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Leonardo da Vinci
Self-portrait in red chalk, circa 1512 to 1515.[nb 1]
Birth name Leonardo di Ser Piero
Born April 15, 1452(1452-04-15)
Vinci, Florence, in present-day Italy
Died May 2, 1519 (aged 67)
Amboise, Touraine (in present-day Indre-et-Loire, France)
Nationality Italian
Field Many and diverse fields of arts and sciences
Movement High Renaissance
Works Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, The Vitruvian Man
.Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (About this sound pronunciation ), (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519), was an Italian polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, botanist and writer.^ It is Leonardo's contribution as an engineer and scientist, that have established him as a visionary whose ideas, although sometimes over-exuberant, were nonetheless vastly ahead of his own time.
  • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

^ The mystery and legend surrounding Leonardo da Vinci probably comes from a combination of factors.
  • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

^ LEONARDO DA VINCI Webring .
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

.Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the Renaissance man, a man whose unquenchable curiosity was equaled only by his powers of invention.^ Leonardo Da Vinci lived from 1452 - 1519 and is the very definition of the words, "Renaissance Man".
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - Lulu.com 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.lulu.com [Source type: General]

^ "Early Jews believed that the Holy of Holies in Solomon's Temple housed not only God but also His powerful female equal, Shekinah."
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Leonardo has been described as the man who "wouldn't take Yes for an answer."
  • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

[1] .He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived.^ What made this illegitimate son of a notary and a peasant girl grow to become one of the world's most famous artists and a scientist who was way "ahead of his time"?
  • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

^ After all, when one of the most popular books of all time claims that the Bible is merely a human document and that Jesus was only human, Christians rightly regard this as a danger to their own faith and to that of others.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ "General revelation" refers to revelation that is available to all persons of all times.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

[2] .According to art historian Helen Gardner, the scope and depth of his interests were without precedent and "his mind and personality seem to us superhuman, the man himself mysterious and remote".[1] Marco Rosci points out, however, that while there is much speculation about Leonardo, his vision of the world is essentially logical rather than mysterious, and that the empirical methods he employed were unusual for his time.^ Giorgio Vasari, the first ever Art Historian, related that Leonardo "caused continuous doubts for the master who taught him and often confounded him."
  • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

^ There is no clear hard-core evidence that specifically states yes, however, if one goes over the material by Leonardo and his contemporaries one can cull out some rather interesting facts that attest to the fact that YES his machines did work and Leonardo did fly .
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I was a student at the time who, when taking photographs, was always careful to find out what the rules were and, if there was a steward in the room I would always double check that I was able to take a photo 'sans flash' - simple french but it seemed to work!!
  • Jonathan Jones: Tourist snappers are killing the Mona Lisa | Art and design | guardian.co.uk 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

[3]
.Born the illegitimate son of a notary, Piero da Vinci, and a peasant woman, Caterina, at Vinci in the region of Florence, Leonardo was educated in the studio of the renowned Florentine painter, Verrocchio.^ What made this illegitimate son of a notary and a peasant girl grow to become one of the world's most famous artists and a scientist who was way "ahead of his time"?
  • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Much of his earlier working life was spent in the service of Ludovico il Moro in Milan.^ [Footnote: _Duchessa di Milano_, Beatrice d'Este, wife of Ludovico il Moro to whom she was married, in 1491.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

.He later worked in Rome, Bologna and Venice and spent his last years in France, at the home awarded him by Francis I.^ By the way, what fool believes that Leonardo Da Vinci, 1519 years later, alone possesses some secret knowledge about the Last Supper?
  • The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC biblebelievers.com [Source type: Original source]

Leonardo was and is renowned[2] primarily as a painter. .Two of his works, the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, are the most famous, most reproduced and most parodied portrait and religious paintings of all time, respectively, their fame approached only by Michelangelo's Creation of Adam.^ What made this illegitimate son of a notary and a peasant girl grow to become one of the world's most famous artists and a scientist who was way "ahead of his time"?
  • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

^ While it is true that John looks effeminate in The Last Supper, this is quite in keeping with other paintings by this homosexual artist.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ All the ills that are or ever were, if they could be set to work by him, would not satisfy the desires of his iniquitous soul; and I could not in any length of time describe his nature to you, but I conclude...
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[1] .Leonardo's drawing of the Vitruvian Man is also regarded as a cultural icon,[4] being reproduced on everything from the Euro to text books to t-shirts.^ The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) .
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) .
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

Perhaps fifteen of his paintings survive, the small number due to his constant, and frequently disastrous, experimentation with new techniques, and his chronic procrastination.[nb .2] Nevertheless, these few works, together with his notebooks, which contain drawings, scientific diagrams, and his thoughts on the nature of painting, comprise a contribution to later generations of artists only rivalled by that of his contemporary, Michelangelo.^ Italian Renaissance drawings at the British Museum: from Leonardo to Lorenzo di Credi 15 Jul 2009: Preview a new exhibition of Italian Renaissance drawings at the British Museum, where drawings by Michelangelo and Leonardo, so delicate that they are only shown once in a generation, will be on display .
  • Jonathan Jones: Tourist snappers are killing the Mona Lisa | Art and design | guardian.co.uk 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

^ The only apostle that later leaves is Judas Iscariot, but Judas is in the painting.
  • The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC biblebelievers.com [Source type: Original source]

Leonardo is revered[2] for his technological ingenuity. He conceptualised a helicopter, a tank, concentrated solar power, a calculator,[5] the double hull and outlined a rudimentary theory of plate tectonics. Relatively few of his designs were constructed or were even feasible during his lifetime,[nb 3] but some of his smaller inventions, such as an automated bobbin winder and a machine for testing the tensile strength of wire, entered the world of manufacturing unheralded.[nb 4] As a scientist, he greatly advanced the state of knowledge in the fields of anatomy, civil engineering, optics, and hydrodynamics.[6]

Contents

Life

Childhood, 1452–1466

Photo of a building of rough stone with small windows, surrounded by olive trees.
Leonardo's childhood home in Anchiano.
Pen drawing of a landscape with mountains, a river in a deep valley, and a small castle.
Leonardo's earliest known drawing, the Arno Valley, (1473) - Uffizi
.Leonardo was born on April 15, 1452, "at the third hour of the night"[nb 5] in the Tuscan hill town of Vinci, in the lower valley of the Arno River in the territory of Florence.^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Via Carlo Fea 00161, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Via Bartolomeo Eustachio 00161, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[8] .He was the illegitimate son of Messer Piero Fruosino di Antonio da Vinci, a Florentine notary, and Caterina, a peasant.^ What made this illegitimate son of a notary and a peasant girl grow to become one of the world's most famous artists and a scientist who was way "ahead of his time"?
  • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Pierino da Vinci the sculptor (about 1520-1554) was the son of Bartolommeo, the fifth of these children.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[7][9][nb 6] Leonardo had no surname in the modern sense, "da Vinci" simply meaning "of Vinci": his full birth name was "Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci", meaning "Leonardo, (son) of (Mes)ser Piero from Vinci".[8]
.Little is known about Leonardo's early life.^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The fact that the geographical position is so care- fully determined by Leonardo seems to prove that it was a place of no great importance and little known.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

.He spent his first five years in the hamlet of Anchiano, then lived in the household of his father, grandparents and uncle, Francesco, in the small town of Vinci.^ Francesco Vinci, Leonardo's uncle, died--as Amoretti tells us--in the winter of l5l0-11 (or according to Uzielli in 1506?
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Actually I was born the year the song "Mona Lisa" by Nat King Cole was popular in the small town where I was born ...
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

.His father had married a sixteen-year-old girl named Albiera, who loved Leonardo but died young.^ If you are referring to the Mona Lisa project, the ‘pregnant teenage girl’ in question is a 20 year old college student named Lila Rose that is going under cover as a pregnant teenager.
  • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

^ Such was the contrast between Lorenzo and Giuliano di Medici, who stood with Leonardo a few feet away from the Great Bird.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the year of Leonardo's birth Ser Piero married Albiera di Giovanni Amadoci, and after her death at the age of thirty eight he again married, Francesca, daughter of Ser Giovanni Lanfredi, then only fifteen.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[10] .When Leonardo was sixteen his father married again, twenty-year-old Francesca Lanfredini.^ But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years....
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In the year of Leonardo's birth Ser Piero married Albiera di Giovanni Amadoci, and after her death at the age of thirty eight he again married, Francesca, daughter of Ser Giovanni Lanfredi, then only fifteen.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

.It was not until his third and fourth marriages that Ser Piero produced legitimate heirs.^ Ser Piero married for the third time Lucrezia di Guglielmo Cortigiani by whom he had six children: Margherita (b.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[11] .In later life, Leonardo only recorded two childhood incidents.^ Leonardo divides a circle into two diamond shapes for his later work on the squaring of the circle.

^ Albert Einstein There are only two ways to live your life.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But Leonardo was concerned only with Niccolo, for two brawny inquisitore were lifting him into the cart.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

One, which he regarded as an omen, was when a kite dropped from the sky and hovered over his cradle, its tail feathers brushing his face.[12] The second occurred while exploring in the mountains. .He discovered a cave and was both terrified that some great monster might lurk there, and driven by curiosity to find out what was inside.^ Excellent work Mona,Sacrificiall library visit's do pay off....Nice pup's and some great find's.HH!!
  • Mona Lisa is smiling! New finds....1877 dime! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC forum.treasurenet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But I'd like to find out why Da Vinchi offends some Christians so.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Lisa that's just awesome..great detective work and congrats on some great finds, especially the coinage.
  • Mona Lisa is smiling! New finds....1877 dime! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC forum.treasurenet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[10]
.Leonardo's early life has been the subject of historical conjecture.^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[13] Vasari, the 16th-century biographer of Renaissance painters tells of how a local peasant made himself a round shield and requested that Ser Piero have it painted for him. .Leonardo responded with a painting of monster spitting fire which was so terrifying that Ser Piero sold it to a Florentine art dealer, who sold it to the Duke of Milan.^ [Footnote 19: In April, 1498, Leonardo was engaged in painting the Saletta Nigra of the Castello at Milan.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

Meanwhile, having made a profit, Ser Piero bought a shield decorated with a heart pierced by an arrow, which he gave to the peasant.[14]
Painting showing Jesus, naked except for a loin-cloth, standing in a shallow stream in a rocky landscape, while to the right, John the Baptist, identifiable by the cross that he carries, tips water over Jesus' head. Two angels kneel at the left. Above Jesus are the hands of God, and a dove descending.
The Baptism of Christ (1472–1475)—Uffizi, by Verrocchio and Leonardo

Verrocchio's workshop, 1466–1476

.In 1466, at the age of fourteen, Leonardo was apprenticed to the artist Andrea di Cione, known as Verrocchio whose workshop was "one of the finest in Florence".[15] Other famous painters apprenticed or associated with the workshop include Domenico Ghirlandaio, Perugino, Botticelli, and Lorenzo di Credi.^ The _Diodario_ is not directly addressed--the person addressed indeed is not known--and it seems to me highly probable that it was written to some other patron and friend whose name and position are not mentioned.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[10][16] .Leonardo would have been exposed to both theoretical training and a vast range of technical skills[17] including drafting, chemistry, metallurgy, metal working, plaster casting, leather working, mechanics and carpentry as well as the artistic skills of drawing, painting, sculpting and modelling.^ It would seem from the text that Leonardo intended to have instructions in painting on paper.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Although his flying machine had workedor would have worked successfully, if he, Leonardo, had taken it into the airhe had another idea for a great bird.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

[18][nb 7]
Much of the painted production of Verrocchio's workshop was done by his employees. .According to Vasari, Leonardo collaborated with Verrocchio on his Baptism of Christ, painting the young angel holding Jesus's robe in a manner that was so far superior to his master's that Verrocchio put down his brush and never painted again.^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Unlike Paul and Barnabas, Jesus never sought to correct His followers when they bowed down and worshipped Him.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

[19] This is probably an exaggeration. .On close examination, the painting reveals much that has been painted or touched up over the tempera using the new technique of oil paint, the landscape, the rocks that can be seen through the brown mountain stream and much of the figure of Jesus bearing witness to the hand of Leonardo.^ Yet another evidence Dan Brown sets forth for Jesus' alleged marriage is Leonardo Da Vinci's painting of The Last Supper.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The medal struck in honour of the event bears the words MAG. IVLIAN. MEDICES. Leonardo too uses the style "Magnifico", in his letter.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But on close examination no one can doubt that these documents, with the accompanying sketches, are the work of Leonardo's own hand.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[20]
.Leonardo himself may have been the model for two works by Verrocchio, including the bronze statue of David in the Bargello, and the Archangel Michael in Tobias and the Angel.^ M. Ravaisson avails himself of this note to prove his hypothesis that Leonardo paid two visits to France.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no capable man,--[33] and you may believe me,--except Leonardo the Florentine, who is making the equestrian statue in bronze of the Duke Francesco and who has no need to bring himself into notice, because he has work for all his life time; and I doubt, whether being so great a work, he will ever finish it [34].
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[9]
.By 1472, at the age of twenty, Leonardo qualified as a master in the Guild of St Luke, the guild of artists and doctors of medicine,[nb 8] but even after his father set him up in his own workshop, his attachment to Verrocchio was such that he continued to collaborate with him.^ We have taken her to doctor appointments and to get her car fixed, and we have picked things up for her when she couldn’t get to the store even though she lives 20 miles out of our way.
  • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

[10] Leonardo's earliest known dated work is a drawing in pen and ink of the Arno valley, drawn on August 5, 1473.[nb 9][16]

Professional life, 1476–1513

An unfinished painting showing the Virgin Mary and Christ Child surrounded by many figures who are all crowding to look at the baby. Behind the figures is a distant landscape and a large ruined building. <a name=.More people are coming, in the distance."^ I look forward to more pics soon, I see better finds coming out of here, and I see dead people, but thats not important right now.....
  • Mona Lisa is smiling! New finds....1877 dime! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC forum.treasurenet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

src="http://images-mediawiki-sites.thefullwiki.org/00/1/5/6/24097682710651279.jpg" width="250" height="241" class="thumbimage" />
.Florentine court records of 1476 show that Leonardo and three other young men were charged with sodomy, and acquitted.^ But then Leonardo heard horses galloping through the streets, heard men's voices calling to each other.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

[9] .[nb 10] From that date until 1478 there is no record of his work or even of his whereabouts,[21] In 1478 he left Verroccio's studio and was no longer resident at his father's house.^ Most of these school houses no longer exist and the sites are usually in plowed fields.
  • Mona Lisa is smiling! New finds....1877 dime! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC forum.treasurenet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ QueenVII says – reply to this 21 There is no way ANYONE could damage the Mona Lisa… I have seen the bitch and she is on LOCK DOWN!!!!
  • Perez Hilton: Woman Loses Her Mind & Attacks The Mona Lisa!!! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC perezhilton.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Here what the foundation looked like on the 1879 map....and on the 1909 USGS map it's no longer there.
  • Mona Lisa is smiling! New finds....1877 dime! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC forum.treasurenet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.One writer, the "Anonimo" Gaddiano claims that in 1480 he was living with the Medici and working in the garden of the Piazza San Marco in Florence.^ Piazza San Marco .
  • Profile Books :: The Da Vinci Notebooks :: Leonardo da Vinci 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.profilebooks.com [Source type: General]

[9] In January 1478 he received his first independent commission, to paint an altarpiece in 1478 for the Chapel of St Bernard in the Palazzo Vecchioand The Adoration of the Magi in March 1481 for the Monks of San Donato a Scopeto.[22] Neither important commission was completed, the second being interrupted when Leonardo went to Milan.
.In 1482 Leonardo, who according to Vasari was a most talented musician,[23] created a silver lyre in the shape of a horse's head.^ Niccolo looked to Leonardo, who could only shake his head.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

.Lorenzo de’ Medici sent Leonardo, bearing the lyre as a gift, to Milan, to secure peace with Ludovico il Moro, Duke of Milan.^ But Lorenzo carried his shield, which contained "Il Libro," the huge Medici diamond reputed to be worth 2,500 ducats.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nor can there be any doubt that they were addressed to Leonardo's patron at the time: Giuliano de' Medici, third son of Lorenzo the Magnificent and brother of Pope Leo X (born 1478).
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ [Footnote: _Duchessa di Milano_, Beatrice d'Este, wife of Ludovico il Moro to whom she was married, in 1491.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[24] .At this time Leonardo wrote an often-quoted letter to Ludovico, describing the many marvellous and diverse things that he could achieve in the field of engineering and informing the Lord that he could also paint.^ Having often made you, by my letters, acquainted with the things which have happened, I think I ought not to be silent as to the events of the last few days, which--[2]...
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Lord and obtain such letters that you could never refuse [to give] him the work.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[16][25]
.Leonardo continued work in Milan between 1482 and 1499. He was commissioned to paint the Virgin of the Rocks for the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception, and The Last Supper for the monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie.^ While it is true that John looks effeminate in The Last Supper, this is quite in keeping with other paintings by this homosexual artist.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet another evidence Dan Brown sets forth for Jesus' alleged marriage is Leonardo Da Vinci's painting of The Last Supper.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The whores were out in full regalia, having left their district which lay between Santa Giovanni and Santa Maria Maggiore; they worked their way through the crowds, as did the cutpurses and pickpockets, the children of Firenze's streets.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

[26] .While living in Milan between 1493 and 1495 Leonardo listed a woman called Caterina among his dependents in his taxation documents.^ A considerable proportion of these notes belong to the period between 1490 and 1500, when Leonardo was living at Milan under the patronage of Lodovico il Moro, a time concerning which we have otherwise only very scanty information.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Leonardo's life in Milan between 1489 and 1500 must have been comparatively uneventful.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ We have no information as to Leonardo's history between 1482 and 1486; it cannot be proved that he was either in Milan or in Florence.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

When she died in 1495, the list of funeral expenditure suggests that she was his mother.[27]
He worked on many different projects for Ludovico, including the preparation of floats and pageants for special occasions, designs for a dome for Milan Cathedral and a model for a huge equestrian monument to Francesco Sforza, Ludovico's predecessor. Seventy tons of bronze were set aside for casting it. The monument remained unfinished for several years, which was not unusual for Leonardo. In 1492 the clay model of the horse was completed. It surpassed in size the only two large equestrian statues of the Renaissance, Donatello's statue of Gattemelata in Padua and Verrocchio's Bartolomeo Colleoni in Venice, and became known as the "Gran Cavallo".[16][nb 11]
A page with two drawings of a war-horse, one from the side, and the other showing the chest and right leg.
Study of horse from Leonardo's journals – Royal Library, Windsor Castle
Leonardo began making detailed plans for its casting,[16] however, Michelangelo rudely implied that Leonardo was unable to cast it.[10] In November 1494 Ludovico gave the bronze to be used for cannons to defend the city from invasion by Charles VIII.[16]
At the start of the Second Italian War in 1499, the invading French troops used the life-size clay model for the "Gran Cavallo" for target practice. With Ludovico Sforza overthrown, Leonardo, with his assistant Salai and friend, the mathematician Luca Pacioli, fled Milan for Venice,[28] where he was employed as a military architect and engineer, devising methods to defend the city from naval attack.[10]
On his return to Florence in 1500, he and his household were guests of the Servite monks at the monastery of Santissima Annunziata and were provided with a workshop where, according to Vasari, Leonardo created the cartoon of The Virgin and Child with St. Anne and St. John the Baptist, a work that won such admiration that "men and women, young and old" flocked to see it "as if they were attending a great festival".[29][nb 12] In 1502 Leonardo entered the service of Cesare Borgia, the son of Pope Alexander VI, acting as a military architect and engineer and travelling throughout Italy with his patron.[28] .He returned to Florence where he rejoined the Guild of St Luke on October 18, 1503, and spent two years designing and painting a great mural of The Battle of Anghiari for the Signoria,[28] with Michelangelo designing its companion piece, The Battle of Cascina.^ Always great for special occasion--our daughter and son in law in town for once a year (or two year) visit--just right for food, wine and conversation.
  • Mona Lisa Fondue Restaurant Reviews - Rated by OpenTable Diners 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC reviews.opentable.com [Source type: General]

[nb 13] In Florence in 1504, he was part of a committee formed to relocate, against the artist's will, Michelangelo's statue of David.[33]
In 1506 he returned to Milan. .Many of Leonardo's most prominent pupils or followers in painting either knew or worked with him in Milan,[10] including Bernardino Luini, Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio and Marco D'Oggione.^ The film follows the novel pretty closely, even including some of the most godawful passages of dialogue, but, fortunately for the audience, time constraints have led Goldsman to chip away at many of Brown’s longueurs.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Leonardo shouted "stop" and rushed toward him, but Tista threw himself over the crest before either Leonardo or Niccolo could stop him.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles d'Amboise, Marechal de Chaumont, was Governor of Milan under Louis XII. Leonardo was in personal communication with him so early as in 1503.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[nb .14] However, he did not stay in Milan for long because his father had died in 1504, and in 1507 he was back in Florence trying to sort out problems with his brothers over his father's estate.^ However, because many of the earliest church fathers believed in a thousand–year reign of Christ too, this objection was eventually seen as being without merit.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

By 1508 he was back in Milan, living in his own house in Porta Orientale in the parish of Santa Babila.[34]

Old age, 1513-1519

Photo of a large medieval house, built of brick with many windows and gables and a circular tower with a conical roof.
Clos Lucé in France, where Leonardo died in 1519
.From September 1513 to 1516, Leonardo spent much of his time living in the Belvedere in the Vatican in Rome, where Raphael and Michelangelo were both active at the time.^ The poster "a devout Catholic" clearly hasn't spent much time considering the message of the New Testament, you know, the whole tolerance and forgiveness thingies.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[34] In October 1515, Francis I of France recaptured Milan.[22] On December 19, Leonardo was present at the meeting of Francis I and Pope Leo X, which took place in Bologna.[10][35][36] .It was for Francis that Leonardo was commissioned to make a mechanical lion which could walk forward, then open its chest to reveal a cluster of lilies.^ Leonardo asked as he tried to make the boy as comfortable as he could.
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

[37][nb .15] In 1516, he entered François' service, being given the use of the manor house Clos Lucé[nb 16] near the king's residence at the royal Chateau Amboise.^ As may be seen from the last sentence, the observation was made after long study of the river's course, when Leonardo had resided for some time at, or near, Amboise.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

It was here that he spent the last three years of his life, accompanied by his friend and apprentice, Count Francesco Melzi, supported by a pension totalling 10,000 scudi.[34]
Leonardo died at Clos Lucé, on May 2, 1519. Francis I had become a close friend. .Vasari records that the King held Leonardo's head in his arms as he died, although this story, beloved by the French and portrayed in romantic paintings by Ingres, Ménageot and other French artists, as well as by Angelica Kauffmann, may be legend rather than fact.^ While it is true that John looks effeminate in The Last Supper, this is quite in keeping with other paintings by this homosexual artist.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ What may be more interesting — and troubling — than the changes to the story’s religious aspects is what Goldsman and Howard do with Tautou’s character.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The facts are that Christians adopt special needs and older children far more than any other group.
  • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

[nb .17][39] Vasari also tells us that in his last days, Leonardo sent for a priest to make his confession and to receive the Holy Sacrament.^ Francesco Vinci, Leonardo's uncle, died--as Amoretti tells us--in the winter of l5l0-11 (or according to Uzielli in 1506?
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[40] In accordance to his will, sixty beggars followed his casket. He was buried in the Chapel of Saint-Hubert in the castle of Amboise. .Melzi was the principal heir and executor, receiving as well as money, Leonardo's paintings, tools, library and personal effects.^ At the end of all I have given Leonardo's will from the copy of it preserved in the Melzi Library.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

.Leonardo also remembered his other long-time pupil and companion, Salai and his servant Battista di Vilussis, who each received half of Leonardo's vineyards, his brothers who received land, and his serving woman who received a black cloak "of good stuff" with a fur edge.^ As Buddha taught, we should "Serve those who are worthy of serving, and be kind to all others".
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ As may be seen from the last sentence, the observation was made after long study of the river's course, when Leonardo had resided for some time at, or near, Amboise.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (Cicero) You must become an old man in good time if you wish to be an old man long.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

[41]
Some twenty years after Leonardo's death, Francis was reported by the goldsmith and sculptor Benevenuto Cellini as saying: "There had never been another man born in the world who knew as much as Leonardo, not so much about painting, sculpture and architecture, as that he was a very great philosopher."[42]

Relationships and influences

Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise, (1425-1452) were a source of communal pride. Many artists assisted in their creation.

