Lemoore, California
  2. ^ a b Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 1061. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ [www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov] accessed January 23, 2010
  5. ^ "Will Gerrymandered Districts Stem the Wave of Voter Unrest?". Campaign Legal Center Blog. http://www.clcblog.org/blog_item-85.html. Retrieved 2007-10-20. 
  6. ^ Lemoore Union Elementary School District, Lemoore CA
  7. ^ Central Union School District
  8. ^ Island Union Elementary - Home
  9. ^ Lemoore Union High School District
  10. ^ West Hills College Lemoore
  11. ^ Home: Kings Christian School, Lemoore CA
  12. ^ Web File Manager

External links


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