Florence — Leonardo's artistic and social background

Florence, at the time of Leonardo's youth was the centre of Humanist thought and culture.[43] Leonardo commenced his apprenticeship with Verrocchio in 1466, the year that Verrocchio's master, the great sculptor Donatello, died. .The painter Uccello whose early experiments with perspective were to influence the development of landscape painting, was a very old man.^ Nash writes: "Almost all of our sources of information about the pagan religions alleged to have influenced early Christianity are dated very late.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

.The painters Piero della Francesca and Fra Filippo Lippi, sculptor Luca della Robbia, and architect and writer Leon Battista Alberti were in their sixties.^ This is in Battista Alberti [Footnote 25: LEON BATTISTA ALBERTI, _De Architectura lib.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

The successful artists of the next generation were Leonardo's teacher Verrocchio, Antonio Pollaiuolo and the portrait sculptor, Mino da Fiesole whose lifelike busts give the most reliable likenesses of Lorenzo Medici's father Piero and uncle Giovanni.[44][45][46][47]
Leonardo's youth was spent in a Florence that was ornamented by the works of these artists and by Donatello's contemporaries, Masaccio whose figurative frescoes were imbued with realism and emotion and Ghiberti whose Gates of Paradise, gleaming with gold leaf, displayed the art of combining complex figure compositions with detailed architectural backgrounds. Piero della Francesca had made a detailed study of perspective,[48] and was the first painter to make a scientific study of light. These studies and Alberti's Treatise[49] were to have a profound effect on younger artists and in particular on Leonardo's own observations and artworks.[44][46][47]
.Massaccio's depiction of the naked and distraught Adam and Eve leaving the Garden of Eden created a powerfully expressive image of the human form, cast into three dimensions by the use of light and shade which was to be developed in the works of Leonardo in a way that was to be influential in the course of painting.^ But I don’t have a way to post an image I create.
  • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

^ Why this comet appears of variable forms, so that it is now round and now long, and now again divided into two or three parts, and now in one piece, and when it is to be seen again.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ SMALL BOATS. The small boats used by the Assyrians were made of thin laths of willow plaited over rods also of willow, and bent into the form of a boat.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

The Humanist influence of Donatello's David can be seen in Leonardo's late paintings, particularly John the Baptist.[44],[45]
Small devotional picture by Verrocchio, c. 1470
A prevalent tradition in Florence was the small altarpiece of the Virgin and Child. Many of these were created in tempera or glazed terracotta by the workshops of Filippo Lippi, Verrocchio and the prolific della Robbia family.[44] .Leonardo's early Madonnas such as the The Madonna with a carnation and The Benois Madonna followed this tradition while showing idiosyncratic departures, particularly in the case of the Benois Madonna in which the Virgin is set at an oblique angle to the picture space with the Christ Child at the opposite angle.^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But we should then be equally justified in supposing some more of Leonardo's letters to be fragments of such romances; particularly those of which the addresses can no longer be named.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

This compositional theme was to emerge in Leonardo's later paintings such as The Virgin and Child with St. Anne.[10]
Leonardo was a contemporary of Botticelli, Domenico Ghirlandaio and Perugino, who were all slightly older than he was.[45] He would have met them at the workshop of Verrocchio, with whom they had associations, and at the Academy of the Medici.[10] Botticelli was a particular favourite of the Medici family and thus his success as a painter was assured. Ghirlandaio and Perugino were both prolific and ran large workshops. They competently delivered commissions to well-satisfied patrons who appreciated Ghirlandaio's ability to portray the wealthy citizens of Florence within large religious frescoes, and Perugino's ability to deliver a multitude of saints and angels of unfailing sweetness and innocence.[44]
The Portinari Altarpiece, by Hugo van der Goes for a Florentine family
These three were among those commissioned to paint the walls of the Sistine Chapel, the work commencing with Perugino's employment in 1479. Leonardo was not part of this prestigious commission. His first significant commission, The Adoration of the Magi for the Monks of Scopeto, was never completed.[10]
In 1476, during the time of Leonardo's association with Verrocchio's workshop, the Portinari Altarpiece by Hugo van der Goes arrived in Florence, bringing new painterly techniques from Northern Europe which were to profoundly effect Leonardo, Ghirlandaio, Perugino and others.[45] In 1479, the Sicilian painter Antonello da Messina, who worked exclusively in oils, traveled north on his way to Venice, where the leading painter, Giovanni Bellini adopted the technique of oil painting, quickly making it the preferred method in Venice. Leonardo was also later to visit Venice.[45][47]
.Like the two contemporary architects, Bramante and Antonio da Sangallo the Elder, Leonardo experimented with designs for centrally planned churches, a number of which appear in his journals, as both plans and views, although none was ever realised.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[45][50]
Lorenzo de' Medici between Antonio Pucci and Francesco Sassetti, with Giulio de' Medici, fresco by Ghirlandaio
Leonardo's political contemporaries were Lorenzo Medici (il Magnifico), who was three years older, and his popular younger brother Giuliano who was slain in the Pazzi Conspiracy in 1478. Ludovico il Moro who ruled Milan between 1479–1499 and to whom Leonardo was sent as ambassador from the Medici court, was also of Leonardo's age.[45]
.With Alberti, Leonardo visited the home of the Medici and through them came to know the older Humanist philosophers of whom Marsiglio Ficino, proponent of Neo Platonism, Cristoforo Landino, writer of commentaries on Classical writings, and John Argyropoulos, teacher of Greek and translator of Aristotle were foremost.^ Also, one of the main ways modern scholars know what "heretics" said in the first few centuries after the death of Jesus, is through the writings of the early "church fathers."
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Also associated with the Academy of the Medici was Leonardo's contemporary, the brilliant young poet and philosopher Pico della Mirandola.[45][47][51] Leonardo later wrote in the margin of a journal "The Medici made me and the Medici destroyed me." While it was through the action of Lorenzo that Leonardo was to receive his important Milanese commissions, it is not known exactly what Leonardo meant by this cryptic comment.[10]
.Although usually named together as the three giants of the High Renaissance, Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael were not of the same generation.^ Italian Renaissance drawings at the British Museum: from Leonardo to Lorenzo di Credi 15 Jul 2009: Preview a new exhibition of Italian Renaissance drawings at the British Museum, where drawings by Michelangelo and Leonardo, so delicate that they are only shown once in a generation, will be on display .
  • Jonathan Jones: Tourist snappers are killing the Mona Lisa | Art and design | guardian.co.uk 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

Leonardo was twenty-three when Michelangelo was born and thirty-one when Raphael was born.[45] .Raphael only lived until the age of 37 and died in 1520, the year after Leonardo, but Michelangelo went on creating for another 45 years.^ In the year of Leonardo's birth Ser Piero married Albiera di Giovanni Amadoci, and after her death at the age of thirty eight he again married, Francesca, daughter of Ser Giovanni Lanfredi, then only fifteen.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At that time Melzi was only six years of age.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[46][47]
Study for a portrait of Isabella d'Este (1500) Louvre.

Personal life

.Within Leonardo's lifetime, his extraordinary powers of invention, his "outstanding physical beauty", "infinite grace", "great strength and generosity", "regal spirit and tremendous breadth of mind" as described by Vasari,[52] as well as all other aspects of his life, attracted the curiosity of others.^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nothing of the kind happened in Italy during Leonardo's lifetime, and it is therefore extremely probable that this refers to the natural phenomena which are so fully described in the foregoing passage.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

One such aspect is his respect for life evidenced by his vegetarianism and his habit, described by Vasari, of purchasing caged birds and releasing them.[53][54]
Leonardo had many friends who are now renowned either in their fields or for their historical significance. They included the mathematician Luca Pacioli,[55] with whom he collaborated on a book in the 1490s, as well as Franchinus Gaffurius and Isabella d'Este..October 2009" style="white-space:nowrap;">[citation needed] Leonardo appears to have had no close relationships with women except for his friendship with Isabella d'Este.^ But on close examination no one can doubt that these documents, with the accompanying sketches, are the work of Leonardo's own hand.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

He drew a portrait of her while on a journey which took him through Mantua, and which appears to have been used to create a painted portrait now lost.[10]
.Beyond friendship, Leonardo kept his private life secret.^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

His sexuality has been the subject of satire, analysis, and speculation. This trend began in the mid-16th century and was revived in the 19th and 20th centuries, most notably by Sigmund Freud.[56]
.Leonardo's most intimate relationships were perhaps with his pupils Salai and Melzi, Melzi describing Leonardo's feelings for him as both loving and intensely passionate.^ Melzi practised art under Leonardo as a dilettante and not as a pupil, like Cesare da Sesto and others (See LERMOLIEFF, _Die Galerien_ &c., p.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Magnificent President, I am sending thither Salai, my pupil, who is the bearer of this, and from him you will hear by word of mouth the cause of my...
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

.It has been claimed since the 16th century that these relationships were of a sexual or erotic nature.^ The contents of these confessions, which have largely to do with the nature of God and Jesus, have been affirmed by Christians for sixteen centuries.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

.Court records of 1476, when he was aged twenty-four, show that Leonardo and three other young men were charged with sodomy, and acquitted.^ Even if we add in other documents that record esoteric teachings of the Savior, the total number of "gospels" might be as high as twenty five, if we count generously.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

[9] .Since that date much has been written about his presumed homosexuality and its role in his art, particularly in the androgyny and eroticism manifested in John the Baptist and Bacchus and more explicitly in a number of erotic drawings.^ So, for example, Irenaeus of Lyons, writing in about 180 A.D., mentions Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John by name, so we can be sure they were written before this time.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ The reverse of this leaf is coloured red for drawing in silver point, but has not been used for that purpose but for writing on, and at about the same date.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Since we have very little knowledge of actual Gnostic communities, it's hard to say much about how Gnostic people actually lived.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

[57]
Salai as John the Baptist (c. 1514)—Louvre

Assistants and pupils

.Gian Giacomo Caprotti da Oreno, nicknamed Salai or Il Salaino ("The Little Unclean One" i.e., the devil), entered Leonardo's household in 1490. After only a year, Leonardo made a list of his misdemeanours, calling him "a thief, a liar, stubborn, and a glutton", after he had made off with money and valuables on at least five occasions, and spent a fortune on clothes.^ But that lasted only one year as well.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Perhaps unfortunately, I only spent one year there, though it was the best educational institution I ever attended.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A considerable proportion of these notes belong to the period between 1490 and 1500, when Leonardo was living at Milan under the patronage of Lodovico il Moro, a time concerning which we have otherwise only very scanty information.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[58] Nevertheless, Leonardo treated him with great indulgence and he remained in Leonardo's household for the next thirty years.[59] .Salai executed a number of paintings under the name of Andrea Salai, but although Vasari claims that Leonardo "taught him a great deal about painting",[37] his work is generally considered to be of less artistic merit than others among Leonardo's pupils, such as Marco d'Oggione and Boltraffio.^ Leonardo and this prince were certainly far less closely connected, than has hitherto been supposed.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles d'Amboise, Marechal de Chaumont, was Governor of Milan under Louis XII. Leonardo was in personal communication with him so early as in 1503.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

In 1515, he painted a nude version of the Mona Lisa, known as Monna Vanna.[60] .Salai owned the Mona Lisa at the time of his death in 1525, and in his will it was assessed at 505 lire, an exceptionally high valuation for a small panel portrait.^ This was our second time dining at Mona Lisa Fondue Restaurant.
  • Mona Lisa Fondue Restaurant Reviews - Rated by OpenTable Diners 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC reviews.opentable.com [Source type: General]

[61]
.In 1506, Leonardo took on another pupil, Count Francesco Melzi, the son of a Lombard aristocrat, who is considered to have been his favourite student.^ Francesco Vinci, Leonardo's uncle, died--as Amoretti tells us--in the winter of l5l0-11 (or according to Uzielli in 1506?
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Melzi practised art under Leonardo as a dilettante and not as a pupil, like Cesare da Sesto and others (See LERMOLIEFF, _Die Galerien_ &c., p.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

He travelled to France with Leonardo, and remained with him until the latter's death.[10] Upon Leonardo's death, Melzi inherited the artistic and scientific works, manuscripts, and collections of Leonardo, and faithfully administered the estate.

Painting

Annunciation (1475–1480)—Uffizi, is thought to be Leonardo's earliest complete work
.Despite the recent awareness and admiration of Leonardo as a scientist and inventor, for the better part of four hundred years his enormous fame rested on his achievements as a painter and on a handful of works, either authenticated or attributed to him that have been regarded as among the supreme masterpieces ever created.^ But on close examination no one can doubt that these documents, with the accompanying sketches, are the work of Leonardo's own hand.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[62]
These paintings are famous for a variety of qualities which have been much imitated by students and discussed at great length by connoisseurs and critics. Among the qualities that make Leonardo's work unique are the innovative techniques that he used in laying on the paint, his detailed knowledge of anatomy, light, botany and geology, his interest in physiognomy and the way in which humans register emotion in expression and gesture, his innovative use of the human form in figurative composition and his use of the subtle gradation of tone. .All these qualities come together in his most famous painted works, the Mona Lisa, the Last Supper and the Virgin of the Rocks.^ When it comes to the most important points, these books offer basically the same insights and come to basically the same conclusions.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ For the most part, the manuscripts we have of these documents are at least a century later than the actual writing, so they provide little help when it comes to dating.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

[63]
Unfinished painting of St. Jerome in the Wilderness, (c. 1480), Vatican

Early works

Leonardo's early works begin with the Baptism of Christ painted in conjunction with Verrocchio. Two other paintings appear to date from his time at the workshop, both of which are Annunciations. One is small, 59 centimetres (23 in) long and 14 centimetres (5.5 in) high. It is a "predella" to go at the base of a larger composition, in this case a painting by Lorenzo di Credi from which it has become separated. The other is a much larger work, 217 centimetres (85 in) long.[64] .In both these Annunciations, Leonardo has used a formal arrangement, such as in Fra Angelico's two well known pictures of the same subject, of the Virgin Mary sitting or kneeling to the right of the picture, approached from the left by an angel in profile, with rich flowing garment, raised wings and bearing a lily.^ Leonardo was, as is well known, a natural son.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The medal struck in honour of the event bears the words MAG. IVLIAN. MEDICES. Leonardo too uses the style "Magnifico", in his letter.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ All these verses contain the word proskuneo, the same word used of worshipping the Father in the New Testament.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

Although previously attributed to Ghirlandaio, the larger work is now almost universally attributed to Leonardo.[65]
In the smaller picture Mary averts her eyes and folds her hands in a gesture that symbolised submission to God's will. In the larger picture, however, Mary is not in the least submissive. The beautiful girl, interrupted in her reading by this unexpected messenger, puts a finger in her bible to mark the place and raises her hand in a formal gesture of greeting or surprise.[44] This calm young woman appears to accept her role as the Mother of God not with resignation but with confidence. In this painting the young Leonardo presents the Humanist face of the Virgin Mary, recognising humanity's role in God's incarnation.[nb 18]

Paintings of the 1480s

Virgin of the Rocks, Louvre, possibly 1505–1508, demonstrates Leonardo's interest in nature.
In the 1480s Leonardo received two very important commissions, and commenced another work which was also of ground-breaking importance in terms of composition. .Unfortunately two of the three were never finished and the third took so long that it was subject to lengthy negotiations over completion and payment.^ Why this comet appears of variable forms, so that it is now round and now long, and now again divided into two or three parts, and now in one piece, and when it is to be seen again.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

One of these paintings is that of St. Jerome in the Wilderness. .Bortolon associates this picture with a difficult period of Leonardo's life, and the signs of melancholy in his diary: "I thought I was learning to live; I was only learning to die."^ A considerable proportion of these notes belong to the period between 1490 and 1500, when Leonardo was living at Milan under the patronage of Lodovico il Moro, a time concerning which we have otherwise only very scanty information.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Vasari and other early biographers give us a very superficial and far from accurate picture of Leonardo's private life.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Albert Einstein There are only two ways to live your life.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

[10]
Although the painting is barely begun the composition can be seen and it is very unusual.[nb 19] Jerome, as a penitent, occupies the middle of the picture, set on a slight diagonal and viewed somewhat from above. His kneeling form takes on a trapezoid shape, with one arm stretched to the outer edge of the painting and his gaze looking in the opposite direction. J. Wasserman points out the link between this painting and Leonardo's anatomical studies.[67] .Across the foreground sprawls his symbol, a great lion whose body and tail make a double spiral across the base of the picture space.^ I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable which, entering among the enemy with their artillery, there is no body of men so great but they would break them.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

The other remarkable feature is the sketchy landscape of craggy rocks against which the figure is silhouetted.
The daring display of figure composition, the landscape elements and personal drama also appear in the great unfinished masterpiece, the Adoration of the Magi, a commission from the Monks of San Donato a Scopeto. It is a very complex composition about 250 square centimetres. Leonardo did numerous drawings and preparatory studies, including a detailed one in linear perspective of the ruined classical architecture which makes part of the backdrop to the scene. But in 1482 Leonardo went off to Milan at the behest of Lorenzo de’ Medici in order to win favour with Ludovico il Moro and the painting was abandoned.[9][65]
The third important work of this period is the Virgin of the Rocks which was commissioned in Milan for the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception. The painting, to be done with the assistance of the de Predis brothers, was to fill a large complex altarpiece, already constructed.[68] .Leonardo chose to paint an apocryphal moment of the infancy of Christ when the Infant John the Baptist, in protection of an angel, met the Holy Family on the road to Egypt.^ Note that neither John nor John the Baptist have womanly bodies in these paintings.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

.In this scene, as painted by Leonardo, John recognizes and worships Jesus as the Christ.^ Yet another evidence Dan Brown sets forth for Jesus' alleged marriage is Leonardo Da Vinci's painting of The Last Supper.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The same is true of the apostle John, who wrote: "Through him [Jesus Christ] all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made" (John 1:3).
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

The painting demonstrates an eerie beauty as the graceful figures kneel in adoration around the infant Christ in a wild landscape of tumbling rock and whirling water.[69] .While the painting is quite large, about 200 × 120 centimetres, it is not nearly as complex as the painting ordered by the monks of St Donato, having only four figures rather than about fifty and a rocky landscape rather than architectural details.^ They reduce Sophie to nothing more than the audience’s proxy — not only ignorant of the details of the Grail legend but essentially a spectator through much of the film.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The painting was eventually finished; in fact, two versions of the painting were finished, one which remained at the chapel of the Confraternity and the other which Leonardo carried away to France.^ Item: I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze or clay, and also in painting whatever may be done, and as well as any other, be he whom he may.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Afterwards he wanted to have the models finished in wood, just as they were to be in iron, and wished to carry them away to his own country.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

But the Brothers did not get their painting, or the de Predis their payment, until the next century.[16][28]

Paintings of the 1490s

.Leonardo's most famous painting of the 1490s is The Last Supper, also painted in Milan.^ While it is true that John looks effeminate in The Last Supper, this is quite in keeping with other paintings by this homosexual artist.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet another evidence Dan Brown sets forth for Jesus' alleged marriage is Leonardo Da Vinci's painting of The Last Supper.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ [Footnote 19: In April, 1498, Leonardo was engaged in painting the Saletta Nigra of the Castello at Milan.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

.The painting represents the last meal shared by Jesus with his disciples before his capture and death.^ Yet another evidence Dan Brown sets forth for Jesus' alleged marriage is Leonardo Da Vinci's painting of The Last Supper.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Gnostic Gospels portray Jesus as commanding the disciples to keep his teaching secret, but the New Testament Jesus commissioned the disciples to share the good news with the whole world.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

.It shows specifically the moment when Jesus has said "one of you will betray me". Leonardo tells the story of the consternation that this statement caused to the twelve followers of Jesus.^ In The Gospel of Thomas, however, Jesus and the disciples are portrayed in a much different light: Jesus said to his disciples, "Compare me to someone and tell Me whom I am like."
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Plus, given that the culture in which Jesus ministered was predominantly oral, not written, it's highly unlikely that many of his followers wrote down what he said and did.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ In 2 Peter 1:16 we read, "We did not follow cleverly invented stories when we told you about the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty."
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

[16]
.The novelist Matteo Bandello observed Leonardo at work and wrote that some days he would paint from dawn till dusk without stopping to eat, and then not paint for three or four days at a time.^ It is now some time since I heard that the canal was in order, as also its outlets, and I immediately wrote to the President and to you, and then I repeated it, and never had an answer.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Only suggestions would be watch the hardwood floor where there is some uneveness and it was a bit chilly at times.
  • Mona Lisa Fondue Restaurant Reviews - Rated by OpenTable Diners 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC reviews.opentable.com [Source type: General]

^ It would seem from the text that Leonardo intended to have instructions in painting on paper.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[70] This, according to Vasari, was beyond the comprehension of the prior, who hounded him until Leonardo asked Ludovico to intervene. Vasari describes how Leonardo, troubled over his ability to adequately depict the faces of Christ and the traitor Judas, told the Duke that he might be obliged to use the prior as his model.[71]
.When finished, the painting was acclaimed as a masterpiece of design and characterisation,[72] but it deteriorated rapidly, so that within a hundred years it was described by one viewer as "completely ruined".[73] Leonardo, instead of using the reliable technique of fresco, had used tempera over a ground that was mainly gesso, resulting in a surface which was subject to mold and to flaking.^ Hence, Luke's gospel was recognized as Scripture within three years of its writing—hundreds of years before most of the Gnostic gospels.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ One should also note that the virgin birth of Jesus was prophesied (e.g., Isaiah 7:14) hundreds of years before these pagan religions were setting forth their versions of a virgin birth.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

[74] .Despite this, the painting has remained one of the most reproduced works of art, countless copies being made in every medium from carpets to cameos.^ Disputed Handwriting An exhaustive, valuable, and comprehensive work upon one of the most important subjects of to-day.
  • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

Paintings of the 1500s

Mona Lisa or La Gioconda (1503–1505/1507)—Louvre, Paris, France
.Among the works created by Leonardo in the 1500s is the small portrait known as the Mona Lisa or "la Gioconda", the laughing one.^ But on close examination no one can doubt that these documents, with the accompanying sketches, are the work of Leonardo's own hand.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Actually I was born the year the song "Mona Lisa" by Nat King Cole was popular in the small town where I was born ...
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

In the present era it is arguably the most famous painting in the world. Its fame rests, in particular, on the elusive smile on the woman's face, its mysterious quality brought about perhaps by the fact that the artist has subtly shadowed the corners of the mouth and eyes so that the exact nature of the smile cannot be determined. The shadowy quality for which the work is renowned came to be called "sfumato" or Leonardo's smoke. Vasari, who is generally thought to have known the painting only by repute, said that "the smile was so pleasing that it seemed divine rather than human; and those who saw it were amazed to find that it was as alive as the original".[75][nb 20]
.Other characteristics found in this work are the unadorned dress, in which the eyes and hands have no competition from other details, the dramatic landscape background in which the world seems to be in a state of flux, the subdued colouring and the extremely smooth nature of the painterly technique, employing oils, but laid on much like tempera and blended on the surface so that the brushstrokes are indistinguishable.^ I think the majority of readers like a literary work as much as a beach read.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But on close examination no one can doubt that these documents, with the accompanying sketches, are the work of Leonardo's own hand.
  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[nb 21] Vasari expressed the opinion that the manner of painting would make even "the most confident master ... despair and lose heart."[78] .The perfect state of preservation and the fact that there is no sign of repair or overpainting is extremely rare in a panel painting of this date.^ The other, as I have already said, consists in the fact that no one is concealing anything; there is no mystery whatever.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

[79]
In the Virgin and Child with St. Anne (see below [StAnne]) the composition again picks up the theme of figures in a landscape which Wasserman describes as "breathtakingly beautiful"[80] and harks back to the St Jerome picture with the figure set at an oblique angle. What makes this painting unusual is that there are two obliquely set figures superimposed. Mary is seated on the knee of her mother, St Anne. She leans forward to restrain the Christ Child as he plays roughly with a lamb, the sign of his own impending sacrifice.[16] This painting, which was copied many times, was to influence Michelangelo, Raphael, and Andrea del Sarto,[81] and through them Pontormo and Correggio. The trends in composition were adopted in particular by the Venetian painters Tintoretto and Veronese.

Drawings

Leonardo was not a prolific painter, but he was a most prolific draftsman, keeping journals full of small sketches and detailed drawings recording all manner of things that took his attention. .As well as the journals there exist many studies for paintings, some of which can be identified as preparatory to particular works such as The Adoration of the Magi, The Virgin of the Rocks and The Last Supper.^ Everyone knows very well that if, for instance, a man wants to learn Chinese, it will take several years of intense work; every- one knows that five years are needed to grasp the principles of medicine, and perhaps twice as many years for the study of painting or music.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ While it is true that John looks effeminate in The Last Supper, this is quite in keeping with other paintings by this homosexual artist.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet another evidence Dan Brown sets forth for Jesus' alleged marriage is Leonardo Da Vinci's painting of The Last Supper.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

[82] His earliest dated drawing is a Landscape of the Arno Valley, 1473, which shows the river, the mountains, Montelupo Castle and the farmlands beyond it in great detail.[10][82]
Among his famous drawings are the Vitruvian Man, a study of the proportions of the human body, the Head of an Angel, for The Virgin of the Rocks in the Louvre, a botanical study of Star of Bethlehem and a large drawing (160×100 cm) in black chalk on coloured paper of the The Virgin and Child with St. Anne and St. John the Baptist in the National Gallery, London.[82] This drawing employs the subtle sfumato technique of shading, in the manner of the Mona Lisa. It is thought that Leonardo never made a painting from it, the closest similarity being to The Virgin and Child with St. Anne in the Louvre.[83]
.Other drawings of interest include numerous studies generally referred to as "caricatures" because, although exaggerated, they appear to be based upon observation of live models.^ Because many of the extra-biblical gospels depend upon the text of the biblical gospels and other writings, and because they reflect the issues and theological tendencies of the second-century or later, the non-canonical gospels were written, for the most part, at least two generations after the biblical books, and often much more.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ This is necessary because, though The Da Vinci Code doesn't discuss Gnosticism directly, it does draw from Gnostic writings, and it does speak favorably of the gospels generally known as Gnostic.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ The slavery in which mankind lives is based upon this fear.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

.Vasari relates that if Leonardo saw a person with an interesting face he would follow them around all day observing them.^ Not me, I happen to think it makes for some interesting conversation, but you know - some people would rather sit around and bitch, so more power to you I guess.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[84] There are numerous studies of beautiful young men, often associated with Salai, with the rare and much admired facial feature, the so-called "Grecian profile".[nb 22] These faces are often contrasted with that of a warrior.[82] Salai is often depicted in fancy-dress costume. Leonardo is known to have designed sets for pageants with which these may be associated. Other, often meticulous, drawings show studies of drapery. A marked development in Leonardo's ability to draw drapery occurred in his early works. .Another often-reproduced drawing is a macabre sketch that was done by Leonardo in Florence in 1479 showing the body of Bernardo Baroncelli, hanged in connection with the murder of Giuliano, brother of Lorenzo de'Medici, in the Pazzi Conspiracy.^ The film exonerates the Vatican of any part in the conspiracy plot, showing the conspirators’ fears that they’d be excommunicated if their dirty deeds were ever found out.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[82] With dispassionate integrity Leonardo has registered in neat mirror writing the colours of the robes that Baroncelli was wearing when he died.

Leonardo as observer, scientist and inventor

Journals

.Renaissance humanism saw no mutually exclusive polarities between the sciences and the arts, and Leonardo's studies in science and engineering are as impressive and innovative as his artistic work, recorded in notebooks comprising some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, which fuse art and natural philosophy (the forerunner of modern science).^ Diaries of Sir Moses and Lady Montefiore, Volume I Comprising Their Life and Work as Recorded in Their Diaries From 1812 to 1883 (English) (as Editor) Loewenfeld, Leopold, 1847-1924 .
  • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
  • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.These notes were made and maintained daily throughout Leonardo's life and travels, as he made continual observations of the world around him.^ To successfully revise or make a change in the Bible, all these copies would have to be meticulously gathered (assuming people around the world would be willing to surrender them, an impossible–to–believe scenario), and then the changes made.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ While under oath, the judge asked him about these documents about Jesus and Mary Magdalene, and he admitted he made the whole thing up.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Norman Vincent Peale The person who sends out positive thoughts activates the world around him positively and draws back to himslef positive results.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

[16]
The journals are mostly written in mirror-image cursive. .The reason may have been more a practical expediency than for reasons of secrecy as is often suggested.^ Sociological analysis of Gnostic documents can offer some suggestions, but these are more speculative than solid.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ What may be more interesting — and troubling — than the changes to the story’s religious aspects is what Goldsman and Howard do with Tautou’s character.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Objectively, one seems alot more reasonable than the other, that's all I'm saying...
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Since Leonardo wrote with his left hand, it is probable that it was easier for him to write from right to left.[nb 23]
A page from Leonardo's journal showing his study of a foetus in the womb (c. 1510) Royal Library, Windsor Castle
.His notes and drawings display an enormous range of interests and preoccupations, some as mundane as lists of groceries and people who owed him money and some as intriguing as designs for wings and shoes for walking on water.^ In the interest of accuracy, I will note that there were some books that were doubted for a time, but not for long.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Not me, I happen to think it makes for some interesting conversation, but you know - some people would rather sit around and bitch, so more power to you I guess.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To be sure, there are some Christians, or people who claim to be Christian, at any rate, who do not affirm these core beliefs.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

There are compositions for paintings, studies of details and drapery, studies of faces and emotions, of animals, babies, dissections, plant studies, rock formations, whirl pools, war machines, helicopters and architecture.[16]
.These notebooks—originally loose papers of different types and sizes, distributed by friends after his death—have found their way into major collections such as the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, the Louvre, the Biblioteca Nacional de España, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan which holds the twelve-volume Codex Atlanticus, and British Library in London which has put a selection from its notebook BL Arundel MS 263 online.^ Shoot in some fantastic locations, including the Musée de Louvre in Paris and The Temple Church in London; .
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ A second theory is that the library was collected by Christian Gnostic monks before the time when such monks were considered heretics and consequently expelled.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

[85] The Codex Leicester is the only major scientific work of Leonardo's in private hands. .It is owned by Bill Gates, and is displayed once a year in different cities around the world.^ Another scenario is that thousands of Bible–owning people from around the world met together and colluded to make the changes.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

Leonardo's journals appear to have been intended for publication because many of the sheets have a form and order that would facilitate this. .In many cases a single topic, for example, the heart or the human foetus, is covered in detail in both words and pictures, on a single sheet.^ Categories: Audio Book, computer-generated Audio Book, human-read Compilations Data Music, recorded Music, Sheet Other recordings Pictures, moving Pictures, still .
  • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

[86][nb .24] Why they were not published within Leonardo's lifetime is unknown.^ Julia, you have a point, which is why Mr. Fox suggested that they cast an unknown in the role instead.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[16]

Scientific studies

Rhombicuboctahedron as published in Pacioli's De Divina Proportione
Leonardo's approach to science was an observational one: he tried to understand a phenomenon by describing and depicting it in utmost detail, and did not emphasize experiments or theoretical explanation. Since he lacked formal education in Latin and mathematics, contemporary scholars mostly ignored Leonardo the scientist, although he did teach himself Latin. In the 1490s he studied mathematics under Luca Pacioli and prepared a series of drawings of regular solids in a skeletal form to be engraved as plates for Pacioli's book De Divina Proportione, published in 1509.[16]
It appears that from the content of his journals he was planning a series of treatises to be published on a variety of subjects. .A coherent treatise on anatomy was said to have been observed during a visit by Cardinal Louis D'Aragon's secretary in 1517.[87] Aspects of his work on the studies of anatomy, light and the landscape were assembled for publication by his pupil Francesco Melzi and eventually published as Treatise on Painting by Leonardo da Vinci in France and Italy in 1651, and Germany in 1724,[88] with engravings based upon drawings by the Classical painter Nicholas Poussin.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
  • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[citation needed] According to Arasse, the treatise, which in France went into sixty two editions in fifty years, caused Leonardo to be seen as "the precursor of French academic thought on art".[16]
.A recent and exhaustive analysis of Leonardo as Scientist by Frtijof Capra [89] argues that Leonardo was a fundamentally different kind of scientist from Galileo, Newton and other scientists who followed him.^ As Buddha taught, we should "Serve those who are worthy of serving, and be kind to all others".
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Arius, a presbyter of Alexandria who was the founder of Arianism, argued that the Son was created from the non–existent, and was of a different substance than the Father.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

Leonardo's experimentation followed clear scientific method approaches, and his theorising and hypothesising integrated the arts and particularly painting; these, and Leonardo's unique integrated, holistic views of science make him a forerunner of modern systems theory and complexity schools of thought.
Anatomical study of the arm, (c. 1510)

Anatomy

.Leonardo's formal training in the anatomy of the human body began with his apprenticeship to Andrea del Verrocchio, his teacher insisting that all his pupils learn anatomy.^ Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Arthur Koestler : Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

As an artist, he quickly became master of topographic anatomy, drawing many studies of muscles, tendons and other visible anatomical features.
As a successful artist, he was given permission to dissect human corpses at the Hospital of Santa Maria Nuova in Florence and later at hospitals in Milan and Rome. .From 1510 to 1511 he collaborated in his studies with the doctor Marcantonio della Torre and together they prepared a theoretical work on anatomy for which Leonardo made more than 200 drawings.^ They said to him, 'Why do you love her more than all of us?'"
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They reduce Sophie to nothing more than the audience’s proxy — not only ignorant of the details of the Grail legend but essentially a spectator through much of the film.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Although a popular more than a scholarly book, my research for this book caught me up on the academic study of Jesus and the gospels, including the Gnostic gospels.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

It was published only in 1680 (161 years after his death) under the heading Treatise on painting.[16][82]
Leonardo drew many studies of the human skeleton and its parts, as well as muscles and sinews, the heart and vascular system, the sex organs, and other internal organs. He made one of the first scientific drawings of a fetus in utero.[82] As an artist, Leonardo closely observed and recorded the effects of age and of human emotion on the physiology, studying in particular the effects of rage. He also drew many figures who had significant facial deformities or signs of illness.[16][82]
He also studied and drew the anatomy of many other animals as well, dissecting cows, birds, monkeys, bears, and frogs, and comparing in his drawings their anatomical structure with that of humans. He also made a number of studies of horses.

Engineering and inventions

A design for a flying machine, (c. 1488) Institut de France, Paris
During his lifetime Leonardo was valued as an engineer. In a letter to Ludovico il Moro he claimed to be able to create all sorts of machines both for the protection of a city and for siege. When he fled to Venice in 1499 he found employment as an engineer and devised a system of moveable barricades to protect the city from attack. He also had a scheme for diverting the flow of the Arno River, a project on which Niccolò Machiavelli also worked.[90][91] Leonardo's journals include a vast number of inventions, both practical and impractical. They include musical instruments, hydraulic pumps, reversible crank mechanisms, finned mortar shells, and a steam cannon.[10][16]
In 1502, Leonardo produced a drawing of a single span 720-foot (240 m) bridge as part of a civil engineering project for Ottoman Sultan Beyazid II of Istanbul. The bridge was intended to span an inlet at the mouth of the Bosporus known as the Golden Horn. Beyazid did not pursue the project, because he believed that such a construction was impossible. Leonardo's vision was resurrected in 2001 when a smaller bridge based on his design was constructed in Norway.[92] .On May 17, 2006, the Turkish government decided to construct Leonardo's bridge to span the Golden Horn.^ Posted by: altan at May 23, 2006 2:17 PM .
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Posted by: Brian at May 22, 2006 1:17 PM .
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Posted by: Rob at May 25, 2006 9:17 PM .
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[93]
For much of his life, Leonardo was fascinated by the phenomenon of flight, producing many studies of the flight of birds, including his c. 1505 Codex on the Flight of Birds, as well as plans for several flying machines, including a helicopter and a light hang glider.[16] Most were impractical, like his aerial screw helicopter design that could not provide lift. However, the hang glider has been successfully constructed and demonstrated.[94]

Leonardo the legend

Francis I of France receiving the last breath of Leonardo da Vinci, by Ingres, 1818.
Within Leonardo's own lifetime his fame was such that the King of France carried him away like a trophy, and was claimed to have supported him in his old age and held him in his arms as he died.[95] The interest in Leonardo has never slackened. .The crowds still queue to see his most famous artworks, T-shirts bear his most famous drawing and writers, like Vasari, continue to marvel at his genius and speculate about his private life and, particularly, about what one so intelligent actually believed in.^ In particular, one of his non-silly notions concerns which gospels are the oldest and most reliable sources of information about Jesus.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ Most scholars who believe in "Q" actually think there were various versions of the document.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ I'm sort of wondering why, though, this book hasn't been burned at the stake, as most Christians are generally so sensitive and barring to new ideas when their faith is speculated about.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[16]
Giorgio Vasari, in the enlarged edition of Lives of the Artists, 1568,[96] introduced his chapter on Leonardo da Vinci with the following words:
.
In the normal course of events many men and women are born with remarkable talents; but occasionally, in a way that transcends nature, a single person is marvellously endowed by Heaven with beauty, grace and talent in such abundance that he leaves other men far behind, all his actions seem inspired and indeed everything he does clearly comes from God rather than from human skill.^ When the Holy Spirit overshadowed Mary, it was specifically to produce a human nature within her womb for the eternal Son of God to step into, after which he was born as the God–Man (100–percent God and 100–percent man) nine months later.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Contrary to Gnostic teachings, scholar Gary Habermas tells us that "Jesus does not refer to Yahweh as less than the supreme Creator and God of the universe.
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Everything he says, does, thinks, feels - all this happens.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

Everyone acknowledged that this was true of Leonardo da Vinci, an artist of outstanding physical beauty, who displayed infinite grace in everything that he did and who cultivated his genius so brilliantly that all problems he studied he solved with ease.
Statue of Leonardo da Vinci by Luigi Pampaloni, Uffizi
Statue of Leonardo da Vinci at the Uffizi, Florence
The continued admiration that Leonardo commanded from painters, critics and historians is reflected in many other written tributes. Baldassare Castiglione, author of Il Cortegiano ("The Courtier"), wrote in 1528: "... Another of the greatest painters in this world looks down on this art in which he is unequalled ..."[97] while the biographer known as "Anonimo Gaddiano" wrote, c. 1540: "His genius was so rare and universal that it can be said that nature worked a miracle on his behalf ...".[98]
The 19th century brought a particular admiration for Leonardo's genius, causing Henry Fuseli to write in 1801: "Such was the dawn of modern art, when Leonardo da Vinci broke forth with a splendour that distanced former excellence: made up of all the elements that constitute the essence of genius ..."[99] This is echoed by A. E. Rio who wrote in 1861: "He towered above all other artists through the strength and the nobility of his talents."[100]
By the 19th century, the scope of Leonardo's notebooks was known, as well as his paintings. Hippolyte Taine wrote in 1866: "There may not be in the world an example of another genius so universal, so incapable of fulfilment, so full of yearning for the infinite, so naturally refined, so far ahead of his own century and the following centuries."[101]
.The famous art historian Bernard Berenson wrote in 1896: "Leonardo is the one artist of whom it may be said with perfect literalness: Nothing that he touched but turned into a thing of eternal beauty.^ But one prisoner alone cannot find this people or get into touch with them.
  • Mona Lisa's History and Philosophies 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.tapple.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The one thing I feared was that this steaming pile of a novel might get turned into a serviceable thriller.
  • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Whether it be the cross section of a skull, the structure of a weed, or a study of muscles, he, with his feeling for line and for light and shade, forever transmuted it into life-communicating values."[102]
The interest in Leonardo's genius has continued unabated; experts study and translate his writings, analyse his paintings using scientific techniques, argue over attributions and search for works which have been recorded but never found.[103] .Liana Bortolon, writing in 1967, said: "Because of the multiplicity of interests that spurred him to pursue every field of knowledge ...^ Largely because these writings are said to be earlier and thus closer to the real Jesus.
  • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

^ Later, in 1 Corinthians 14:37, Paul said, "If anybody thinks he is a prophet or spiritually gifted, let him acknowledge that what I am writing to you is the Lord's command."
  • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

Leonardo can be considered, quite rightly, to have been the universal genius par excellence, and with all the disquieting overtones inherent in that term. Man is as uncomfortable today, faced with a genius, as he was in the 16th century. Five centuries have passed, yet we still view Leonardo with awe."[10]

See also

About Leonardo

Related subjects

Footnotes

  1. ^ This drawing in red chalk is widely (though not universally) accepted as an original self-portrait. The main reason for hesitation in accepting it as a portrait of Leonardo is that the subject is apparently of a greater age than Leonardo ever achieved. But it is possible that he drew this picture of himself deliberately aged, specifically for Raphael's portrait of him in The School of Athens.
  2. ^ There are 15 significant artworks which are ascribed, either in whole or in large part, to Leonardo by most art historians. This number is made up principally of paintings on panel but includes a mural, a large drawing on paper and two works which are in the early stages of preparation. There are a number of other works that have also been variously attributed to Leonardo.
  3. ^ Modern scientific approaches to metallurgy and engineering were only in their infancy during the Renaissance.
  4. ^ A number of Leonardo's most practical inventions are displayed as working models at the Museum of Vinci.
  5. ^ The third hour of the night was 10:30 pm, three hours after the saying of the Ave Maria.[7]
  6. ^ It has been suggested that Caterina may have been a slave from the Middle East "or at least, from the Mediterranean". According to Alessandro Vezzosi, Head of the Leonardo Museum in Vinci, there is evidence that Piero owned a Middle Eastern slave called Caterina. That Leonardo had Middle Eastern blood is claimed to be supported by the reconstruction of a fingerprint as reported by Marta Falconi, Associated Press Writer, "Experts Reconstruct Leonardo Fingerprint" December 12, 2006", accessed 2010-01-06. The evidence as stated in the article is that 60% of people of Middle Eastern Origin share the pattern of whorls found on the reconstructed fingerprint. The article also states that the claim is refuted by Simon Cole, associate professor of criminology, law and society at the University of California at Irvine. "You can't predict one person's race from these kinds of incidences," he said, especially if looking at only one finger."
  7. ^ The "diverse arts" and technicall skills of Medieval and Renaissance workshops are described in detail in the 12th century text On Divers Arts by Theophilus Presbyter and in the early 15th century text Il Libro Dell'arte O Trattato Della Pittui by Cennino Cennini.
  8. ^ That Leonardo joined the guild before this time is deduced from the record of payment made to the Compagnia di San Luca in the company's register, Libro Rosso A, 1472-1520, Accademia di Belle Arti.[9]
  9. ^ This work is now in the collection of the Uffizi, Drawing No. 8P.
  10. ^ Homosexual acts were illegal in Renaissance Florence.
  11. ^ Verrocchio's statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni was not cast until 1488, after his death, and after Leonardo had already begun work on the statue for Ludovico.
  12. ^ In 2005, the studio was rediscovered during the restoration of part of a building occupied for 100 years by the Department of Military Geography.[30]
  13. ^ Both works are lost. While the entire composition of Michelangelo's painting is known from a copy by Aristotole da Sangallo, 1542.[31] Leonardo's painting is only known from preparatory sketches and several copies of the centre section, of which the best known, and probably least accurate is by Peter Paul Rubens.[32]
  14. ^ D'Oggione is known in part for his contemporary copies of the Last Supper.
  15. ^ It is unknown for what occasion the mechanical lion was made but it is believed to have greeted the King at his entry into Lyon and perhaps was used for the peace talks between the French king and Pope Leo X in Bologna. A conjectural recreated of the lion has been made and is on display in the Museum of Bologna.[38]
  16. ^ Clos Lucé, also called Cloux, is now a public museum.
  17. ^ On the day of Leonardo's death, a royal edict was issued by the King at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, a two-day journey from Clos Lucé. This has been taken as evidence that King François cannot have been present at Leonardo's deathbed. However, White in Leonardo: The First Scientist points out that the edict was not signed by the king himself.
  18. ^ Michael Baxandall lists 5 "laudable conditions" or reactions of Mary to the presence and announcement of the angel. These are: Disquiet, Reflection, Inquiry, Submission and Merit. In this painting Mary's attitude does not comply with any of the accepted traditions.[66]
  19. ^ The painting, which in the 18th century belonged to Angelica Kauffmann, was later cut up. The two main sections were found in a junk shop and cobbler's shop and were reunited.[67] It is probable that outer parts of the composition are missing.
  20. ^ Whether or not Vasari had seen the Mona Lisa is the subject of debate. The opinion that he had not seen the painting is based mainly on the fact that he describes the Mona Lisa as having eyebrows. Daniel Arasse in Leonardo da Vinci discusses the possibility that Leonardo may have painted the figure with eyebrows which were subsequently removed. (They were not fashionable in the mid 16th century.)[16] The analysis of high resolution scans made by Pascal Cotte has revealed that the Mona Lisa had eyebrows and eyelashes which have been subsequently removed.[76]
  21. ^ Jack Wasserman writes of "the inimitable treatment of the surfaces" of this painting.[77]
  22. ^ The "Grecian profile" has a continuous straight line from forehead to nose-tip, the bridge of the nose being exceptionally high. It is a feature of many Classical Greek statues.
  23. ^ Left-handed writers using a split nib or quill pen experience difficulty pushing the pen from left to right across the page.
  24. ^ This method of organisation minimises of loss of data in the case of pages being mixed up or destroyed.

References

  1. ^ a b c Gardner, Helen (1970). Art through the Ages. pp. 450–456. 
  2. ^ a b c Vasari, Boltraffio, Castiglione, "Anonimo" Gaddiano, Berensen, Taine, Fuseli, Rio, Bortolon, etc. See specific quotations under heading "Leonardo, the legend".
  3. ^ Rosci, Marco (1977). Leonardo. p. 8. 
  4. ^ Vitruvian Man is referred to as "iconic" at the following websites and many others:Vitruvian Man, Fine Art Classics, Key Images in the History of Science; Curiosity and difference; The Guardian: The Real da Vinci Code
  5. ^ The Controversial Replica of Leonardo's Adding Machine access date=2010-01-07
  6. ^ See expanded in article Science and inventions of Leonardo da Vinci
  7. ^ a b Vezzosi, Alessandro (1997). .Leonardo da Vinci: Renaissance Man.^ Grand-Daddy Whiskers, M.D. (English) (as Author) The Graymouse Family (English) (as Author) Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

     
  8. ^ a b His birth is recorded in the diary of his paternal grandfather Ser Antonio, as cited by Angela Ottino della Chiesa in Leonardo da Vinci, p.83
  9. ^ a b c d e f g della Chiesa, Angela Ottino (1967). .The Complete Paintings of Leonardo da Vinci.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    p. 83.
     
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Bortolon, Liana (1967). The Life and Times of Leonardo. London: Paul Hamlyn. 
  11. ^ Rosci, p.20
  12. ^ Rosci, p.21
  13. ^ Brigstoke, Hugh (2001). The Oxford Companion the Western Art. 
  14. ^ Vasari, Giorgio (1568). Lives of the Artists. Penguin Classics. pp. 258–9. 
  15. ^ Rosci, p.13
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Arasse, Daniel (1998). .Leonardo da Vinci.^ What did Leonardo da Vinci do to you?
    • Perez Hilton: Woman Loses Her Mind & Attacks The Mona Lisa!!! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC perezhilton.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

     
  17. ^ Rosci, p.27
  18. ^ Martindale, Andrew (1972). The Rise of the Artist. 
  19. ^ Vasari, p.258
  20. ^ della Chiesa, p.88
  21. ^ Priwer, Shana; Phillips, Cynthia (2006). The Everything Da Vinci Book. pp. 245. 
  22. ^ a b Wasserman, Jack (1975). .Leonardo da Vinci.^ What did Leonardo da Vinci do to you?
    • Perez Hilton: Woman Loses Her Mind & Attacks The Mona Lisa!!! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC perezhilton.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    pp. 77–78.
     
  23. ^ Winternitz, Emanuel (1982). .Leonardo Da Vinci As a Musician.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

     
  24. ^ Rossi, Paolo (2001). The Birth of Modern Science. p. 33. 
  25. ^ "Leonardo's Letter to Ludovico Sforza". Leonardo-History. http://www.leonardo-history.com/life.htm?Section=S5. Retrieved 2010-01-05. 
  26. ^ Kemp, Martin (2004). Leonardo. 
  27. ^ Codex II, 95 r, Victoria and Albert Museum, as cited by della Chiesa p. 85
  28. ^ a b c d della Chiesa, p.85
  29. ^ Vasari, p.256
  30. ^ Owen, Richard (2005-01-12). "Found: the studio where Leonardo met Mona Lisa". The Times. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/article411195.ece. Retrieved 2010-01-05. 
  31. ^ Goldscheider, Ludwig (1967). Michelangelo: paintings, sculptures, architecture. Phaidon Press. ISBN 9780714813141. 
  32. ^ della Chiesa, pp.106-107
  33. ^ Gaetano Milanesi, Epistolario Buonarroti, Florence (1875), as cited by della Chiesa.
  34. ^ a b c della Chiesa, p.86
  35. ^ Georges Goyau, François I], Transcribed by Gerald Rossi. The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VI. Published 1909. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved on 2007-10-04
  36. ^ Miranda, Salvador (1998-2007). "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church: Antoine du Prat". http://www.fiu.edu/~mirandas/bios1527-ii.htm. Retrieved 2007-10-04. 
  37. ^ a b Vasari, p.265
  38. ^ "Reconstruction of Leonardo's walking lion" (in Italian). http://www.ancientandautomata.com/ita/lavori/leone.htm. Retrieved 2010-01-05. 
  39. ^ For such images, see Cultural depictions of Leonardo da Vinci.
  40. ^ Vasari, p.270
  41. ^ "Leonardo's will". Leonardo-history. http://www.leonardo-history.com/life.htm?Section=S6. Retrieved 2007-09-28. 
  42. ^ Mario Lucertini, Ana Millan Gasca, Fernando Nicolo. Technological Concepts and Mathematical Models in the Evolution of Modern Engineering Systems. http://books.google.com/books?id=YISIUycS4HgC&pg=PA13&lpg=PA13&dq=leonardo+cellini+francois+philosopher. Retrieved 2007-10-03. 
  43. ^ Rosci, p. 13
  44. ^ a b c d e f Hartt, Frederich (1970). A History of Italian Renaissance Art. pp. 127–333. 
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i Rosci, Leonardo, chapter 1, the historical setting, pp.9-20
  46. ^ a b c Brucker, Gene A. (1969). Renaissance Florence. 
  47. ^ a b c d e Rachum, Ilan (1979). The Renaissance, an Illustrated Encyclopedia. 
  48. ^ Piero della Francesca, On Perspective for Painting (De Prospectiva Pingendi)
  49. ^ Leon Battista Alberti, De Pictura, 1435. On Painting, in English, De Pictura, in Latin
  50. ^ Hartt, pp.391-2
  51. ^ Williamson, Hugh Ross (1974). Lorenzo the Magnificent. 
  52. ^ Vasari, p.253
  53. ^ Vasari, p.257
  54. ^ Eugene Muntz, Leonardo da Vinci Artist, Thinker, and Man of Science (1898), quoted at Leonardo da Vinci's Ethical Vegetarianism
  55. ^ Bambach, Carmen (2003). "Leonardo, Left-Handed Draftsman and Writer". New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art. http://www.metmuseum.org/special/Leonardo_Master_Draftsman/draftsman_left_essay.asp. Retrieved 2009-10-18. 
  56. ^ Sigmund Freud, Eine Kindheitserinnerung des Leonardo da Vinci, (1910)
  57. ^ Michael Rocke, Forbidden Friendships epigraph, p. 148 & N120 p.298
  58. ^ Leonardo, Codex C. 15v, Institut of France. Trans. Richter
  59. ^ della Chiesa, p.84
  60. ^ Gross, Tom. "Mona Lisa Goes Topless". Paintingsdirect.com. http://web.archive.org/web/20070403073656/www.paintingsdirect.com/content/artnews/032001/artnews1.html. Retrieved 2007-09-27. 
  61. ^ Rossiter, Nick (2003-07-04). "Could this be the secret of her smile?". Telegraph.co.UK. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2003/04/07/banr.xml. Retrieved 2007-10-03. 
  62. ^ By the 1490s Leonardo had already been described as a "Divine" painter. His fame is discussed by Daniel Arasse in Leonardo da Vinci, pp.11-15
  63. ^ These qualities of Leonardo's works are discussed by Frederick Hartt in A History of Italian Renaissance Art, pp.387-411.
  64. ^ della Chiesa, pp. 88, 90
  65. ^ a b Berti, Luciano (1971). The Uffizi. pp. 59–62. 
  66. ^ Baxandall, Michael (1974). Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy. pp. 49–56. 
  67. ^ a b Wasserman, pp.104-6
  68. ^ Wasserman, p.108
  69. ^ "The Mysterious Virgin". National Gallery, London. http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/collection/features/potm/2006/may/feature1.htm. Retrieved 2007-09-27. 
  70. ^ Wasserman, p.124
  71. ^ Vasari, p.263
  72. ^ Vasari, p.262
  73. ^ della Chiesa, p.97
  74. ^ della Chiesa, p.98
  75. ^ Vasari, p.267
  76. ^ "The Mona Lisa had brows and lashes". BBC News. October 22, 2007. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/7056041.stm. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  77. ^ Wasserman, p.144
  78. ^ Vasari, p.266
  79. ^ della Chiesa, p.103
  80. ^ Wasserman, p.150
  81. ^ della Chiesa, p.109
  82. ^ a b c d e f g h Popham, A.E. (1946). .The Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci.^ Grand-Daddy Whiskers, M.D. (English) (as Author) The Graymouse Family (English) (as Author) Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is necessary because, though The Da Vinci Code doesn't discuss Gnosticism directly, it does draw from Gnostic writings, and it does speak favorably of the gospels generally known as Gnostic.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

     
  83. ^ della Chiesa, p.102
  84. ^ Vasari, p.261
  85. ^ "Sketches by Leonardo". Turning the Pages. British Library. http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/ttp/ttpbooks.html. Retrieved 2007-09-27. 
  86. ^ Windsor Castle, Royal Library, sheets RL 19073v-19074v and RL 19102 respectively.
  87. ^ O'Malley; Saunders (1982). Leonardo on the Human Body. New York: Dover Publications. 
  88. ^ della Chiesa, p.117
  89. ^ Capra, Fritjof. The Science of Leonardo; Inside the Mind of the Genius of the Renaissance. (New York, Doubleday, 2007)
  90. ^ Roger Masters (1996). Machiavelli, Leonardo and the Science of Power. 
  91. ^ Roger Masters (1998). .Fortune is a River: Leonardo Da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli's Magnificent Dream to Change the Course of Florentine History.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The Da Vinci Code 's purported "history" of early Christian doctrine has everything to do with a thrilling novel and nothing to do with the facts.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

     
  92. ^ The Leonardo Bridge Project
  93. ^ Levy, Daniel S. (October 4, 1999). "Dream of the Master". Time magazine. http://www.vebjorn-sand.com/dreamsofthemaster.html. Retrieved 2007-09-27. 
  94. ^ The U.S. Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), aired in October 2005, a television programme called "Leonardo's Dream Machines", about the building and successful flight of a glider based on Leonardo's design.
  95. ^ see reference to this in section "Old age".
  96. ^ Vasari, p.255
  97. ^ Castiglione, Baldassare (1528). Il Cortegiano. 
  98. ^ "Anonimo Gaddiani", elaborating on Libro di Antonio Billi, 1537–1542
  99. ^ Fuseli, Henry (1801). Lectures. II. 
  100. ^ Rio, A.E. (1861). L'art chrétien. 
  101. ^ Taine, Hippolyte (1866). Voyage en Italie. 
  102. ^ Berenson, Bernard (1896). The Italian Painters of the Renaissance. 
  103. ^ Melinda Henneberger. "ArtNews article about current studies into Leonardo's life and works". Art News Online. http://web.archive.org/web/20060505165842/http://www.artnewsonline.com/currentarticle.cfm?art_id=1240. Retrieved 2010-01-10. 

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    ^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
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    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

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  • Roger Masters (1998). .Fortune is a River: Leonardo Da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli's Magnificent Dream to Change the Course of Florentine History.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The Da Vinci Code 's purported "history" of early Christian doctrine has everything to do with a thrilling novel and nothing to do with the facts.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-452-28090-7.
     
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    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is necessary because, though The Da Vinci Code doesn't discuss Gnosticism directly, it does draw from Gnostic writings, and it does speak favorably of the gospels generally known as Gnostic.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    With Translations, Emendations and a Biographical Introduction
    . Henry Schuman, New York.
     
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    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There's no question in my mind that part of what Christians must do in the face of the Da Vinci challenge is to defend orthodox Christianity.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    Penguin. ISBN 0-14-029681-6.
     
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    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Phoenix Press. ISBN 0-7538-1269.
     
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    ^ This is necessary because, though The Da Vinci Code doesn't discuss Gnosticism directly, it does draw from Gnostic writings, and it does speak favorably of the gospels generally known as Gnostic.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    Jonathan Cape. ISBN 0 224 60462 7.
     
  • Shana Priwer & Cynthia Phillips (2006). .The Everything Da Vinci Book: Explore the Life and Times of the Ultimate Renaissance Man.^ I have read three of the books that refute historical claims of The Da Vinci Code .
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ FAQ: What books on The Da Vinci Code would you recommend?
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ After all, many "anti Da Vinci Code " books have been published already.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    Adams Media. ISBN 1598691015.
     
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    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    Dover. ISBN 0-486-22572-0 and ISBN 0-486-22573-9 (paperback).
      2 volumes. A reprint of the original 1883 edition.
  • Marco Rosci (1977). Leonardo. Bay Books Pty Ltd. ISBN 0858351765. 
  • Paolo Rossi (2001). The Birth of Modern Science. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0631227113. 
  • Bruno Santi (1990). .Leonardo da Vinci.^ What did Leonardo da Vinci do to you?
    • Perez Hilton: Woman Loses Her Mind & Attacks The Mona Lisa!!! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC perezhilton.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Scala / Riverside.
     
  • Theophilus (1963). On Divers Arts. USA: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 9780226794822. 
  • Jack Wasserman (1975). .Leonardo da Vinci.^ What did Leonardo da Vinci do to you?
    • Perez Hilton: Woman Loses Her Mind & Attacks The Mona Lisa!!! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC perezhilton.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Abrams. ISBN 0-8109-0262-1.
     
  • Giorgio Vasari (1568). Lives of the Artists. Penguin Classics, trans. George Bull 1965. ISBN 0-14-044-164-6. 
  • Williamson, Hugh Ross (1974). Lorenzo the Magnificent. Michael Joseph. ISBN 07181 12040. 
  • Emanuel Winternitz (1982). .Leonardo Da Vinci As a Musician.^ Via Giuseppe De Notaris 00197, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Piazza della Repubblica 00185, Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 14 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Via G.B. Morgagni 00161 , Rome (Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport: 15 mi) - view map .
    • Hotels near Rome Leonardo Da Vinci (fuimicino) Airport Rome | Luxury, Boutique and Design Hotels 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.splendia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    USA: Yale University Press. ISBN 9780300026313.
     
  • Alessandro Vezzosi (1997 (English translation)). .Leonardo da Vinci: Renaissance Man.^ Grand-Daddy Whiskers, M.D. (English) (as Author) The Graymouse Family (English) (as Author) Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    Thames & Hudson Ltd, London. ISBN 0-500-30081-X.
     
  • Frank Zollner (2003). .Leonardo da Vinci: The Complete Paintings and Drawings.^ Grand-Daddy Whiskers, M.D. (English) (as Author) The Graymouse Family (English) (as Author) Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wikipedia The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Complete (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 1 (English) (as Author) The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 (English) (as Author) Thoughts on Art and Life (English) (as Author) Leonard, Sterling Andrus, 1888-1931 .
    • Browse By Author: L - Project Gutenberg 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    Taschen. ISBN 3-8228-1734-1 (hardback).
      [The chapter "The Graphic Works" is by Frank Zollner & Johannes Nathan].

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.Leonardo da Vinci (1452-04-151519-05-02) was an Italian Renaissance architect, musician, inventor, engineer, sculptor, and painter.^ Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote .
  • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Leonardo da Vinci's (Self Portrait of Leonardo) .
  • Francesco Bartolozzi - Leonardo da Vinci's Self Portrait of Leonardo 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.artoftheprint.com [Source type: General]

^ History of Art: Renaissance - Leonardo da Vinci .
  • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.His best known work is the painting Mona Lisa.^ His best known work is the painting Mona Lisa .
  • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Mona Lisa and other works .
  • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Mona Lisa and other works, below).
  • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Leonardo Da Vinci
Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci

Contents

Sourced

The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci

These quotes are primarily from the English translation by Jean Paul Richter of 1888

I

.
  • Let no man who is not a Mathematician read the elements of my work.
  • As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so life well used brings happy death.
  • Life well spent is long.
  • Shun those studies in which the work that results dies with the worker.
  • Whoever in discussion adduces authority uses not intellect but rather memory.
  • Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.
  • It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.
  • Necessity is the mistress and guardian of Nature.
  • Human subtlety...will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple or more direct than does nature, because in her inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous.
  • Mechanics is the paradise of the mathematical sciences because by means of it one comes to the fruits of mathematics.
  • I am not to blame for putting forward, in the course of my work on science, any general rule derived from a previous conclusion.
  • The Book of the science of Mechanics must precede the Book of useful inventions.
  • Seeing that I can find no subject specially useful or pleasing— since the men who have come before me have taken for their own every useful or necessary theme— I must do like one who, being poor, comes last to the fair, and can find no other way of providing himself than by taking all the things already seen by other buyers, and not taken but refused by reason of their lesser value.^ We haven't more than an hour before the race begins."
    • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our life is made by the death of others.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Art Quotations by Leonardo da Vinci - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have read many of his works, but nothing of Brown's.
    • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I, then, will load my humble pack with this despised and rejected merchandise, the refuse of so many buyers; and will go about to distribute it, not indeed in great cities, but in the poorer towns, taking such a price as the wares I offer may be worth.
  • I know that many will call this useless work.
  • Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy— on experience, the mistress of their Masters. They go about puffed up and pompous, dressed and decorated with [the fruits], not of their own labours, but of those of others.^ They go about puffed up and pompous, dressed and decorated with [the fruits], not of their own labours, but of those of others.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I, then, will load my humble pack with this despised and rejected merchandise, the refuse of so many buyers; and will go about to distribute it, not indeed in great cities, but in the poorer towns, taking such a price as the wares I offer may be worth.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy— on experience, the mistress of their Masters.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And they will not allow me my own.^ And they will not allow me my own.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They will scorn me as an inventor; but how much more might they— who are not inventors but vaunters and declaimers of the works of others— be blamed.
  • Those men who are inventors and interpreters between Nature and Man, as compared with boasters and declaimers of the works of others, must be regarded and not otherwise esteemed than as the object in front of a mirror, when compared with its image seen in the mirror. For the first is something in itself, and the other nothingness.— Folks little indebted to Nature, since it is only by chance that they wear the human form and without it I might class them with the herds of beasts.
  • Many will think they may reasonably blame me by alleging that my proofs are opposed to the authority of certain men held in the highest reverence by their inexperienced judgments; not considering that my works are the issue of pure and simple experience, who is the one true mistress.^ Many will think they may reasonably blame me by alleging that my proofs are opposed to the authority of certain men held in the highest reverence by their inexperienced judgments; not considering that my works are the issue of pure and simple experience, who is the one true mistress.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It’s amazing how much I know compared to her.
    • Da__Vinci on Xanga 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC da--vinci.xanga.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ For the first is something in itself, and the other nothingness.— Folks little indebted to Nature, since it is only by chance that they wear the human form and without it I might class them with the herds of beasts.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These rules are sufficient to enable you to know the true from the false— and this aids men to look only for things that are possible and with due moderation— and not to wrap yourself in ignorance, a thing which can have no good result, so that in despair you would give yourself up to melancholy.
  • Among all the studies of natural causes and reasons Light chiefly delights the beholder; and among the great features of Mathematics the certainty of its demonstrations is what preeminently (tends to) elevate the mind of the investigator.^ Have you not looked at yourself in a mirror?
    • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because it does not know the true light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They say that if you never give up, you can actually outdo yourself and achieve great things.
    • MONA LISA music, discography, MP3, videos and reviews 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.progarchives.com [Source type: General]

    .Perspective, therefore, must be preferred to all the discourses and systems of human learning.^ Perspective, therefore, must be preferred to all the discourses and systems of human learning.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He addresses these functions through detailed discourses on perspective that include explanations of perspectival systems based on geometry, proportion, and the modulation of light and shade.
    • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Leonardo started to discover the anatomy of the human body at the time he was apprenticed to Andrea del Verrocchio, as his teacher insisted that all his pupils learn anatomy.
    • Leonardo da Vinci biography, information, artwork and auction 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.artandsell.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .In this branch [of science] the beam of light is explained on those methods of demonstration which form the glory not so much of Mathematics as of Physics and are graced with the flowers of both.
  • If the Lord— who is the light of all things— vouchsafe to enlighten me, I will treat of Light; wherefore I will divide the present work into 3 Parts...^ If the Lord— who is the light of all things— vouchsafe to enlighten me, I will treat of Light; wherefore I will divide the present work into 3 Parts...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In this branch [of science] the beam of light is explained on those methods of demonstration which form the glory not so much of Mathematics as of Physics and are graced with the flowers of both.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He was a gifted athlete, a fine musician and a talented singer, who served both Florence and Milan as an impresario of the ceremonial public functions for which those cities were known.
    • The My Hero Project - Leonardo da Vinci 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.myhero.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Linear Perspective, The Perspective of Colour, The Perspective of Disappearance.
  • These rules are of use only in correcting the figures; since every man makes some mistakes in his first compositions and he who knows them not, cannot amend them.^ These rules are of use only in correcting the figures; since every man makes some mistakes in his first compositions and he who knows them not, cannot amend them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Knowing she has only a few minutes to live, Ms. Sawant’s character starts stripping in super slow motion—desperate to send a message to the only man who understands nudity, now that Raj Kapoor is dead.
    • Da Vinci Da Gupt Katha | Random Thoughts of a Demented Mind 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC greatbong.net [Source type: General]

    ^ Since 1726 attempts have been made, unsuccessfully, to restore it; a concerted restoration and conservation program, making use of the latest technology, was begun in 1977 and is reversing some of the damage.

    .But you, knowing your errors, will correct your works and where you find mistakes amend them, and remember never to fall into them again.^ But you, knowing your errors, will correct your works and where you find mistakes amend them, and remember never to fall into them again.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The first time you make it, just add a little syrup at a time until you find your comfort zone, as it goes a long way.
    • Da Vinci Gourmet Sugar Free Flavored Syrups 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www6.netrition.com [Source type: General]

    ^ So...yeah, if you're going to snidely correct someone, at least make sure you know what you are talking about.
    • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .But if you try to apply these rules in composition you will never make an end, and will produce confusion in your works.
  • These rules will enable you to have a free and sound judgment; since good judgment is born of clear understanding, and a clear understanding comes of reasons derived from sound rules, and sound rules are the issue of sound experience— the common mother of all the sciences and arts.^ Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose.
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    ^ But if you try to apply these rules in composition you will never make an end, and will produce confusion in your works.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These rules will enable you to have a free and sound judgment; since good judgment is born of clear understanding, and a clear understanding comes of reasons derived from sound rules, and sound rules are the issue of sound experience— the common mother of all the sciences and arts.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Hence, bearing in mind the precepts of my rules, you will be able, merely by your amended judgment, to criticise and recognise every thing that is out of proportion in a work, whether in the perspective or in the figures or any thing else.
  • Those who are in love with practice without knowledge are like the sailor who gets into a ship without rudder or compass and who never can be certain whether he is going.^ Those who fall in love with practice without science are like a sailor who enters a ship without a helm or a compass, and who never can be certain whither he is going.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence, bearing in mind the precepts of my rules, you will be able, merely by your amended judgment, to criticise and recognise every thing that is out of proportion in a work, whether in the perspective or in the figures or any thing else.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who are in love with practice without knowledge are like the sailor who gets into a ship without rudder or compass and who never can be certain whether he is going.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Practice must always be founded on sound theory, and to this Perspective is the guide and the gateway; and without this nothing can be done well in the matter of drawing.
  • The painter who draws merely by practice and by eye, without any reason, is like a mirror which copies every thing placed in front of it without being conscious of their existence.
  • Here forms, here colours, here the character of every part of the universe are concentrated to a point; and that point is so marvellous a thing ...^ The painter who draws merely by practice and by eye, without any reason, is like a mirror which copies every thing placed in front of it without being conscious of their existence.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Practice should always be based upon a sound knowledge of theory.
    • Art Quotations by Leonardo da Vinci - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Here forms, here colours, here the character of every part of the universe are concentrated to a point; and that point is so marvellous a thing ...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Oh! marvellous, .O stupendous Necessity— by thy laws thou dost compel every effect to be the direct result of its cause, by the shortest path.^ O stupendous Necessity— by thy laws thou dost compel every effect to be the direct result of its cause, by the shortest path.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Incapable of availing thyself of thy vast strength thou hast to abandon a life of stillness and to obey the law which God and time gave to procreative nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These are miracles...
    • Of the eye
  • The eye which turns from a white object in the light of the sun and goes into a less fully lighted place will see everything as dark.
  • The eye— which sees all objects reversed— retains the images for some time.^ And the eye is the target, a lodestone, of these images.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye— which sees all objects reversed— retains the images for some time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of the eye The eye which turns from a white object in the light of the sun and goes into a less fully lighted place will see everything as dark.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This conclusion is proved by the results; because, the eye having gazed at light retains some impression of it.^ This conclusion is proved by the results; because, the eye having gazed at light retains some impression of it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye— which sees all objects reversed— retains the images for some time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    After looking (at it) there remain in the eye images of intense brightness, that make any less brilliant spot seem dark until the eye has lost the last trace of the impression of the stronger light.

II

.
  • A point is not part of a line.
  • The smallest natural point is larger than all mathematical points, and this is proved because the natural point has continuity, and any thing that is continuous is infinitely divisible; but the mathematical point is indivisible because it has no size.
  • Nothing is that which fills no space.^ Nothing is that which fills no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That which occupies no space is nothing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The point, being indivisible, occupies no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If one single point placed in a circle may be the starting point of an infinite number of lines, and the termination of an infinite number of lines, there must be an infinite number of points separable from this point, and these when reunited become one again; whence it follows that the part may be equal to the whole.
  • The point, being indivisible, occupies no space.^ If one single point placed in a circle may be the starting point of an infinite number of lines, and the termination of an infinite number of lines, there must be an infinite number of points separable from this point, and these when reunited become one again; whence it follows that the part may be equal to the whole.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Therefore an infinite number of lines may be conceived of as intersecting each other at a point, which has no dimensions and is only of the thickness (if thickness it may be called) of one single line.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That which occupies no space is nothing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .That which occupies no space is nothing.^ Nothing is that which fills no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That which occupies no space is nothing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The line has in itself neither matter nor substance and may rather be called an imaginary idea than a real object; and this being its nature it occupies no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The limiting surface of one thing is the beginning of another.
  • That which has no limitations, has no form.^ That which has no limitations, has no form.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The limiting surface of one thing is the beginning of another.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A sheet of sketches drawn there in 1508 shows the beginning of a Madonna now lost except in the form of copies, one of which (known as the "Madonna Litta") is at St Petersburg , another in the Poldi-Pezzoli Museum at Milan.

    .The limitations of two conterminous bodies are interchangeably the surface of each.^ The limitations of two conterminous bodies are interchangeably the surface of each.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .All the surfaces of a body are not parts of that body.
  • The line has in itself neither matter nor substance and may rather be called an imaginary idea than a real object; and this being its nature it occupies no space.^ The line has in itself neither matter nor substance and may rather be called an imaginary idea than a real object; and this being its nature it occupies no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That which occupies no space is nothing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The point, being indivisible, occupies no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Therefore an infinite number of lines may be conceived of as intersecting each other at a point, which has no dimensions and is only of the thickness (if thickness it may be called) of one single line.
  • The boundaries of bodies are the least of all things.^ Therefore an infinite number of lines may be conceived of as intersecting each other at a point, which has no dimensions and is only of the thickness (if thickness it may be called) of one single line.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The boundaries of bodies are the least of all things.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A single and distinct luminous body causes stronger relief in the object than a diffused light; as may be seen by comparing one side of a landscape illuminated by the sun, and one overshadowed by clouds, and so illuminated only by the diffused light of the atmosphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The proposition is proved to be true, because the boundary of a thing is a surface, which is not part of the body contained within that surface; nor is it part of the air surrounding that body, but is the medium interposted between the air and the body, as is proved in its place.
  • Drawing is based upon perspective, which is nothing else than a thorough knowledge of the function of the eye.^ The proposition is proved to be true, because the boundary of a thing is a surface, which is not part of the body contained within that surface; nor is it part of the air surrounding that body, but is the medium interposted between the air and the body, as is proved in its place.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The boundaries of bodies are the least of all things.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the surfaces of a body are not parts of that body.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And this function simply consists in receiving in a pyramid the forms and colours of all the objects placed before it.^ And this function simply consists in receiving in a pyramid the forms and colours of all the objects placed before it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Leonardo Da Vinci used a pyramid design to place the woman simply and calmly in the space of the painting.

    ^ Hence, Leonardo conceived the staggering plan of observing all objects in the visible world, recognizing their form and structure, and pictorially describing them exactly as they are.
    • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I say in a pyramid, because there is no object so small that it will not be larger than the spot where these pyramids are received into the eye.^ I say in a pyramid, because there is no object so small that it will not be larger than the spot where these pyramids are received into the eye.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The line has in itself neither matter nor substance and may rather be called an imaginary idea than a real object; and this being its nature it occupies no space.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are no less than 20 books in print that attempt to support or refute the information found in "The Da Vinci Code".
    • Amazon.com: The Da Vinci Code (9780385504201): Dan Brown: Books 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

    .Therefore, if you extend the lines from the edges of each body as they converge you will bring them to a single point, and necessarily the said lines must form a pyramid.
  • Perspective is nothing more than a rational demonstration applied to the consideration of how objects in front of the eye transmit their image to it, by means of a pyramid of lines.^ They said to him, 'Why do you love her more than all of us?'"
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They said to him, "Why do you love her more than all of us?"
    • The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC biblebelievers.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perspective is nothing more than a rational demonstration applied to the consideration of how objects in front of the eye transmit their image to it, by means of a pyramid of lines.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The Pyramid is the name I apply to the lines which, starting from the surface and edges of each object, converge from a distance and meet in a single point.
  • All objects transmit their image to the eye in pyramids, and the nearer to the eye these pyramids are intersected the smaller will the image appear of the objects which cause them.
  • The instant the atmosphere is illuminated it will be filled with an infinite number of images which are produced by the various bodies and colours assembled in it.^ The instant the atmosphere is illuminated it will be filled with an infinite number of images which are produced by the various bodies and colours assembled in it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The body of the atmosphere is full of infinite radiating pyramids produced by the objects existing in it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And the eye is the target, a lodestone, of these images.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And the eye is the target, a lodestone, of these images.
  • That the atmosphere attracts to itself, like a lodestone, all the images of the objects that exist in it, and not their forms merely but their nature may be clearly seen by the sun, which is a hot and luminous body.^ And the eye is the target, a lodestone, of these images.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That the atmosphere attracts to itself, like a lodestone, all the images of the objects that exist in it, and not their forms merely but their nature may be clearly seen by the sun, which is a hot and luminous body.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A single and distinct luminous body causes stronger relief in the object than a diffused light; as may be seen by comparing one side of a landscape illuminated by the sun, and one overshadowed by clouds, and so illuminated only by the diffused light of the atmosphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .All the atmosphere, which is the all-pervading matter, absorbs light and heat, and reflects in itself the image of the source of that heat and splendor and, in each minutest portion, does the same.^ All the atmosphere, which is the all-pervading matter, absorbs light and heat, and reflects in itself the image of the source of that heat and splendor and, in each minutest portion, does the same.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the images of the objects are in every part of the atmosphere It is impossible that the eye should project from itself, by visual rays, the visual virtue, since, as soon as it opens, that front portion [of the eye] which would give rise to this emanation would have to go forth to the object and this it could not do without time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus, by this example, it is clearly proved that every object sends its image to every spot whence the object itself can be seen; and the converse: That the same object may receive in itself all the images of the objects that are in front of it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The north pole does the same as the lode stone shows; and the moon and the other planets, without suffering any diminution, do the same.
  • All bodies together, and each by itself, give off to the surrounding air an infinite number of images which are all-pervading and each complete, each conveying the nature, colour and form of the body which produces it.
  • Every body in light and shade fills the surrounding air with infinite images of itself; and these, by infinite pyramids diffused in the air, represent this body throughout space and on every side.
  • The body of the atmosphere is full of infinite radiating pyramids produced by the objects existing in it.^ The vivacity and brightness of colors in a landscape will never bear any comparison with a landscape in nature when it is illumined by the sun, unless the painting is placed in such a position that it will receive the same light from the sun as does the landscape.
    • Art Quotations by Leonardo da Vinci - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Eric Sorensen shows you how plummeting temperatures are sending chills through nearly every American state and driving up the cost of produce.
    • Leonardo Da Vinci | Related Topics | National Post 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.nationalpost.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Sculpture, a very noble art, is one that does not in the execution require the same supreme ingenuity as the art of painting, since in two most important and difficult particulars, in foreshortening and in light and shade...
    • Art Quotations by Leonardo da Vinci - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    .These intersect and cross each other with independent convergence without interfering with each other and pass through all the surrounding atmosphere; and are of equal force and value— all being equal to each, each to all.^ These intersect and cross each other with independent convergence without interfering with each other and pass through all the surrounding atmosphere; and are of equal force and value— all being equal to each, each to all.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence, if the images of very large bodies have to pass through very small holes, and beyond these holes recover their large size, the lines must necessarily intersect.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Tigris passes through Asia Minor and brings with it the water of three lakes, one after the other of various elevations; the first being Munace and the middle Pallas and the lowest Triton.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And by means of these, images of the body are transmitted everywhere and on all sides, and each receives in itself every minutest portion of the object that produces it.
  • The air is filled with endless images of the objects distributed in it; and all are represented in all, and all in one, and all in each, whence it happens that if two mirrors are placed in such a manner as to face each other exactly, the first will be reflected in the second and the second in the first.^ The first being reflected in the second takes to it the image of itself with all the images represented in it, among which is the image of the second mirror, and so, image within image, they go on to infinity in such a manner as that each mirror has within it a mirror, each smaller than the last and one inside the other.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The air is filled with endless images of the objects distributed in it; and all are represented in all, and all in one, and all in each, whence it happens that if two mirrors are placed in such a manner as to face each other exactly, the first will be reflected in the second and the second in the first.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And by means of these, images of the body are transmitted everywhere and on all sides, and each receives in itself every minutest portion of the object that produces it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The first being reflected in the second takes to it the image of itself with all the images represented in it, among which is the image of the second mirror, and so, image within image, they go on to infinity in such a manner as that each mirror has within it a mirror, each smaller than the last and one inside the other.^ The first being reflected in the second takes to it the image of itself with all the images represented in it, among which is the image of the second mirror, and so, image within image, they go on to infinity in such a manner as that each mirror has within it a mirror, each smaller than the last and one inside the other.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The air is filled with endless images of the objects distributed in it; and all are represented in all, and all in one, and all in each, whence it happens that if two mirrors are placed in such a manner as to face each other exactly, the first will be reflected in the second and the second in the first.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They get all the good ones going.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    .Thus, by this example, it is clearly proved that every object sends its image to every spot whence the object itself can be seen; and the converse: That the same object may receive in itself all the images of the objects that are in front of it.
  • All objects project their whole image and likeness, diffused and mingled in the whole of the atmosphere, opposite to themselves.^ Thus, by this example, it is clearly proved that every object sends its image to every spot whence the object itself can be seen; and the converse: That the same object may receive in itself all the images of the objects that are in front of it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All objects project their whole image and likeness, diffused and mingled in the whole of the atmosphere, opposite to themselves.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That the atmosphere attracts to itself, like a lodestone, all the images of the objects that exist in it, and not their forms merely but their nature may be clearly seen by the sun, which is a hot and luminous body.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The image of every point of the bodily surface, exists in every part of the atmosphere.^ The image of every point of the bodily surface, exists in every part of the atmosphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Here forms, here colours, here the character of every part of the universe are concentrated to a point; and that point is so marvellous a thing ...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .All the images of the objects are in every part of the atmosphere
  • It is impossible that the eye should project from itself, by visual rays, the visual virtue, since, as soon as it opens, that front portion [of the eye] which would give rise to this emanation would have to go forth to the object and this it could not do without time.^ All the images of the objects are in every part of the atmosphere It is impossible that the eye should project from itself, by visual rays, the visual virtue, since, as soon as it opens, that front portion [of the eye] which would give rise to this emanation would have to go forth to the object and this it could not do without time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye— which sees all objects reversed— retains the images for some time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The image of every point of the bodily surface, exists in every part of the atmosphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And this being so, it could not travel so high as the sun in a month's time when the eye wanted to see it.
  • All the rays which convey the images of objects through the air are straight lines.^ All the rays which convey the images of objects through the air are straight lines.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye— which sees all objects reversed— retains the images for some time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And this being so, it could not travel so high as the sun in a month's time when the eye wanted to see it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Hence, if the images of very large bodies have to pass through very small holes, and beyond these holes recover their large size, the lines must necessarily intersect.
  • O neglectful Nature, wherefore art thou thus partial, becoming to some of thy children a tender and benignant mother, to others a most cruel and ruthless stepmother?^ O neglectful Nature, wherefore art thou thus partial, becoming to some of thy children a tender and benignant mother, to others a most cruel and ruthless stepmother?
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence, if the images of very large bodies have to pass through very small holes, and beyond these holes recover their large size, the lines must necessarily intersect.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Most who refuse to take the drugs are holed up in the outer rim of the city and collect and protect art (and other emotion-generating media such as recordings of music) with their lives seeing it as something precious.
    • Mona Lisa 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.oobdoo.org [Source type: General]

    I see thy children given into slavery to others without ever receiving any benefit, and in lieu of any reward for the services they have done for them they are repaid by the severest punishments.
  • The Medici created and destroyed me.

III

.
  • Shadow is not the absence of light, merely the obstruction of the luminous rays by an opaque body.^ Shadow is not the absence of light, merely the obstruction of the luminous rays by an opaque body.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No small hole can so modify the convergence of rays of light as to prevent, at a long distance, the transmission of the true form of the luminous body causing them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The body which is nearest to the light casts the largest shadow, and why?
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Shadow is of the nature of darkness.^ Shadow is of the nature of darkness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Light is of the nature of a luminous body; one conceals and the other reveals.^ Light is of the nature of a luminous body; one conceals and the other reveals.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A single and distinct luminous body causes stronger relief in the object than a diffused light; as may be seen by comparing one side of a landscape illuminated by the sun, and one overshadowed by clouds, and so illuminated only by the diffused light of the atmosphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No small hole can so modify the convergence of rays of light as to prevent, at a long distance, the transmission of the true form of the luminous body causing them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They are always associated and inseparable from all objects.^ They are always associated and inseparable from all objects.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence, Leonardo conceived the staggering plan of observing all objects in the visible world, recognizing their form and structure, and pictorially describing them exactly as they are.
    • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .But shadow is a more powerful agent than light, for it can impede and entirely deprive bodies of their light, while light can never entirely expel shadow from a body, that is from an opaque body.
  • Shadow is the diminution alike of light and of darkness, and stands between darkness and light.
  • A shadow may be infinitely dark, and also of infinite degrees of absence of darkness.^ The beginnings and ends of shadow lie between the light and darkness and may be infinitely diminished and infinitely increased.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A shadow may be infinitely dark, and also of infinite degrees of absence of darkness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shadow is not the absence of light, merely the obstruction of the luminous rays by an opaque body.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The beginnings and ends of shadow lie between the light and darkness and may be infinitely diminished and infinitely increased.^ The beginnings and ends of shadow lie between the light and darkness and may be infinitely diminished and infinitely increased.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A shadow may be infinitely dark, and also of infinite degrees of absence of darkness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shadow is the diminution alike of light and of darkness, and stands between darkness and light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Shadow is the means by which bodies display their form.^ Shadow is the means by which bodies display their form.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The outlines and form of any part of a body in light and shade are indistinct in the shadows and in the high lights; but in the portions between the light and the shadows they are highly conspicuous.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The forms of bodies could not be understood in detail but for shadow.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The forms of bodies could not be understood in detail but for shadow.
  • Shadow partakes of the nature of universal matter.^ Shadow is the means by which bodies display their form.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The forms of bodies could not be understood in detail but for shadow.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shadow partakes of the nature of universal matter.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .All such matters are more powerful in their beginning and grow weaker towards the end, I say at the beginning, whatever their form or condition may be and whether visible or invisible.^ All such matters are more powerful in their beginning and grow weaker towards the end, I say at the beginning, whatever their form or condition may be and whether visible or invisible.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If any man could have discovered the utmost powers of the cannon, in all its various forms and have given such a secret to the Romans, with what rapidity would they have conquered every country and have vanquished every army, and what reward could have been great enough for such a service!
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And this is true knowledge and the legitimate issue of nature; for painting is born of nature— or, to speak more correctly, we will say it is the grandchild of nature; for all visible things are produced by nature, and these her children have given birth to painting.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And it is not from small beginnings that they grow to a great size in time; as it might be a great oak which has a feeble beginning from a small acorn.^ And it is not from small beginnings that they grow to a great size in time; as it might be a great oak which has a feeble beginning from a small acorn.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of those men, who, the older they grow, the more avaricious they become, whereas, having but little time to stay, they should become more liberal.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Surely they knew that it was going south annually for 2/3 of the time to begin with, then for five year stretches.
    • Scotland saves its Mona Lisa but more cash is needed - Scotsman.com News 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC news.scotsman.com [Source type: News]

    .Yet I may say that the oak is most powerful at its beginning, that is where it springs from the earth, which is where it is largest
  • Darkness is absence of light.^ Yet I may say that the oak is most powerful at its beginning, that is where it springs from the earth, which is where it is largest Darkness is absence of light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The beginnings and ends of shadow lie between the light and darkness and may be infinitely diminished and infinitely increased.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Leonardo here refers to the Koran: In the name of the most merciful God.--When the earth shall be shaken by an earthquake; and the earth shall cast forth her burdens; and a man shall say, what aileth her?
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Shadow is diminution of light.
  • Light is the chaser away of darkness.^ Light is the chaser away of darkness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shadow is diminution of light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shadow is the diminution alike of light and of darkness, and stands between darkness and light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Shade is the obstruction of light.^ Shade is the obstruction of light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Primary light is that which falls on objects and causes light and shade.^ Primary light is that which falls on objects and causes light and shade.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A primary shadow is that side of a body on which the light cannot fall.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And derived lights are those portions of a body which are illuminated by the primary light.^ And derived lights are those portions of a body which are illuminated by the primary light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A primary shadow is that side of a body on which the light cannot fall.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The outlines and form of any part of a body in light and shade are indistinct in the shadows and in the high lights; but in the portions between the light and the shadows they are highly conspicuous.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .A primary shadow is that side of a body on which the light cannot fall.
  • The eye can best distinguish the forms of objects when it is placed between the shaded and the illuminated parts.
  • The outlines and form of any part of a body in light and shade are indistinct in the shadows and in the high lights; but in the portions between the light and the shadows they are highly conspicuous.
  • A single and distinct luminous body causes stronger relief in the object than a diffused light; as may be seen by comparing one side of a landscape illuminated by the sun, and one overshadowed by clouds, and so illuminated only by the diffused light of the atmosphere.
  • The body which is nearest to the light casts the largest shadow, and why?^ A single and distinct luminous body causes stronger relief in the object than a diffused light; as may be seen by comparing one side of a landscape illuminated by the sun, and one overshadowed by clouds, and so illuminated only by the diffused light of the atmosphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye can best distinguish the forms of objects when it is placed between the shaded and the illuminated parts.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Light is of the nature of a luminous body; one conceals and the other reveals.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    If an object placed in front of a single light is very close to it you will see that it casts a very large shadow on the opposite wall, and the farther you remove the object from the light the smaller will the image of the shadow become.
  • If you transmit the rays of the sun through a hole in the shape of a star you will see a beautiful effect of perspective in the spot where the sun's rays fall.
  • No small hole can so modify the convergence of rays of light as to prevent, at a long distance, the transmission of the true form of the luminous body causing them.

IV

.
  • I ask how far away the eye can discern a non-luminous body, as, for instance, a mountain.^ I ask how far away the eye can discern a non-luminous body, as, for instance, a mountain.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I find that any luminous body when seen through a dense and thick mist diminishes in proportion to its distance from the eye.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It will be very plainly visible if the sun is behind it; and could be seen at a greater or less distance according to the sun's place in the sky.
  • When you represent in your work shadows which you can only discern with difficulty, and of which you cannot distinguish the edges so that you apprehend them confusedly, you must not make them sharp or definite lest your work should have a wooden effect.
  • A shadow will appear dark in proportion to the brilliancy of the light surrounding it and conversely it will be less conspicuous where it is seen against a darker background.
  • A dark object seen against a bright background will appear smaller than it is.^ Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose.
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A dark object seen against a bright background will appear smaller than it is.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A luminous body will appear more brilliant in proportion as it is surrounded by deeper shadow.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .A light object will look larger when it is seen against a background darker than itself.
  • A luminous body when obscured by a dense atmosphere will appear smaller; as may be seen by the moon or sun veiled by fogs.
  • Of several luminous bodies of equal size and brilliancy and at an equal distance, that will look the largest which is surrounded by the darkest background.
  • I find that any luminous body when seen through a dense and thick mist diminishes in proportion to its distance from the eye.^ A dark object seen against a bright background will appear smaller than it is.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of several luminous bodies of equal size and brilliancy and at an equal distance, that will look the largest which is surrounded by the darkest background.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A luminous body will appear more brilliant in proportion as it is surrounded by deeper shadow.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Thus it is with the sun by day, as well as the moon and the other eternal lights by night.^ Thus it is with the sun by day, as well as the moon and the other eternal lights by night.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Your sun will never set again, and your moon will wane no more; the LORD will be your everlasting light, and your days of sorrow will end" (Isa.
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus will do the same for the future eternal city in which the saints will dwell forever: "The city does not need the sun or the moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and the Lamb is its lamp" (Rev.
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    And when the air is clear, these luminaries appear larger in proportion as they are farther from the eye.
  • A luminous body will appear more brilliant in proportion as it is surrounded by deeper shadow.

VI

  • The variety of colour in objects cannot be discerned at a great distance, excepting in those parts which are directly lighted up by the solar rays.

VII

.
  • Experience shows us that the air must have darkness beyond it and yet it appears blue.^ Experience shows us that the air must have darkness beyond it and yet it appears blue.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If you produce a small quantity of smoke from dry wood and the rays of the sun fall on this smoke, and if you then place behind the smoke a piece of black velvet on which the sun does not shine, you will see that all the smoke which is between the eye and the black stuff will appear of a beautiful blue colour.^ And if instead of the velvet you place a white cloth smoke, that is too thick smoke, hinders, and too thin smoke does not produce, the perfection of this blue colour.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you produce a small quantity of smoke from dry wood and the rays of the sun fall on this smoke, and if you then place behind the smoke a piece of black velvet on which the sun does not shine, you will see that all the smoke which is between the eye and the black stuff will appear of a beautiful blue colour.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Close your eyes, and then look again: what you saw is no longer there; and what you will see later is not yet.
    • Art Quotations by Leonardo da Vinci - The Painter's Keys Resource of Art Quotations 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC quote.robertgenn.com [Source type: General]

    .And if instead of the velvet you place a white cloth smoke, that is too thick smoke, hinders, and too thin smoke does not produce, the perfection of this blue colour.^ And if instead of the velvet you place a white cloth smoke, that is too thick smoke, hinders, and too thin smoke does not produce, the perfection of this blue colour.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you produce a small quantity of smoke from dry wood and the rays of the sun fall on this smoke, and if you then place behind the smoke a piece of black velvet on which the sun does not shine, you will see that all the smoke which is between the eye and the black stuff will appear of a beautiful blue colour.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence a moderate amount of smoke produces the finest blue.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Hence a moderate amount of smoke produces the finest blue.
  • The atmosphere is blue by reason of the darkness above it because black and white make blue.

VIII

  • The sun gives spirit and life to plants and the earth nourishes them with moisture.

IX

.
  • Many are they who have a taste and love for drawing, but no talent; and this will be discernible in boys who are not diligent and never finish their drawings with shading.
  • I myself have proved it to be of no small use, when in bed in the dark, to recall in fancy the external details of forms previously studied, or other noteworthy things conceived by subtle speculation; and this is certainly an admirable exercise, and useful for impressing things on the memory.
  • If you are representing a white body let it be surrounded by ample space, because as white has no colour of its own, it is tinged and altered in some degree by the colour of the objects surrounding it
  • A picture or representation of human figures, ought to be done in such a way as that the spectator may easily recognise, by means of their attitudes, the purpose in their minds. Thus, if you have to represent a man of noble character in the act of speaking, let his gestures be such as naturally accompany good words; and, in the same way, if you wish to depict a man of a brutal nature, give him fierce movements; as with his arms flung out towards the listener, and his head and breast thrust forward beyond his feet, as if following the speaker's hands.^ Describe what you taste in the wine in terms of other things you have experienced.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ You say “to care for others”, but to what purpose?
    • They Whip Themselves, Don‚Äôt They? — || The Da Vinci Code & Opus Dei || Archive 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC davincicode-opusdei.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you are representing a white body let it be surrounded by ample space, because as white has no colour of its own, it is tinged and altered in some degree by the colour of the objects surrounding it A picture or representation of human figures, ought to be done in such a way as that the spectator may easily recognise, by means of their attitudes, the purpose in their minds.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Thus it is with a deaf and dumb person who, when he sees two men in conversation— although he is deprived of hearing— can nevertheless understand, from the attitudes and gestures of the speakers, the nature of their discussion.
  • When you wish to represent a man speaking to a number of people, consider the matter of which he has to treat and adapt his action to the subject. Thus, if he speaks persuasively, let his action be appropriate to it.^ Thus, if he speaks persuasively, let his action be appropriate to it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When you wish to represent a man speaking to a number of people, consider the matter of which he has to treat and adapt his action to the subject.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus it is with a deaf and dumb person who, when he sees two men in conversation— although he is deprived of hearing— can nevertheless understand, from the attitudes and gestures of the speakers, the nature of their discussion.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If the matter in hand be to set forth an argument, let the speaker, with the fingers of the right hand hold one finger of the left hand, having the two smaller ones closed; and his face alert, and turned towards the people with mouth a little open, to look as though he spoke; and if he is sitting let him appear as though about to rise, with his head forward.^ Leonardo appears to have been left-handed.

    ^ If the matter in hand be to set forth an argument, let the speaker, with the fingers of the right hand hold one finger of the left hand, having the two smaller ones closed; and his face alert, and turned towards the people with mouth a little open, to look as though he spoke; and if he is sitting let him appear as though about to rise, with his head forward.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One's thoughts turn towards Hope.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If you represent him standing make him leaning slightly forward with body and head towards the people.^ If you represent him standing make him leaning slightly forward with body and head towards the people.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus, if you have to represent a man of noble character in the act of speaking, let his gestures be such as naturally accompany good words; and, in the same way, if you wish to depict a man of a brutal nature, give him fierce movements; as with his arms flung out towards the listener, and his head and breast thrust forward beyond his feet, as if following the speaker's hands.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When you wish to represent a man speaking to a number of people, consider the matter of which he has to treat and adapt his action to the subject.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These you must represent as silent and attentive, all looking at the orator's face with gestures of admiration; and make some old men in astonishment at the things they hear, with the corners of their mouths pulled down and drawn in, their cheeks full of furrows, and their eyebrows raised, and wrinkling the forehead where they meet.
  • The motions of men must be such as suggest their dignity or their baseness.
  • Represent your figures in such action as may be fitted to express what purpose is in the mind of each; otherwise your art will not be admirable.
  • What is fair in men, passes away, but not so in art.
  • If you condemn painting, which is the only imitator of all visible works of nature, you will certainly despise a subtle invention which brings philosophy and subtle speculation to the consideration of the nature of all forms— seas and plains, trees, animals, plants and flowers— which are surrounded by shade and light.^ You only have to look at your family life!
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The motions of men must be such as suggest their dignity or their baseness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who despise painting "despise an invention that considers all qualities of forms philosophically and with subtle deliberation: air and landscapes , plants, animals, herbs and flowers girdled by shadow and light."
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC everything2.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And this is true knowledge and the legitimate issue of nature; for painting is born of nature— or, to speak more correctly, we will say it is the grandchild of nature; for all visible things are produced by nature, and these her children have given birth to painting.^ And this is true knowledge and the legitimate issue of nature; for painting is born of nature— or, to speak more correctly, we will say it is the grandchild of nature; for all visible things are produced by nature, and these her children have given birth to painting.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Christ all of these things (1 Cor.
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I owe to Professor Sche'fer, Membre de l'Institut, the information that he is in possession of a manuscript in which the text is fuller, and more correctly given.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Hence we may justly call it the grandchild of nature and related to God.
  • The eye, which is called the window of the soul, is the principal means by which the central sense can most completely and abundantly appreciate the infinite works of nature; and the ear is the second, which acquires dignity by hearing of the things the eye has seen.^ Hence we may justly call it the grandchild of nature and related to God.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye, which is called the window of the soul, is the principal means by which the central sense can most completely and abundantly appreciate the infinite works of nature; and the ear is the second, which acquires dignity by hearing of the things the eye has seen.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye is the window of the soul.
    • LEONARDO DA VINCI, By MAURICE W. BROCKWELL 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If you, historians, or poets, or mathematicians had not seen things with your eyes you could not report of them in writing.^ If you, historians, or poets, or mathematicians had not seen things with your eyes you could not report of them in writing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Homolle is reported to have laughed at the possibility of theft from the Louvre and was quoted as saying: "You might as well pretend that one could steal the towers of Notre Dame!"
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    ^ And if you, O poet, tell a story with your pen, the painter with his brush can tell it more easily, with simpler completeness and less tedious to be understood.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And if you, O poet, tell a story with your pen, the painter with his brush can tell it more easily, with simpler completeness and less tedious to be understood.^ And if you, O poet, tell a story with your pen, the painter with his brush can tell it more easily, with simpler completeness and less tedious to be understood.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you, historians, or poets, or mathematicians had not seen things with your eyes you could not report of them in writing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And if you call painting dumb poetry, the painter may call poetry blind painting.^ And if you call painting dumb poetry, the painter may call poetry blind painting.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You may not be an artist, and your work may not call upon your eyesight and appreciation of light and colour, but developing your sight is a skill that will benefit you in many ways.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    .Now which is the worse defect?^ Now which is the worse defect?
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    to be blind or dumb? .Though the poet is as free as the painter in the invention of his fictions they are not so satisfactory to men as paintings; for, though poetry is able to describe forms, actions and places in words, the painter deals with the actual similitude of the forms, in order to represent them.^ Though the poet is as free as the painter in the invention of his fictions they are not so satisfactory to men as paintings; for, though poetry is able to describe forms, actions and places in words, the painter deals with the actual similitude of the forms, in order to represent them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence, Leonardo conceived the staggering plan of observing all objects in the visible world, recognizing their form and structure, and pictorially describing them exactly as they are.
    • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ And if you call painting dumb poetry, the painter may call poetry blind painting.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Now tell me which is the nearer to the actual man: the name of man or the image of the man.^ Now tell me which is the nearer to the actual man: the name of man or the image of the man.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    The name of man differs in different countries, but his form is never changed but by death.
  • The painter strives and competes with nature.

X

.
  • We, by our arts may be called the grandsons of God.
  • Obstacles cannot crush me.^ We, by our arts may be called the grandsons of God.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Obstacles cannot crush me.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence we may justly call it the grandchild of nature and related to God.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Every obstacle yields to stern resolve.^ Every obstacle yields to stern resolve.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Obstacles cannot crush me Every obstacle yields to stern resolve He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
  • Ivy is of longevity.^ He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Obstacles cannot crush me Every obstacle yields to stern resolve He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Variant: Ivy is [a type] of longevity.
  • Fire destroys falsehood, that is sophistry, and restores truth, driving out darkness.
  • Fire may be represented as the destroyer of all sophistry, and as the image and demonstration of truth; because it is light and drives out darkness which conceals all essences [or subtle things].
  • Fire destroys all sophistry, that is deceit; and maintains truth alone, that is gold.
  • Truth at last cannot be hidden.^ Fire is to represent truth because it destroys all sophistry and lies; and the mask is for lying and falsehood which conceal truth.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Fire destroys all sophistry, that is deceit; and maintains truth alone, that is gold.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Fire may be represented as the destroyer of all sophistry, and as the image and demonstration of truth; because it is light and drives out darkness which conceals all essences [or subtle things].
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Dissimulation is of no avail.^ Dissimulation is of no avail.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Dissimulation is to no purpose before so great a judge.^ Dissimulation is to no purpose before so great a judge.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Falsehood puts on a mask.^ Falsehood puts on a mask.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Nothing is hidden under the sun.
  • Fire is to represent truth because it destroys all sophistry and lies; and the mask is for lying and falsehood which conceal truth.
  • Movement will cease before we are weary of being useful.
  • Movement will fail sooner than usefulness.
  • When the sun appears which dispels darkness in general, you put out the light which dispelled it for you in particular for your need and convenience.
  • Constancy does not begin, but is that which perseveres.
  • Love, Fear, and Esteem,— Write these on three stones.^ Fire is to represent truth because it destroys all sophistry and lies; and the mask is for lying and falsehood which conceal truth.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Fire destroys all sophistry, that is deceit; and maintains truth alone, that is gold.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Movement will fail sooner than usefulness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Of servants"
  • Fame alone raises herself to Heaven, because virtuous things are in favour with God.
  • Disgrace should be represented upside down, because all her deeds are contrary to God and tend to hell.
  • Nothing is so much to be feared as Evil Report.
  • I am still hopeful.^ Fame alone raises herself to Heaven, because virtuous things are in favour with God.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I hope we all lead to one destination- Heaven, homecoming with God.
    • They Whip Themselves, Don‚Äôt They? — || The Da Vinci Code & Opus Dei || Archive 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC davincicode-opusdei.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Disgrace should be represented upside down, because all her deeds are contrary to God and tend to hell.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    A falcon, Time. .But the coincidence is probably accidental.
  • Truth here makes Falsehood torment lying tongues.
  • Such as harm is when it hurts me not, is good which avails me not.
  • He who offends others, does not secure himself.
  • One's thoughts turn towards Hope.^ He who offends others, does not secure himself.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One's thoughts turn towards Hope.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But the coincidence is probably accidental.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • By the side of this passage is a sketch of a cage with a bird sitting in it.

XI

.
  • If you wish to make a figure in marble, first make one of clay, and when you have finished it, let it dry and place it in a case which should be large enough, after the figure is taken out of it, to receive also the marble, from which you intend to reveal the figure in imitation of the one in clay.
  • Sculptured figures which appear in motion, will, in their standing position, actually look as if they were falling forward.
  • To manage the large mould make a model of the small mould, make a small room in proportion.
  • Of the horse I will say nothing because I know the times.
    • This relates to a huge equestrian statue that Leonardo had been commissioned to design and create, but which was never cast until over 500 years later, in 1999, when two huge statues based upon his design were finally made.^ Sculptured figures which appear in motion, will, in their standing position, actually look as if they were falling forward.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I should have never allowed you to proceed with all this in the first place.
      • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ If you wish to make a figure in marble, first make one of clay, and when you have finished it, let it dry and place it in a case which should be large enough, after the figure is taken out of it, to receive also the marble, from which you intend to reveal the figure in imitation of the one in clay.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      (c.1497)

XIV

.
  • The Common Sense, is that which judges of things offered to it by the other senses.^ The Common Sense, is that which judges of things offered to it by the other senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And this name of Common Sense is given to it solely because it is the common judge of all the other five senses i.e.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The ancient speculators have concluded that that part of man which constitutes his judgment is caused by a central organ to which the other five senses refer everything by means of impressibility; and to this centre they have given the name Common Sense.^ And this name of Common Sense is given to it solely because it is the common judge of all the other five senses i.e.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The ancient speculators have concluded that that part of man which constitutes his judgment is caused by a central organ to which the other five senses refer everything by means of impressibility; and to this centre they have given the name Common Sense.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This Common Sense is acted upon by means of Sensation which is placed as a medium between it and the senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And they say that this Sense is situated in the centre of the head between Sensation and Memory.^ And they say that this Sense is situated in the centre of the head between Sensation and Memory.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This Common Sense is acted upon by means of Sensation which is placed as a medium between it and the senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In time it stands between the past and future and has no existence in the present; and thus in speech it is one of the things of which we say: They are not, or they are impossible.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And this name of Common Sense is given to it solely because it is the common judge of all the other five senses i.e. Seeing, Hearing, Touch, Taste and Smell.^ And this name of Common Sense is given to it solely because it is the common judge of all the other five senses i.e.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Common Sense, is that which judges of things offered to it by the other senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The ancient speculators have concluded that that part of man which constitutes his judgment is caused by a central organ to which the other five senses refer everything by means of impressibility; and to this centre they have given the name Common Sense.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This Common Sense is acted upon by means of Sensation which is placed as a medium between it and the senses.^ This Common Sense is acted upon by means of Sensation which is placed as a medium between it and the senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sensation is acted upon by means of the images of things presented to it by the external instruments, that is to say the senses which are the medium between external things and Sensation.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The proposition is proved to be true, because the boundary of a thing is a surface, which is not part of the body contained within that surface; nor is it part of the air surrounding that body, but is the medium interposted between the air and the body, as is proved in its place.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Sensation is acted upon by means of the images of things presented to it by the external instruments, that is to say the senses which are the medium between external things and Sensation.^ This Common Sense is acted upon by means of Sensation which is placed as a medium between it and the senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sensation is acted upon by means of the images of things presented to it by the external instruments, that is to say the senses which are the medium between external things and Sensation.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Surrounding things transmit their images to the senses and the senses transfer them to the Sensation.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .In the same way the senses are acted upon by objects.^ In the same way the senses are acted upon by objects.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This Common Sense is acted upon by means of Sensation which is placed as a medium between it and the senses.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sensation is acted upon by means of the images of things presented to it by the external instruments, that is to say the senses which are the medium between external things and Sensation.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Surrounding things transmit their images to the senses and the senses transfer them to the Sensation.^ Surrounding things transmit their images to the senses and the senses transfer them to the Sensation.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sensation is acted upon by means of the images of things presented to it by the external instruments, that is to say the senses which are the medium between external things and Sensation.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Sensation sends them to the Common Sense, and by it they are stamped upon the memory and are there more or less retained according to the importance or force of the impression.
  • Though human ingenuity may make various inventions which, by the help of various machines answering the same end, it will never devise any inventions more beautiful, nor more simple, nor more to the purpose than Nature does; because in her inventions nothing is wanting, and nothing is superfluous, and she needs no counterpoise when she makes limbs proper for motion in the bodies of animals.^ It begins: "Although the human mind makes various inventions and finds various instruments to answer the same purpose, it will never find inventions more beautiful, simple, and economical than those of nature; in her inventions nothing is missing; nothing superfluous..."
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC everything2.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Though human ingenuity may make various inventions which, by the help of various machines answering the same end, it will never devise any inventions more beautiful, nor more simple, nor more to the purpose than Nature does; because in her inventions nothing is wanting, and nothing is superfluous, and she needs no counterpoise when she makes limbs proper for motion in the bodies of animals.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sensation sends them to the Common Sense, and by it they are stamped upon the memory and are there more or less retained according to the importance or force of the impression.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But she puts into them the soul of the body, which forms them that is the soul of the mother which first constructs in the womb the form of the man and in due time awakens the soul that is to inhabit it.
  • The soul seems to reside in the judgment, and the judgment would seem to be seated in that part where all the senses meet; and this is called the Common Sense and is not all-pervading throughout the body, as many have thought.^ All the ills that are or ever were, if they could be set to work by him, would not satisfy the desires of his iniquitous soul; and I could not in any length of time describe his nature to you, but I conclude...
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ From observing the static structure, Leonardo proceeded to study the functions exercised by the individual parts of the body as they bring into play the organism's mechanical activity.
    • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ All part of the riches in your abundant universe, so do take time to enjoy them.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    .Rather is it entirely in one part.^ Rather is it entirely in one part.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Because, if it were all-pervading and the same in every part, there would have been no need to make the instruments of the senses meet in one centre and in one single spot; on the contrary it would have sufficed that the eye should fulfil the function of its sensation on its surface only, and not transmit the image of the things seen, to the sense, by means of the optic nerves, so that the soul— for the reason given above— may perceive it in the surface of the eye.
  • King of the animals— as thou hast described him— I should rather say king of the beasts, thou being the greatest— because thou hast spared slaying them, in order that they may give thee their children for the benefit of the gullet, of which thou hast attempted to make a sepulchre for all animals; and I would say still more, if it were allowed me to speak the entire truth .^ No NTCH, that's not the same one.
    • Mona Lisa is smiling! New finds....1877 dime! 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC forum.treasurenet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Because, if it were all-pervading and the same in every part, there would have been no need to make the instruments of the senses meet in one centre and in one single spot; on the contrary it would have sufficed that the eye should fulfil the function of its sensation on its surface only, and not transmit the image of the things seen, to the sense, by means of the optic nerves, so that the soul— for the reason given above— may perceive it in the surface of the eye.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And there’s also no reason to insult Mary.
    • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

    But we do not go outside human matters in telling of one supreme wickedness, which does not happen among the animals of the earth, inasmuch as among them are found none who eat their own kind, unless through want of sense.
  • Our life is made by the death of others.

XV

.
  • The earth is not in the centre of the Sun's orbit nor at the centre of the universe, but in the centre of its companion elements, and united with them.^ The earth is not in the centre of the Sun's orbit nor at the centre of the universe, but in the centre of its companion elements, and united with them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The earth is not in the middle of the circle of the sun nor in the middle of the world but rather in the middle of its elements..."
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC everything2.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And any one standing on the moon, when it and the sun are both beneath us, would see this our earth and the element of water upon it just as we see the moon, and the earth would light it as it lights us.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    And any one standing on the moon, when it and the sun are both beneath us, would see this our earth and the element of water upon it just as we see the moon, and the earth would light it as it lights us.

XVI

.
  • And if you should say that the shells were carried by the waves, being empty and dead, I say that where the dead went they were not far removed from the living; for in these mountains living ones are found, which are recognisable by the shells being in pairs; and they are in a layer where there are no dead ones; and a little higher up they are found, where they were thrown by the waves, all the dead ones with their shells separated, near to where the rivers fell into the sea, to a great depth; like the Arno which fell from the Gonfolina near to Monte Lupo, where it left a deposit of gravel which may still be seen, and which has agglomerated; and of stones of various districts, natures, and colours and hardness, making one single conglomerate.^ They say all the right words, and make the right faces.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ There are gospels among the "Dead Sea Scrolls" that "were found in the 1950s."
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ They get all the good ones going.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    .And a little beyond the sandstone conglomerate a tufa has been formed, where it turned towards Castel Florentino; farther on, the mud was deposited in which the shells lived, and which rose in layers according to the levels at which the turbid Arno flowed into that sea.^ And a little beyond the sandstone conglomerate a tufa has been formed, where it turned towards Castel Florentino; farther on, the mud was deposited in which the shells lived, and which rose in layers according to the levels at which the turbid Arno flowed into that sea.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And if you should say that the shells were carried by the waves, being empty and dead, I say that where the dead went they were not far removed from the living; for in these mountains living ones are found, which are recognisable by the shells being in pairs; and they are in a layer where there are no dead ones; and a little higher up they are found, where they were thrown by the waves, all the dead ones with their shells separated, near to where the rivers fell into the sea, to a great depth; like the Arno which fell from the Gonfolina near to Monte Lupo, where it left a deposit of gravel which may still be seen, and which has agglomerated; and of stones of various districts, natures, and colours and hardness, making one single conglomerate.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And from time to time the bottom of the sea was raised, depositing these shells in layers, as may be seen in the cutting at Colle Gonzoli, laid open by the Arno which is wearing away the base of it; in which cutting the said layers of shells are very plainly to be seen in clay of a bluish colour, and various marine objects are found there.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And from time to time the bottom of the sea was raised, depositing these shells in layers, as may be seen in the cutting at Colle Gonzoli, laid open by the Arno which is wearing away the base of it; in which cutting the said layers of shells are very plainly to be seen in clay of a bluish colour, and various marine objects are found there.^ And from time to time the bottom of the sea was raised, depositing these shells in layers, as may be seen in the cutting at Colle Gonzoli, laid open by the Arno which is wearing away the base of it; in which cutting the said layers of shells are very plainly to be seen in clay of a bluish colour, and various marine objects are found there.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And if you should say that the shells were carried by the waves, being empty and dead, I say that where the dead went they were not far removed from the living; for in these mountains living ones are found, which are recognisable by the shells being in pairs; and they are in a layer where there are no dead ones; and a little higher up they are found, where they were thrown by the waves, all the dead ones with their shells separated, near to where the rivers fell into the sea, to a great depth; like the Arno which fell from the Gonfolina near to Monte Lupo, where it left a deposit of gravel which may still be seen, and which has agglomerated; and of stones of various districts, natures, and colours and hardness, making one single conglomerate.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And a little beyond the sandstone conglomerate a tufa has been formed, where it turned towards Castel Florentino; farther on, the mud was deposited in which the shells lived, and which rose in layers according to the levels at which the turbid Arno flowed into that sea.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And if the earth of our hemisphere is indeed raised by so much higher than it used to be, it must have become by so much lighter by the waters which it lost through the rift between Gibraltar and Ceuta; and all the more the higher it rose, because the weight of the waters which were thus lost would be added to the earth in the other hemisphere.^ And if the earth of our hemisphere is indeed raised by so much higher than it used to be, it must have become by so much lighter by the waters which it lost through the rift between Gibraltar and Ceuta; and all the more the higher it rose, because the weight of the waters which were thus lost would be added to the earth in the other hemisphere.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Man has much power of discourse which for the most part is vain and false; animals have but little, but it is useful and true, and a small truth is better than a great lie.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Man's desire to raise himself above that which has been naturally provided for him serves here as more of a curse than a blessing.
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC everything2.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    And if the shells had been carried by the muddy deluge they would have been mixed up, and separated from each other amidst the mud, and not in regular steps and layers — as we see them now in our time.

XVII

.
  • Men born in hot countries love the night because it refreshes them and have a horror of light because it burns them; and therefore they are of the colour of night, that is black.^ Men born in hot countries love the night because it refreshes them and have a horror of light because it burns them; and therefore they are of the colour of night, that is black.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The lyrics are as follows: Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa, men have named you You are so like the lady with the mystic smile It is only because you are lonely that they blame you?
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    And in cold countries it is just the contrary.

XIX

.
  • I obey Thee Lord, first for the love I ought, in all reason to bear Thee; secondly for that Thou canst shorten or prolong the lives of men.
  • O admirable impartiality of Thine, Thou first Mover; Thou hast not permitted that any force should fail of the order or quality of its necessary results.
  • Necessity is the mistress and guide of nature.
  • Necessity is the theme and the inventress, the eternal curb and law of nature.
  • In many cases one and the same thing is attracted by two strong forces, namely Necessity and Potency.^ In many cases one and the same thing is attracted by two strong forces, namely Necessity and Potency.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Leonardo anticipated Darwin: "Necessity is the mistress and teacher of nature, it is the theme and inspiration of nature, its curb and eternal regulator."
    • HHF Factpaper: Leonardo da Vinci: Artist, Humanist, Scientist, Jew[?] 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.hebrewhistory.info [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Necessity is the theme and the inventress, the eternal curb and law of nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Water falls in rain; the earth absorbs it from the necessity for moisture; and the sun evaporates it, not from necessity, but by its power.
  • Weight, force and casual impulse, together with resistance, are the four external powers in which all the visible actions of mortals have their being and their end.
  • Our body is dependent on heaven and heaven on the Spirit.
  • The motive power is the cause of all life.
  • O Man, who will discern in this work of mine the wonderful works of Nature, if you think it would be a criminal thing to destroy it, reflect how much more criminal it is to take the life of a man; and if this, his external form, appears to thee marvellously constructed, remember that it is nothing as compared with the soul that dwells in that structure; for that indeed, be it what it may, is a thing divine.^ It’s amazing how much I know compared to her.
    • Da__Vinci on Xanga 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC da--vinci.xanga.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The power of recommendation is all about you.
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    ^ O Man, who will discern in this work of mine the wonderful works of Nature, if you think it would be a criminal thing to destroy it, reflect how much more criminal it is to take the life of a man; and if this, his external form, appears to thee marvellously constructed, remember that it is nothing as compared with the soul that dwells in that structure; for that indeed, be it what it may, is a thing divine.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Leave it then to dwell in His work at His good will and pleasure, and let not your rage or malice destroy a life— for indeed, he who does not value it, does not himself deserve it.
  • The part always has a tendency to reunite with its whole in order to escape from its imperfection.
  • Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than with the imagination being awake?
  • The senses are of the earth; Reason, stands apart in contemplation.
  • Every action needs to be prompted by a motive.^ Every action needs to be prompted by a motive.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than with the imagination being awake?
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Leave it then to dwell in His work at His good will and pleasure, and let not your rage or malice destroy a life— for indeed, he who does not value it, does not himself deserve it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .To know and to will are two operations of the human mind.^ To know and to will are two operations of the human mind.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Discerning, judging, deliberating are acts of the human mind.
  • All our knowledge has its origin in our perceptions.
  • Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past; prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass, though but slowly.
  • Experience, the interpreter between formative nature and the human race, teaches how that nature acts among mortals; and being constrained by necessity cannot act otherwise than as reason, which is its helm, requires her to act.
  • Wisdom is the daughter of experience.
  • Nature is full of infinite causes that have never occurred in experience.
  • Truth was the only daughter of Time.
  • Experience never errs; it is only your judgments that err by promising themselves effects such as are not caused by your experiments.
  • Experience does not err; only your judgments err by expecting from her what is not in her power.^ Discerning, judging, deliberating are acts of the human mind.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nature is full of infinite causes that have never occurred in experience.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past; prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass, though but slowly.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Men wrongly complain of Experience; with great abuse they accuse her of leading them astray but they set Experience aside, turning from it with complaints as to our ignorance causing us to be carried away by vain and foolish desires to promise ourselves, in her name, things that are not in her power; saying that she is fallacious.^ Men wrongly complain of Experience; with great abuse they accuse her of leading them astray but they set Experience aside, turning from it with complaints as to our ignorance causing us to be carried away by vain and foolish desires to promise ourselves, in her name, things that are not in her power; saying that she is fallacious.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of dreams There will be many who will eagerly and with great care and solicitude follow up a thing, which, if they only knew its malignity, would always terrify them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Caladrius is a bird of which it is related that, when it is carried into the presence of a sick person, if the sick man is going to die, the bird turns away its head and never looks at him; but if the sick man is to be saved the bird never loses sight of him but is the cause of curing him of all his sickness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Men are unjust in complaining of innocent Experience, constantly accusing her of error and of false evidence.
  • Every instrument requires to be made by experience.
  • The man who blames the supreme certainty of mathematics feeds on confusion, and can never silence the contradictions of sophistical sciences which lead to an eternal quackery.
  • There is no certainty in sciences where one of the mathematical sciences cannot be applied, or which are not in relation with these mathematics.
  • Any one who in discussion relies upon authority uses, not his understanding, but rather his memory.^ The man who blames the supreme certainty of mathematics feeds on confusion, and can never silence the contradictions of sophistical sciences which lead to an eternal quackery.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Any one who in discussion relies upon authority uses, not his understanding, but rather his memory.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Every instrument requires to be made by experience.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Good culture is born of a good disposition; and since the cause is more to be praised than the effect, I will rather praise a good disposition without culture, than good culture without the disposition.
  • Science is the captain, and practice the soldiers.
  • Those who fall in love with practice without science are like a sailor who enters a ship without a helm or a compass, and who never can be certain whither he is going.
  • Now you see that the hope and the desire of returning home and to one's former state is like the moth to the light, and that the man who with constant longing awaits with joy each new spring time, each new summer, each new month and new year— deeming that the things he longs for are ever too late in coming— does not perceive that he is longing for his own destruction.^ Those who fall in love with practice without science are like a sailor who enters a ship without a helm or a compass, and who never can be certain whither he is going.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who see when they are shown.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Visual Artist | Juggle.com 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.juggle.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Good culture is born of a good disposition; and since the cause is more to be praised than the effect, I will rather praise a good disposition without culture, than good culture without the disposition.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But this desire is the very quintessence, the spirit of the elements, which finding itself imprisoned with the soul is ever longing to return from the human body to its giver.^ We human beings are a union of body and spirit.
    • They Whip Themselves, Don‚Äôt They? — || The Da Vinci Code & Opus Dei || Archive 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC davincicode-opusdei.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But this desire is the very quintessence, the spirit of the elements, which finding itself imprisoned with the soul is ever longing to return from the human body to its giver.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This evil God of the Jews, who favored the Jews, seeks to impede human souls from returning to God and returning to the Divine.
    • The Da Vinci Code Debunked 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC debunkingdavinci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And you must know that this same longing is that quintessence, inseparable from nature, and that man is the image of the world.
  • O Time!^ And you must know that this same longing is that quintessence, inseparable from nature, and that man is the image of the world.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As any astrological symbologist will tell you, the Piscean ideal believes that man must be told what to do by higher powers because man is incapable of thinking for himself .
    • The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC biblebelievers.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The man who carried in his brain so many images of subtle beauty, as well as so much of the hidden science of the future, must have lived spiritually, in the main, alone.

    consumer of all things; O envious age! thou dost destroy all things and devour all things with the relentless teeth of years, little by little in a slow death.
    .Helen, when she looked in her mirror, seeing the withered wrinkles made in her face by old age, wept and wondered why she had twice been carried away.
  • O sleepers!^ Helen, when she looked in her mirror, seeing the withered wrinkles made in her face by old age, wept and wondered why she had twice been carried away.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They are also related to anatomical-physiological studies, in which old age--with wrinkled skin and bulging tendons--is contrasted with youth.
    • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ And this I did also, because that Giovanni, the German who makes the mirrors, was there always in the workshop, and wanted to see and to know all that was being done there and made it known outside ...
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    what a thing is slumber! .Sleep resembles death.^ Sleep resembles death.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Ah, why then dost thou not work in such wise as that after death thou mayst retain a resemblance to perfect life, when, during life, thou art in sleep so like to the hapless dead?
  • The knowledge of past times and of the places on the earth is both an ornament and nutriment to the human mind.
  • To lie is so vile, that even if it were in speaking well of godly things it would take off something from God's grace; and Truth is so excellent, that if it praises but small things they become noble.
  • Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness; and this truth is in itself so excellent that, even when it dwells on humble and lowly matters, it is still infinitely above uncertainty and lies, disguised in high and lofty discourses; because in our minds, even if lying should be their fifth element, this does not prevent that the truth of things is the chief nutriment of superior intellects, though not of wandering wits.^ To lie is so vile, that even if it were in speaking well of godly things it would take off something from God's grace; and Truth is so excellent, that if it praises but small things they become noble.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our life is made by the death of others.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The knowledge of past times and of the places on the earth is both an ornament and nutriment to the human mind.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But you who live in dreams are better pleased by the sophistical reasons and frauds of wits in great and uncertain things, than by those reasons which are certain and natural and not so far above us.
  • Avoid studies of which the result dies with the worker.
  • Men are in error when they lament the flight of time, accusing it of being too swift, and not perceiving that it is sufficient as it passes; but good memory, with which nature has endowed us, causes things long past to seem present.
  • Learning acquired in youth arrests the evil of old age; and if you understand that old age has wisdom for its food, you will so conduct yourself in youth that your old age will not lack for nourishment.
  • The acquisition of any knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good.^ Shun those studies in which the work that results dies with the worker.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The acquisition of any knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But you who live in dreams are better pleased by the sophistical reasons and frauds of wits in great and uncertain things, than by those reasons which are certain and natural and not so far above us.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known.
  • As a day well spent procures a happy sleep, so a life well employed procures a happy death.
  • The water you touch in a river is the last of that which has passed, and the first of that which is coming.^ As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so life well used brings happy death.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The water you touch in a river is the last of that which has passed, and the first of that which is coming.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Thus it is with time present.
  • Just as iron rusts unless it is used, and water putrifies or, in cold, turns to ice, so our intellect spoils unless it is kept in use.^ Just as iron rusts unless it is used, and water putrifies or, in cold, turns to ice, so our intellect spoils unless it is kept in use.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus it is with time present.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Variant : Just as iron rusts from disuse...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Variant: Just as iron rusts from disuse...^ Variant : Just as iron rusts from disuse...
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A: A famous quote is, "Just as iron rusts from disuse, even so does inaction spoil the intellect."
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Visual Artist | Juggle.com 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.juggle.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity, and in cold weather becomes frozen, even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.
      • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

      even so does inaction spoil the intellect.
    • .
  • You do ill if you praise, and still worse if you reprove in a matter you do not understand.
  • It seems to me that men of coarse and clumsy habits and of small knowledge do not deserve such fine instruments nor so great a variety of natural mechanism as men of speculation and of great knowledge; but merely a sack in which their food may be stowed and whence it may issue, since they cannot be judged to be any thing else than vehicles for food; for it seems to me they have nothing about them of the human species but the voice and the figure, and for all the rest are much below beasts.
  • Some there are who are nothing else than a passage for food and augmentors of excrement and fillers of privies, because through them no other things in the world, nor any good effects are produced, since nothing but full privies results from them.
  • The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions.
  • Blind ignorance misleads us thus and delights with the results of lascivious joys.^ They said to him, 'Why do you love her more than all of us?'"
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You may have some moments when you are depressed.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It is bad if you praise, and worse if you reprove a thing, I mean, if you do not understand the matter well.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Because it does not know the true light.^ Because it does not know the true light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because it does not know what is the true light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because there is something Iyer does not know–a line that Kamana wrote which the police have wiped away before he came.
    • Da Vinci Da Gupt Katha | Random Thoughts of a Demented Mind 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC greatbong.net [Source type: General]

    .Because it does not know what is the true light.^ Because it does not know the true light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because it does not know what is the true light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Vain splendour takes from us the power of being ....^ Vain splendour takes from us the power of being ....
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    behold! for its vain splendour we go into the fire, thus blind ignorance does mislead us. .That is, blind ignorance so misleads us that...^ Blind ignorance misleads us thus and delights with the results of lascivious joys.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That is, blind ignorance so misleads us that...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .O! wretched mortals, open your eyes.
  • That is not riches, which may be lost; virtue is our true good and the true reward of its possessor.^ That is not riches, which may be lost; virtue is our true good and the true reward of its possessor.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ O! wretched mortals, open your eyes.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These were done for our most Christian King, or for whomsoever your Lordship may please.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .That cannot be lost; that never deserts us, but when life leaves us.^ That cannot be lost; that never deserts us, but when life leaves us.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No love story comes to us in Leonardo's own life - he never married.
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC everything2.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In Saying 114 of The Gospel of Thomas, Simon Peter is portrayed as saying to Jesus, "Let Mary leave us, for women are not worthy of life."
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    .As to property and external riches, hold them with trembling; they often leave their possessor in contempt, and mocked at for having lost them.
  • Man has much power of discourse which for the most part is vain and false; animals have but little, but it is useful and true, and a small truth is better than a great lie.
  • He who possesses most must be most afraid of loss.
  • He who wishes to be rich in a day will be hanged in a year.
  • That man is of supreme folly who always wants for fear of wanting; and his life flies away while he is still hoping to enjoy the good things which he has with extreme labour acquired.
  • We ought not to desire the impossible.
  • Ask counsel of him who rules himself well.
  • He who does not punish evil commands it to be done.
  • The grave will fall in upon him who digs it.
  • You can have no dominion greater or less than that over yourself.
  • He who thinks little, errs much.
  • It is easier to contend with evil at the first than at the last.
  • Where there is most feeling, there is the greatest martyrdom.
  • The memory of benefits is a frail defence against ingratitude.
  • Reprove your friend in secret and praise him openly.
  • Be not false about the past.
  • Patience serves us against insults precisely as clothes do against the cold.^ Man has much power of discourse which for the most part is vain and false; animals have but little, but it is useful and true, and a small truth is better than a great lie.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They said to him, 'Why do you love her more than all of us?'"
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Decide to feel what you want to feel and you will feel it.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    .For if you multiply your garments as the cold increases, that cold cannot hurt you; in the same way increase your patience under great offences, and they cannot hurt your feelings.
  • To speak well of a base man is much the same as speaking ill of a good man.
  • Envy wounds with false accusations, that is with detraction, a thing which scares virtue.
  • We are deceived by promises and time disappoints us...
  • Fear arises sooner than anything else.
  • Just as courage imperils life, fear protects it.
  • Threats alone are the weapons of the threatened man.
  • Wherever good fortune enters, envy lays siege to the place and attacks it; and when it departs, sorrow and repentance remain behind.
  • He who walks straight rarely falls.
  • It is bad if you praise, and worse if you reprove a thing, I mean, if you do not understand the matter well.
  • It is ill to praise, and worse to reprimand in matters that you do not understand.
  • The lover is moved by the beloved object as the senses are by sensual objects; and they unite and become one and the same thing.^ Threats alone are the weapons of the threatened man.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is bad if you praise, and worse if you reprove a thing, I mean, if you do not understand the matter well.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For if you multiply your garments as the cold increases, that cold cannot hurt you; in the same way increase your patience under great offences, and they cannot hurt your feelings.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The work is the first thing born of this union; if the thing loved is base the lover becomes base.
  • When the thing taken into union is perfectly adapted to that which receives it, the result is delight and pleasure and satisfaction.
  • When that which loves is united to the thing beloved it can rest there; when the burden is laid down it finds rest there.^ When that which loves is united to the thing beloved it can rest there; when the burden is laid down it finds rest there.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The work is the first thing born of this union; if the thing loved is base the lover becomes base.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When the thing taken into union is perfectly adapted to that which receives it, the result is delight and pleasure and satisfaction.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .There will be eternal fame also for the inhabitants of that town, constructed and enlarged by him.
  • The city will gain beauty worthy of its name and to you it will be useful by its revenues, and the eternal fame of its aggrandizement.
    • These notes were possibly written in preparation for a letter.^ The city will gain beauty worthy of its name and to you it will be useful by its revenues, and the eternal fame of its aggrandizement.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ These notes were possibly written in preparation for a letter.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ There will be eternal fame also for the inhabitants of that town, constructed and enlarged by him.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .The meaning is obscure.
  • To preserve Nature's chiefest boon, that is freedom, I can find means of offence and defence, when it is assailed by ambitious tyrants, and first I will speak of the situation of the walls, and also I shall show how communities can maintain their good and just Lords.
  • The false interpreters of nature declare that quicksilver is the common seed of every metal, not remembering that nature varies the seed according to the variety of the things she desires to produce in the world.
  • Many have made a trade of delusions and false miracles, deceiving the stupid multitude.^ To preserve Nature's chiefest boon, that is freedom, I can find means of offence and defence, when it is assailed by ambitious tyrants, and first I will speak of the situation of the walls, and also I shall show how communities can maintain their good and just Lords.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many have made a trade of delusions and false miracles, deceiving the stupid multitude.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The false interpreters of nature declare that quicksilver is the common seed of every metal, not remembering that nature varies the seed according to the variety of the things she desires to produce in the world.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Pharisees— that is to say, friars.
  • It is true that impatience, the mother of stupidity, praises brevity, as if such persons had not life long enough to serve them to acquire a complete knowledge of one single subject, such as the human body; and then they want to comprehend the mind of God in which the universe is included, weighing it minutely and mincing it into infinite parts, as if they had to dissect it!
  • Oh!^ It is true that impatience, the mother of stupidity, praises brevity, as if such persons had not life long enough to serve them to acquire a complete knowledge of one single subject, such as the human body; and then they want to comprehend the mind of God in which the universe is included, weighing it minutely and mincing it into infinite parts, as if they had to dissect it!
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In fact, debate has spilled over into the personal realm of his life-over his sexuality, religious beliefs, and even possible vegetarianism, for example-which only confirms and reflects what has long been obvious: whether the subject is his life, his ideas, or his artistic legacy, Leonardo's influence shows little sign of abating.
    • Aspect Art | Da Vinci Biography 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.aspectart.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ First Part of the Book on Painting , 1651, “The Paragone” Encarta citation Oysters open completely when the moon is full; and when the crab sees one it throws a piece of stone or seaweed into it and the oyster cannot close again so that it serves the crab for meat.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    human stupidity, do you not perceive that, though you have been with yourself all your life, you are not yet aware of the thing you possess most of, that is of your folly? and then, with the crowd of sophists, you deceive yourselves and others, despising the mathematical sciences, in which truth dwells and the knowledge of the things included in them. .And then you occupy yourself with miracles, and write that you possess information of those things of which the human mind is incapable and which cannot be proved by any instance from nature.^ And then you occupy yourself with miracles, and write that you possess information of those things of which the human mind is incapable and which cannot be proved by any instance from nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Just write down all the questions that come to mind, all the things that you would love to know the answers to.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Again and again in his writings, Leonardo attributes the beginning and end of all things to nature: "Human ingenuity...
    • HHF Factpaper: Leonardo da Vinci: Artist, Humanist, Scientist, Jew[?] 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.hebrewhistory.info [Source type: Original source]

    .And you fancy you have wrought miracles when you spoil a work of some speculative mind, and do not perceive that you are falling into the same error as that of a man who strips a tree of the ornament of its branches covered with leaves mingled with the scented blossoms or fruit
  • The spirit has no voice, because where there is a voice there is a body, and where there is a body space is occupied, and this prevents the eye from seeing what is placed behind that space; hence the surrounding air is filled by the body, that is by its image.
  • In order to prove whether the spirit can speak or not, it is necessary in the first place to define what a voice is and how it is generated.
  • Every quantity is intellectually conceivable as infinitely divisible.
  • Amid the vastness of the things among which we live, the existence of nothingness holds the first place; its function extends over all things that have no existence, and its essence, as regards time, lies precisely between the past and the future, and has nothing in the present.^ The proposition is proved to be true, because the boundary of a thing is a surface, which is not part of the body contained within that surface; nor is it part of the air surrounding that body, but is the medium interposted between the air and the body, as is proved in its place.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Amid the vastness of the things among which we live, the existence of nothingness holds the first place; its function extends over all things that have no existence, and its essence, as regards time, lies precisely between the past and the future, and has nothing in the present.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye— which sees all objects reversed— retains the images for some time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This nothingness has the part equal to the whole, and the whole to the part, the divisible to the indivisible; and the product of the sum is the same whether we divide or multiply, and in addition as in subtraction; as is proved by arithmeticians by their tenth figure which represents zero; and its power has not extension among the things of Nature.
  • What is called Nothingness is to be found only in time and in speech.^ This nothingness has the part equal to the whole, and the whole to the part, the divisible to the indivisible; and the product of the sum is the same whether we divide or multiply, and in addition as in subtraction; as is proved by arithmeticians by their tenth figure which represents zero; and its power has not extension among the things of Nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What is called Nothingness is to be found only in time and in speech.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In his landscape segment in the same picture, Leonardo also found a new expression for "nature experienced," in reproducing the forms he perceived as if through a veil of mist.
    • History of Art: Renaissance -  Leonardo da Vinci 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .In time it stands between the past and future and has no existence in the present; and thus in speech it is one of the things of which we say: They are not, or they are impossible.
  • O mighty and once living instrument of formative nature.^ O mighty and once living instrument of formative nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In time it stands between the past and future and has no existence in the present; and thus in speech it is one of the things of which we say: They are not, or they are impossible.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus it is with time present.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Incapable of availing thyself of thy vast strength thou hast to abandon a life of stillness and to obey the law which God and time gave to procreative nature.^ Incapable of availing thyself of thy vast strength thou hast to abandon a life of stillness and to obey the law which God and time gave to procreative nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip?
    • The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC biblebelievers.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ O stupendous Necessity— by thy laws thou dost compel every effect to be the direct result of its cause, by the shortest path.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Of the lightning in clouds.
  • O time, swift robber of all created things, how many kings, how many nations hast thou undone, and how many changes of states and of various events have happened since the wondrous forms of this fish perished here in this cavernous and winding recess.^ O time, swift robber of all created things, how many kings, how many nations hast thou undone, and how many changes of states and of various events have happened since the wondrous forms of this fish perished here in this cavernous and winding recess.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tell me how the things happened.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Incapable of availing thyself of thy vast strength thou hast to abandon a life of stillness and to obey the law which God and time gave to procreative nature.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Now destroyed by time thou liest patiently in this confined space with bones stripped and bare; serving as a support and prop for the superimposed mountain.

XX

.
  • 'The Caladrius is a bird of which it is related that, when it is carried into the presence of a sick person, if the sick man is going to die, the bird turns away its head and never looks at him; but if the sick man is to be saved the bird never loses sight of him but is the cause of curing him of all his sickness.^ The Caladrius is a bird of which it is related that, when it is carried into the presence of a sick person, if the sick man is going to die, the bird turns away its head and never looks at him; but if the sick man is to be saved the bird never loses sight of him but is the cause of curing him of all his sickness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Giorgio Vasari, the first ever Art Historian, related that Leonardo "caused continuous doubts for the master who taught him and often confounded him."
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ They told us that they were NOT going to pursue charges against the man, and that we should get our child into psychiatric counseling.
    • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

    .Like unto this is the love of virtue.^ Like unto this is the love of virtue.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It never looks at any vile or base thing, but rather clings always to pure and virtuous things and takes up its abode in a noble heart; as the birds do in green woods on flowery branches.^ It never looks at any vile or base thing, but rather clings always to pure and virtuous things and takes up its abode in a noble heart; as the birds do in green woods on flowery branches.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of dreams There will be many who will eagerly and with great care and solicitude follow up a thing, which, if they only knew its malignity, would always terrify them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To lie is so vile, that even if it were in speaking well of godly things it would take off something from God's grace; and Truth is so excellent, that if it praises but small things they become noble.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And this Love shows itself more in adversity than in prosperity; as light does, which shines most where the place is darkest.
  • The unicorn, through its intemperance and not knowing how to control itself, for the love it bears to fair maidens forgets its ferocity and wildness; and laying aside all fear it will go up to a seated damsel and go to sleep in her lap, and thus the hunters take it.
  • We see the most striking example of humility in the lamb which will submit to any animal; and when they are given for food to imprisoned lions they are as gentle to them as to their own mother, so that very often it has been seen that the lions forbear to kill them.
  • The cock does not crow till it has thrice flapped its wings; the parrot in moving among boughs never puts its feet excepting where it has first put its beak.^ They said to him, 'Why do you love her more than all of us?'"
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The unicorn, through its intemperance and not knowing how to control itself, for the love it bears to fair maidens forgets its ferocity and wildness; and laying aside all fear it will go up to a seated damsel and go to sleep in her lap, and thus the hunters take it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because it does not know the true light.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Vows are not made till Hope is dead.
  • A man was desired to rise from bed, because the sun was already risen.^ A man was desired to rise from bed, because the sun was already risen.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Vows are not made till Hope is dead.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because Constantine upgraded Jesus status almost four centuries after Jesus death, thousands of documents already existed chronicling His life as a mortal man .
    • The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC biblebelievers.com [Source type: Original source]

    .To which he replied: "If I had as far to go, and as much to do as he has, I should be risen by now; but having but a little way to go, I shall not rise yet."
  • First, of things relating to animals; secondly, of irrational creatures; thirdly of plants; fourthly, of ceremonies; fifthly, of manners; sixthly, of cases or edicts or quarrels; seventhly, of cases that are impossible in nature [paradoxes], as, for instance, of those things which, the more is taken from them, the more they grow.^ To which he replied: "If I had as far to go, and as much to do as he has, I should be risen by now; but having but a little way to go, I shall not rise yet."
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ First, of things relating to animals; secondly, of irrational creatures; thirdly of plants; fourthly, of ceremonies; fifthly, of manners; sixthly, of cases or edicts or quarrels; seventhly, of cases that are impossible in nature [paradoxes], as, for instance, of those things which, the more is taken from them, the more they grow.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of those men, who, the older they grow, the more avaricious they become, whereas, having but little time to stay, they should become more liberal.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And reserve the great matters till the end, and the small matters give at the beginning.
  • Men will seem to see new destructions in the sky.^ Men will seem to see new destructions in the sky.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Reserve the great matters till the end, and the small matters give at the beginning.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And reserve the great matters till the end, and the small matters give at the beginning.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The flames that fall from it will seem to rise in it and to fly from it with terror.^ The flames that fall from it will seem to rise in it and to fly from it with terror.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They will hear every kind of animals speak in human language.^ You will speak with animals of every species and they with you in human speech.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They will hear every kind of animals speak in human language.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The reason she is going under cover is to expose the fact that many of the folks at Planned Parenthood will attempt to ignore and cover up this kind of abuse when they hear about it.
    • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

    .They will instantaneously run in person in various parts of the world, without motion.^ They will instantaneously run in person in various parts of the world, without motion.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Are we to believe these various translations were identically altered all over the world so they would have a uniform revision?
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They will see the greatest splendour in the midst of darkness.^ They will see the greatest splendour in the midst of darkness.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .O! marvel of the human race!^ O! marvel of the human race!
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .What madness has led you thus!^ What madness has led you thus!
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .You will speak with animals of every species and they with you in human speech.^ You will speak with animals of every species and they with you in human speech.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They will hear every kind of animals speak in human language.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .You will see yourself fall from great heights without any harm and torrents will accompany you, and will mingle with their rapid course.^ You will see yourself fall from great heights without any harm and torrents will accompany you, and will mingle with their rapid course.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Give yourself the "contrast" of thinking how blessed you are in being able to see.
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Last night I went to see "The Da Vinci Code" and contrary to what you may have read, "The Da Vinci Code" is a great mystery novel/movie and is definitely one of a kind.
    • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • Of dreams
  • There will be many who will eagerly and with great care and solicitude follow up a thing, which, if they only knew its malignity, would always terrify them.^ Of dreams There will be many who will eagerly and with great care and solicitude follow up a thing, which, if they only knew its malignity, would always terrify them.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many will there be who will give up work and labour and poverty of life and goods, and will go to live among wealth in splendid buildings, declaring that this is the way to make themselves acceptable to God.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I was a student at the time who, when taking photographs, was always careful to find out what the rules were and, if there was a steward in the room I would always double check that I was able to take a photo 'sans flash' - simple french but it seemed to work!!
    • Jonathan Jones: Tourist snappers are killing the Mona Lisa | Art and design | guardian.co.uk 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    .Of those men, who, the older they grow, the more avaricious they become, whereas, having but little time to stay, they should become more liberal.
  • Many will be busied in taking away from a thing, which will grow in proportion as it is diminished.^ Many will be busied in taking away from a thing, which will grow in proportion as it is diminished.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of those men, who, the older they grow, the more avaricious they become, whereas, having but little time to stay, they should become more liberal.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is here that much precious time is wasted, that is, in the morning, when the mind is composed and rested, and the body is made fit to begin new labours; there again many vain pleasures are enjoyed; both by the mind in imagining impossible things, and by the body in taking those pleasures that are often the cause of the failing of life.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Of a ditch
  • Oh! how foul a thing, that we should see the tongue of one animal in the guts of another. .
    • Of the Tongues of Pigs and Calves in Sausage-skins.
  • There will be great winds by reason of which things of the East will become things of the West; and those of the South, being involved in the course of the winds, will follow them to distant lands.
  • There will be many men who will move one against another, holding in their hands a cutting tool.^ There will be great winds by reason of which things of the East will become things of the West; and those of the South, being involved in the course of the winds, will follow them to distant lands.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who were there punished me.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ There will be many men who will move one against another, holding in their hands a cutting tool.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But these will not do each other any injury beyond tiring each other; for, when one pushes forward the other will draw back.^ But these will not do each other any injury beyond tiring each other; for, when one pushes forward the other will draw back.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ [Footnote: Two slightly sketched maps, one of Europe the other of Spain, are at the side of these notes.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Another draws back behind the one who leans forward, and sees the speaker between the wall and the man who is leaning [Footnote: 6.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But woe to him who comes between them!^ But woe to him who comes between them!
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For he will end by being cut in pieces.
  • That which was at first bound, cast out and rent by many and various beaters will be respected and honoured, and its precepts will be listened to with reverence and love.
  • One who by himself is mild enough and void of all offence will become terrible and fierce by being in bad company, and will most cruelly take the life of many men, and would kill many more if they were not hindered by bodies having no soul, that have come out of caverns— that is, breastplates of iron.
  • One shall be born from small beginnings which will rapidly become vast.^ And their bodies will become the sepulture and means of transit of all they have killed.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One shall be born from small beginnings which will rapidly become vast.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One who by himself is mild enough and void of all offence will become terrible and fierce by being in bad company, and will most cruelly take the life of many men, and would kill many more if they were not hindered by bodies having no soul, that have come out of caverns— that is, breastplates of iron.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This will respect no created thing, rather will it, by its power, transform almost every thing from its own nature into another.
    • "Of fire"
  • All the elements will be seen mixed together in a great whirling mass, now borne towards the centre of the world, now towards the sky; and now furiously rushing from the South towards the frozen North, and sometimes from the East towards the West, and then again from this hemisphere to the other.^ This will respect no created thing, rather will it, by its power, transform almost every thing from its own nature into another.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Of fire" All the elements will be seen mixed together in a great whirling mass, now borne towards the centre of the world, now towards the sky; and now furiously rushing from the South towards the frozen North, and sometimes from the East towards the West, and then again from this hemisphere to the other.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The Ball of Snow rolling over Snow" The East will be seen to rush to the West and the South to the North in confusion round and about the universe, with great noise and trembling or fury.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Of Water, which flows turbid and mixed with Soil and Dust; and of Mist, which is mixed with the Air; and of Fire which is mixed with its own, and each with each."
  • Men standing in opposite hemispheres will converse and deride each other and embrace each other, and understand each other's language.^ "Of Water, which flows turbid and mixed with Soil and Dust; and of Mist, which is mixed with the Air; and of Fire which is mixed with its own, and each with each."
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Men standing in opposite hemispheres will converse and deride each other and embrace each other, and understand each other's language.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Of fire" All the elements will be seen mixed together in a great whirling mass, now borne towards the centre of the world, now towards the sky; and now furiously rushing from the South towards the frozen North, and sometimes from the East towards the West, and then again from this hemisphere to the other.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Of Hemispheres, which are infinite; and which are divided by an infinite number of Lines, so that every Man always has one of these Lines between his Feet."
  • Many will there be who will give up work and labour and poverty of life and goods, and will go to live among wealth in splendid buildings, declaring that this is the way to make themselves acceptable to God.
  • An infinite number of men will sell publicly and unhindered things of the very highest price, without leave from the Master of it; while it never was theirs nor in their power; and human justice will not prevent it.^ "Of Hemispheres, which are infinite; and which are divided by an infinite number of Lines, so that every Man always has one of these Lines between his Feet."
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ An infinite number of men will sell publicly and unhindered things of the very highest price, without leave from the Master of it; while it never was theirs nor in their power; and human justice will not prevent it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many will there be who will give up work and labour and poverty of life and goods, and will go to live among wealth in splendid buildings, declaring that this is the way to make themselves acceptable to God.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Of Selling Paradise"
  • Animals will be seen on the earth who will always be fighting against each other with the greatest loss and frequent deaths on each side.^ "Of Selling Paradise" Animals will be seen on the earth who will always be fighting against each other with the greatest loss and frequent deaths on each side.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ L. Other drawings of heads, all characterised by the expression of vehement excitement that is appropriate to men fighting, are to be seen at Windsor (No.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci/X - Wikisource 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And there will be no end to their malignity; by their strong limbs we shall see a great portion of the trees of the vast forests laid low throughout the universe; and, when they are filled with food the satisfaction of their desires will be to deal death and grief and labour and wars and fury to every living thing; and from their immoderate pride they will desire to rise towards heaven, but the too great weight of their limbs will keep them down.^ And there will be no end to their malignity; by their strong limbs we shall see a great portion of the trees of the vast forests laid low throughout the universe; and, when they are filled with food the satisfaction of their desires will be to deal death and grief and labour and wars and fury to every living thing; and from their immoderate pride they will desire to rise towards heaven, but the too great weight of their limbs will keep them down.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have seen motions of the air so furious that they have carried, mixed up in their course, the largest trees of the forest and whole roofs of great palaces, and I have seen the same fury bore a hole with a whirling movement digging out a gravel pit, and carrying gravel, sand and water more than half a mile through the air.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Like a whirling wind which rushes down a sandy and hollow valley, and which, in its hasty course, drives to its centre every thing that opposes its furious course...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Nothing will remain on earth, or under the earth or in the waters which will not be persecuted, disturbed and spoiled, and those of one country removed into another.^ Nothing will remain on earth, or under the earth or in the waters which will not be persecuted, disturbed and spoiled, and those of one country removed into another.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In one course I had the privilege of studying, not the actual scrolls, which were locked safely away, but photographs of those scrolls which had not yet been published or translated into English.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Behind the woman's head there is a water basin with a river floating under it and the depiction of two paths, one to the left and the other to the right.
    • HHF Factpaper: Leonardo da Vinci: Artist, Humanist, Scientist, Jew[?] 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC www.hebrewhistory.info [Source type: Original source]

    .And their bodies will become the sepulture and means of transit of all they have killed.^ And their bodies will become the sepulture and means of transit of all they have killed.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I mean ALL liberals are secretly wanting abortion clinics on every corner This way they can hide all the evidence of their molesting little underage girls..
    • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

    ^ And by means of these, images of the body are transmitted everywhere and on all sides, and each receives in itself every minutest portion of the object that produces it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    O Earth! why dost thou not open and engulf them in the fissures of thy vast abyss and caverns, and no longer display in the sight of heaven such a cruel and horrible monster. .
    • "Of the Cruelty of Man"
  • There will be many which will increase in their destruction.^ "Of the Cruelty of Man" There will be many which will increase in their destruction.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "The Ball of Snow rolling over Snow"
  • The East will be seen to rush to the West and the South to the North in confusion round and about the universe, with great noise and trembling or fury.^ "The Ball of Snow rolling over Snow" The East will be seen to rush to the West and the South to the North in confusion round and about the universe, with great noise and trembling or fury.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Of fire" All the elements will be seen mixed together in a great whirling mass, now borne towards the centre of the world, now towards the sky; and now furiously rushing from the South towards the frozen North, and sometimes from the East towards the West, and then again from this hemisphere to the other.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Bertinoro is seen from Imola two points from the East towards the South East at a distance of 27 miles.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 5/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "In the East wind which rushes to the West"
  • The solar rays will kindle fire on the earth, by which a thing that is under the sky will be set on fire, and, being reflected by some obstacle, it will bend downwards.
  • Happy will they be who lend ear to the words of the Dead.
  • Men out of fear will cling to the thing they most fear.
  • Things that are separate shall be united and acquire such virtue that they will restore to man his lost memory
    • Of papyrus
  • The bones of the Dead will be seen to govern the fortunes of him who moves them.^ The film exonerates the Vatican of any part in the conspiracy plot, showing the conspirators’ fears that they’d be excommunicated if their dirty deeds were ever found out.
    • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The recipients of the book of Revelation were undergoing such severe persecution that some of them were being killed (see Revelation 2:13).
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ AND I STILL ENJOYED THE BOOK. All those embarrassing, close-minded Christians who feel the need to flip out over a text and film that they've undoubtedly never seen or read are absolutely moronic.
    • Da Vinci Code, The | Pajiba - Scathing Reviews for Bitchy People 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.pajiba.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ** Of Dice
  • The vine that has grown old on an old tree falls with the ruin of that tree, and through that bad companionship must perish with it.
  • The ball of snow when, as it rolls, it descends from the snowy mountains, increases in size as it falls.
  • A vase of unbaked clay, when broken, may be remoulded, but not a baked one.
  • The image of the sun where it falls appears as a thing which covers the person who attempts to cover it.

XXI

.
  • I have seen motions of the air so furious that they have carried, mixed up in their course, the largest trees of the forest and whole roofs of great palaces, and I have seen the same fury bore a hole with a whirling movement digging out a gravel pit, and carrying gravel, sand and water more than half a mile through the air.
  • Like a whirling wind which rushes down a sandy and hollow valley, and which, in its hasty course, drives to its centre every thing that opposes its furious course...^ I have seen motions of the air so furious that they have carried, mixed up in their course, the largest trees of the forest and whole roofs of great palaces, and I have seen the same fury bore a hole with a whirling movement digging out a gravel pit, and carrying gravel, sand and water more than half a mile through the air.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ OF THE MOVEMENT OF AIR ENCLOSED IN WATER. I have seen motions of the air so furious that they have carried, mixed up in their course, the largest trees of the forest and whole roofs of great palaces, and I have seen the same fury bore a hole with a whirling movement digging out a gravel pit, and carrying gravel, sand and water more than half a mile through the air.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Like a whirling wind which rushes down a sandy and hollow valley, and which, in its hasty course, drives to its centre every thing that opposes its furious course...
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .No otherwise does the Northern blast whirl round in its tempestuous progress ...
  • It vexes me greatly that having to earn my living has forced me to interrupt the work and to attend to small matters
  • If you meet with any one who is virtuous do not drive him from you; do him honour, so that he may not have to flee from you and be reduced to hiding in hermitages, or caves or other solitary places to escape from your treachery; if there is such an one among you do him honour, for these are our Saints upon earth; these are they who deserve statues from us, and images...
  • May it please our great Author that I may demonstrate the nature of man and his customs, in the way I describe his figure.
  • This writing distinctly about the kite seems to be my destiny, because among the first recollections of my infancy, it seemed to me that, as I was in my cradle, a kite came to me and opened my mouth with its tail, and struck me several times with its tail inside my lips.
  • When I did well, as a boy you used to put me in prison.^ In my opinion, these are great questions.
    • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Did you sit because you were tired?
    • The Geniuses' Genius: Leonardo da Vinci and his brain power techniques 28 January 2010 0:16 UTC www.wilywalnut.com [Source type: General]

    ^ If you meet with any one who is virtuous do not drive him from you; do him honour, so that he may not have to flee from you and be reduced to hiding in hermitages, or caves or other solitary places to escape from your treachery; if there is such an one among you do him honour, for these are our Saints upon earth; these are they who deserve statues from us, and images; but remember that their images are not to be eaten by you, as is still done in some parts of India [Footnote 15: In explanation of this passage I have received the following communication from Dr. G. W. LEITNER of Lahore: "So far as Indian customs are known to us, this practice spoken of by Leonardo as 'still existing in some parts of India' is perfectly unknown; and it is equally opposed to the spirit of Hinduism, Mohammedanism and Sikhism.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Now if I do it being grown up, you will do worse to me.
  • Tell me if anything was ever done.
    • This was written in his notebooks in despair of so many projects that were never completed.
  • Do not reveal, if liberty is precious to you; my face is the prison of love.
  • I ask at what part of its curved motion the moving cause will leave the thing moved and moveable.
  • If any man could have discovered the utmost powers of the cannon, in all its various forms and have given such a secret to the Romans, with what rapidity would they have conquered every country and have vanquished every army, and what reward could have been great enough for such a service!^ Now if I do it being grown up, you will do worse to me.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Florence would conquer all its enemies.
    • Did Leonardo Da Vinci Fly? 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC sped2work.tripod.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Do not reveal, if liberty is precious to you; my face is the prison of love.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    Archimedes indeed, although he had greatly damaged the Romans in the siege of Syracuse, nevertheless did not fail of being offered great rewards from these very Romans; and when Syracuse was taken, diligent search was made for Archimedes; and he being found dead greater lamentation was made for him by the Senate and people of Rome than if they had lost all their army; and they did not fail to honour him with burial and with a statue.
  • Reserve the great matters till the end, and the small matters give at the beginning.

Other

.
  • Painting is poetry which is seen and not heard, and poetry is a painting which is heard but not seen.^ Painting is poetry which is seen and not heard, and poetry is a painting which is heard but not seen.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Oysters open completely when the moon is full; and when the crab sees one it throws a piece of stone or seaweed into it and the oyster cannot close again so that it serves the crab for meat.^ First Part of the Book on Painting , 1651, “The Paragone” Encarta citation Oysters open completely when the moon is full; and when the crab sees one it throws a piece of stone or seaweed into it and the oyster cannot close again so that it serves the crab for meat.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thomas said to them, "If I tell you one of the things which he told me, you will pick up stones and throw them at me; a fire will come out of the stones and burn you up."
    • Crash Goes The Da Vinci Code 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC leaderu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why this comet appears of variable forms, so that it is now round and now long, and now again divided into two or three parts, and now in one piece, and when it is to be seen again.
    • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 2 by Leonardo Da Vinci - Full Text Free Book (Part 8/10) 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Such is the fate of him who opens his mouth too much and thereby puts himself at the mercy of the listener.^ Such is the fate of him who opens his mouth too much and thereby puts himself at the mercy of the listener.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It also seems helpful to try to develop some sense of solidarity with those who suffer, such as the poor and sick, and particularly Christ himself.
    • They Whip Themselves, Don‚Äôt They? — || The Da Vinci Code & Opus Dei || Archive 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC davincicode-opusdei.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Lillian Schwartz of Bell Labs, who has gained much support, offers the theory that the portrait is a female version of Da Vinci himself.
    • Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • Greene, Robert (2000).^ Greene, Robert (2000).
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .The 48 Laws of Power.^ The 48 Laws of Power .
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Concise 48 Laws of Power .
      • Profile Books :: The Da Vinci Notebooks :: Leonardo da Vinci 11 January 2010 17:44 UTC www.profilebooks.com [Source type: General]

      Penguin Books. pp. 33. ISBN 0140280197.
       

Misattributed

.
  • I have from an early age abjured the use of meat, and the time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men.^ I have from an early age abjured the use of meat, and the time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of those men, who, the older they grow, the more avaricious they become, whereas, having but little time to stay, they should become more liberal.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She lives with that guilt every day because she has now come to realize that they weren’t tumors or parasites but children that were being killed out of convenience.
    • Hot Air » Blog Archive » Video: New Mona Lisa Project undercover video in Alabama 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC hotair.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • From a novel by Dimitri Merejkowski entitled "The Romance of Leonardo da Vinci", which put this quote into Da Vinci's mouth, among other (accurate) quotes.^ Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote .
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ From a novel by Dimitri Merejkowski entitled "The Romance of Leonardo da Vinci", which put this quote into Da Vinci's mouth, among other (accurate) quotes.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Art · Leonardo da Vinci Culture .
      • Jonathan Jones: Tourist snappers are killing the Mona Lisa | Art and design | guardian.co.uk 28 January 2010 0:30 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

      .It got into popular academic literature via the anthology "The Extended Circle: A Commonplace book of Animal Rights" (1985), by Jon Wynne-Tyson.^ It got into popular academic literature via the anthology "The Extended Circle: A Commonplace book of Animal Rights" (1985), by Jon Wynne-Tyson.
      • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Although a popular more than a scholarly book, my research for this book caught me up on the academic study of Jesus and the gospels, including the Gnostic gospels.
      • The Da Vinci Opportunity: How the Da Vinci Code Can Be Helpful 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC www.markdroberts.com [Source type: General]

      Thanks to 1. .However, despite the quote's false attribution, da Vinci was in fact a vegetarian.
  • Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff.^ However, despite the quote's false attribution, da Vinci was in fact a vegetarian.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ From a novel by Dimitri Merejkowski entitled "The Romance of Leonardo da Vinci", which put this quote into Da Vinci's mouth, among other (accurate) quotes.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Most fails. Some works. .You do more of what works.^ You do more of what works.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If it works big, others quickly copy it.^ If it works big, others quickly copy it.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 1 February 2010 2:53 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Then you do something else. .The trick is the doing something else.^ The trick is the doing something else.
    • Leonardo da Vinci - Wikiquote 9 February 2010 13:27 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    [1] (Note: Quote is actually of Tom Peters)

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Simple English

File:Leonardo
Leonardo da Vinci, possibly a self-portrait, in the Royal Library of Turin

Leonardo Da Vinci (15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519) was an Italian Renaissance genius, who was good at many things, but most famous as a painter.[1] He was also a scientist, a mathematician, an engineer, an inventor, an anatomist, a sculptor, an architect, a botanist, a musician and writer. Leonardo was curious about everything in nature. He wanted to know how everything worked. He was very good at studying, designing and making all sorts of interesting things.[2]

Many people think that Leonardo was one of the greatest painters of all time. Many people think that he was the most talented person ever to have lived.[1] The art historian Helen Gardner said that no-one has ever been quite like him because he was interested in so many things that he seems to have had the mind of a giant, and yet what he was like as a person is still a mystery.[3]

Leonardo was born at Vinci which is a small town near Florence in Italy. He was trained to be an artist by the sculptor and painter Verrocchio. He spent most of his life working for rich Italian noblemen. In his last years he lived in a beautiful home given to him by the King of France.

Leonardo could do all sorts of clever things, but he was most famous as a painter. Two of his pictures are among the best-known paintings in the world: the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper. He did many drawings. The best-known drawing is the Vitruvian Man. It is so well known that even Homer Simpson and Garfield have been drawn in a square and a circle to look like the drawing. Leonardo was always thinking of new inventions. Most of his inventions were never made. However, we know his ideas, because he kept notebooks and wrote and drew in them very often. Some of the ideas that he thought of were a helicopter, a tank, a calculator, a robot and solar power.

Contents

Life

Childhood, 1452 –1466

File:Study of a Tuscan
Leonardo's earliest known drawing, the Arno Valley, 1473. It can be found in the Uffizi Gallery.

Leonardo was born on 15 April 1452, in the Tuscan hill town of Vinci, in the valley of the Arno River. His grandfather, Ser Antonio, wrote down the details of the birth. Leonardo's parents were not married. His father was a lawyer, Messer Piero Fruosino di Antonio da Vinci.[4][5] His mother, Caterina, was a servant. She may have been a slave from the Middle East.[6][7] Leonardo's full name was "Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci", which means "Leonardo, the son of Messer (Mister) Piero from Vinci".

Leonardo spent his first five years living in a farm house with his mother. Then he lived at Vinci with his father, his father's wife Albiera, his grandparents and uncle, Francesco.[8] When Leonardo grew up, he only wrote down two things about his childhood. He remembered that when he was lying outside in his cradle a large bird flew from the sky and hovered over him. Its tail feathers brushed his face.[8] Leonardo's other important memory was how he found a cave while exploring in the mountains. He was terrified that some great monster might be hiding there. But he was also very excited and curious to find out what was inside.[8]

Leonardo started painting while he was still a boy. Giorgio Vasari wrote about Leonardo's life shortly after his death. He tells many interesting stories about how clever Leonardo was. He says that Leonardo painted a round wooden shield with a picture of snakes spitting fire. Messer Piero took his son's painting to Florence and sold it to an art dealer.[9]

File:Andrea del Verrocchio
The Baptism of Christ (1472–1475)—Uffizi, by Verrocchio and Leonardo

Verrocchio's workshop, 1466 –1476

In 1467, when Leonardo was fourteen, his father took him to Florence, to be an apprentice to the artist Verrocchio.

Florence was a very exciting place for a young person who wanted to be an artist. Many famous artists had lived in Florence, starting with Cimabue and Giotto in the 1200s. Everywhere a person looked there were famous and beautiful artworks. The huge cathedral had an enormous new dome. The church of St John had doors that gleamed with gold and were said to be the most beautiful doors in the world. Another church had statues all around it by the most famous sculptors, including one by Leonardo's teacher Verrocchio.

If an artist was lucky, they would find a rich patron who would buy lots of their paintings. The richest family in Florence were the Medici. They had built themselves the finest palace in Florence, and liked buying paintings, statues and other beautiful things. They were also interested in the study of literature and philosophy. Many young artists hope to get work from the Medici and their friends.

Verrocchio had a big workshop that was one of the busiest in Florence. Leonardo was learning to be an artist, so he had to learn drawing, painting, sculpting and model making. While he was at the workshop, he was able to learn all sorts of other useful skills: chemistry, metallurgy, metal working, plaster casting, leather working, mechanics and carpentry.[10][11][12]

Leonardo was not the only young painter at Verrocchio's workshop. Many other painters were trained there, or often visited. Some of them later became famous: Ghirlandaio, Perugino and Botticelli. These artists were all just a few years older than Leonardo.[8][13]

Vasari tells an interesting story from this time of Leonardo's life. Verrocchio was painting a large picture of the Baptism of Christ. He gave Leonardo the job of painting one of the angels holding Jesus' robe on the left side of the picture. Vasari said that Leonardo painted the angel so beautifully that Verrocchio put down his brush and never painted again.[9] When the painting is examined closely it is possible to see that many other parts of the picture, such as the rocks, the brown stream and the background may have been painted by Leonardo as well.[5] Verrocchio made a bronze statue of David at this time. It is believed that he used Leonardo as his model. [5]

In about 1472, when he was twenty, Leonardo joined the Guild of St Luke, an organisation of artists and doctors of medicine. Even after his father set him up in his own workshop, Leonardo still enjoyed working at Verrocchio's workshop.[8] Leonardo's earliest known work is a drawing in pen and ink of the Arno River valley. It has the date 5 August 1473. It is now in the Uffizi Gallery.[13]

Working life 1476 –1499

File:Leonardo da Vinci Adoration of the
The Adoration of the Magi, (1481)—Uffizi.

When Vasari writes about Leonardo, he uses words like "noble", "generous", "graceful" and "beautiful". Vasari tells us that as an adult Leonardo was a tall handsome man. He was so strong that he could bend horseshoes with his bare hands. His voice was so beautiful that it charmed everyone that heard it. Almost everyone wanted to be his friend. He loved animals, was a vegetarian and would buy birds at the market and set them free.[14]

Very little is known about Leonardo's life and work between 1472 and 1481. He was probably busy in Florence.[5] In 1478, he had an important commission to paint an altarpiece for the Monks of San Donato a Scopeto. The painting was to be the Adoration of the Magi (The Three Wise Men). The painting was never finished because Leonardo was sent away to Milan.

Leonardo was a very talented musician.[15] In 1482, he made a silver lyre (a musical instrument) in the shape of a horse's head. At that time there was a new ruler in the city of Milan, in the north of Italy. Duke Ludovico il Moro was making other rulers nervous. Lorenzo Medici sent Leonardo to Milan as an ambassador. Lorenzo de' Medici wanted Leonardo to give Ludovico the lyre as a present from him.[16] Leonardo wrote a letter to the Duke of Milan, telling him about all the clever and useful things that he could do, like making war machines. He wrote in the letter that he could "also paint". Leonardo did not know at the time that it was for painting that he would be mostly remembered.[13][17] Leonardo stayed in Milan and worked for the Duke between 1482 and 1499. Part of his work was to design festivals and carnival processions. In Leonardo's note books are drawings of theatre costumes, amazing helmets and scenes that might be for the theatre.

File:Virgin of the
Virgin of the Rocks, Louvre, possibly 1505–1508.

Leonardo, like most other well-known artists of his time, had servants, young students and older assistants in his workshop. One of his young students was a boy whose name was Gian Giacomo Caprotti da Oreno. He was a handsome boy with beautiful long golden curls. He looked perfect as a artist's model for an angel. But he was such a difficult and dishonest boy that Leonardo called him "Salai" or "Salaino" which means "the little devil". Leonardo wrote in his notebook that Salai was very greedy, that he was a liar and that he had stolen things from the house at least five times.[18] Salai stayed in Leonardo's household for thirty years as a pupil and a servant.

Gran Cavallo

Leonardo's most important work for Duke Ludovico was to make a huge statue of the previous ruler, Francesco Sforza, on horseback. He started with the horse. After studying horses and drawing designs, he made a huge horse of clay. It was called the "Gran Cavallo". It was going to be cast in bronze. It was going to be the biggest bronze horse that had been made for more than a thousand years. Unfortunately, the bronze horse was never made. In 1494, Ludovico gave the bronze to be made into cannons because the French army was invading Milan.[13] The huge clay horse was still standing when the French army invaded again in 1499. This time it was used for target practice and was completely destroyed.[13]

The Virgin of the Rocks

While Leonardo was working for Duke Ludovico, he had two important painting commissions. One was to do an oil painting to go in a big altarpiece for the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception. Leonardo did the painting twice. He left one with the monks in Milan, and took the other painting to France where it is now in the Louvre Museum. The paintings are both called the Virgin of the Rocks. They show a scene of the Virgin Mary and the child Jesus in a rocky mysterious landscape. Mary and Jesus are meeting with John the Baptist. There is a story (which is not in the Bible but is part of Christian tradition) about how the baby John and the baby Jesus met on the road to Egypt. In this scene John is praying and the baby Jesus raises his hand to bless John. The paintings have a strange eerie light with soft deep shadows. In the background is a lake and mountains in the mist. No painting like this had ever been done before.[13]

The Last Supper

File:The Last Supper pre
The Last Supper (1498). Milan, Italy.

Leonardo's other important painting in Milan is even more famous. It is the Last Supper. The painting shows the last meal shared by Jesus with his disciples, before his capture and death. Leonardo chose to paint the moment when Jesus has said "one of you will betray me". Leonardo tells the story of the surprise and upset that this caused to the twelve followers of Jesus.[13] He tells the story through the actions and faces of the people in the painting. Some of them are talking, some of them have stood up, some are raising their hands in horror.

The novelist Matteo Bandello saw Leonardo at work. Bandello wrote that on some days he would paint from morning till night without stopping to eat. Then for three or four days he would not paint at all. He would often just stand and look at the painting.[19] Vasari said that the prior of the convent was very annoyed. He asked Ludovico to tell Leonardo to work faster. Vasari said that Leonardo was worried because he did not think that he could paint the face of Jesus well enough. Leonardo told the Duke that he might use the face of the prior as his model for Judas, the traitor.[9]

When it was finished, everyone that saw it said that the painting was a masterpiece.[9] But Leonardo had not used proper fresco for the painting. He had used tempera over gesso, which is not usually used for wall painting. Soon the painting started to grow mold and flake off the wall. In a hundred years it was "completely ruined".[5] Even though in some places the paint has fallen right off the wall, the painting is so popular that it is printed and copied more that any other religious painting in the world.

Working life 1499 –1513

In 1499, Ludovico il Moro was overthrown. Leonardo left Milan with his servant Salai and a friend, Luca Pacioli, who was a mathematician. They went to Venice. Leonardo worked as a military architect and engineer. Because Venice is a city on many islands, Leonardo tried to think of ways to defend the city from a naval attack.[5][8]

In 1500, Leonardo went back to Florence, taking his "household" of servants and apprentices with him. The monks from the monastery of The Holy Annunciation gave Leonardo a home and a large workshop. In 2005, some buildings which were used by the Department of Military Geography were being restored. The restorers discovered that part of the building was Leonardo's studio.[20]

File:Leonardo - St. Anne
The Virgin and Child with St. Anne and St. John the Baptist (c. 1499–1500)—National Gallery, London

The Virgin and Child with St Anne and John the Baptist

Leonardo started work on a new painting. He drew a large "cartoon". (This means: a drawing that is a plan for the painting.) The cartoon showed the Virgin Mary sitting on the knee of her mother, St Anne. Mary holds the baby Jesus in her arms. Jesus stretches out his hands to his young cousin John the Baptist. Vasari says that everyone was so amazed by the beautiful drawing that "men and women, young and old" came in large groups to see it "as if they were attending a great festival".[9] The drawing is now in the National Gallery, London. Even though it is old and faded and is kept in a dark room, people go to the gallery to sit in front of it every day. Like many of Leonardo's projects, the painting was never done.

The Battle of Anghiari

In 1502 and 1503, Leonardo worked for a powerful noble called Cesare Borgia, who was the son of Pope Alexander VI. He travelled around Italy with Borgia, as a military architect and engineer.[5] Late in 1503, Leonardo returned to Florence. He rejoined the Guild of St Luke. He was given a very important commission. The Signoria (Town Council) of the City of Florence wanted two large frescos painted on the walls of the most important room of the Signoria Palace. They chose the two most famous painters, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. Michelangelo was to paint the Battle of Cascina.[5]

Leonardo began the project by studying and drawing the faces of angry men and fighting horses. These drawings can still be seen in his notebooks. But unfortunately, this was to be another failure for Leonardo. When he painted the picture on the wall, instead of using fresco, he mixed the paints with oil. The paint would not dry. Leonardo lit some fires to dry it, and the painting melted. We have some idea what the painting was like, because Peter Paul Rubens drew a copy of the middle part. After a time, the town council covered it up and got somebody else to paint the wall. Michelangelo did not finish his painting either, because the Pope called him to Rome.[5]

The Mona Lisa

File:Mona
Mona Lisa or La Gioconda (1503–1505/1507)—Louvre, Paris, France

While Leonardo was working at his studio in Florence, he painted the most famous portrait that has ever been painted, the Mona Lisa. It is a small picture, painted in oil paint on a wooden panel. It shows the face, upper body and hands of a woman. She is very plainly dressed. For a portrait, a woman would usually put on her best clothes and jewellery. Mona Lisa has a dark dress and a fine black veil over her head. Leonardo often left symbols in his paintings that give clues about the person. The unusual thing about this picture is the smile. The smile is the clue to her name: Mona Lisa Giacondo. Giacondo means "the joking one". (Mona is short for Madonna which means "My Lady".)

The reason why the painting is so famous is that it seems to be full of mystery. Mona Lisa's eyes look out at the viewer. But no-one can guess what she is thinking. Her eyes and her mouth seem to be smiling. This is very unusual in a portrait painting. Most people in portraits look very serious. It is hard to tell what Mona Lisa's exact expression is. When a person wants to read another person's feelings, they look at the corners of their mouth and eyes. But Leonardo has painted soft shadows in the corners of Mona Lisa's mouth and eyes, to disguise her expression. The soft shadows are also found on the sides of her face, her neck and hands. The way that Leonardo uses shadow is called "sfumato" (which is an Italian word for "smoke"). Vasari said that the picture was so beautifully painted that every other artist who looked at it thought that they could never paint so well.[9]

Working life, 1506 –1516

In 1506, Leonardo went back to Milan with his pupils, and lived in his own house in Porta Orientale. Some of the pupils became painters: Bernardino Luini, Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio and Marco D'Oggione.[8] D'Oggione made several copies of the Last Supper. Luini made a copy of the Virgin of the Rocks. Boltraffio (and the others) painted many Madonna and Child pictures which can still be seen in art galleries and churches. One of pupils was a young nobleman called Count Francesco Melzi. Melzi never became a very good painter, but he loved Leonardo and stayed with him until the day he died.

In September 1513 Leonardo went to Rome and lived there until 1516. He lived in the Vatican. The three greatest painters of the High Renaissance, Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael were all working in Rome at the same time.[5] Even though their names are often said together as if they were friends, they were not. Leonardo at this time was in his sixties, Michelangelo was middle-aged. He was not friendly to either Leonardo or Raphael. Raphael was a very clever young painter who learnt a lot by looking at the pictures painted by Leonardo and Michelangelo. But neither of them was ever his teacher.

In October 1515, King Francis I of France captured Milan.[19] On December 19, there was a meeting of Francis I and Pope Leo X, in Bologna. Leonardo went to the meeting with Pope Leo.[8][21][22] Leonardo made an amazing toy to entertain King Francis. It was a life-sized mechanical lion that could walk. It had doors in its chest which opened, and a bunch of lilies came out. Lilies were the royal symbol of the French Kings.[9]

Old age, 1516 –1519

File:Leonardo Da Vinci's
Clos Lucé in France, where Leonardo lived from 1516 to 1519

In 1516, Francis I invited Leonardo to go to France with him. He gave Leonardo a beautiful house called Clos Lucé (sometimes called "Cloux"). It is near the king's palace, Chateau Amboise. Leonardo spent the last three years of his life at Clos Lucé, with his faithful friend and apprentice, Count Melzi. The king gave Leonardo a pension of 10,000 scudi.[5] One of the last paintings that Leonardo did was a picture of John the Baptist. His model was Salai, with his beautiful long curling hair.

When Leonardo was dying, he asked for a priest to come, so that he could make his confession and receive Holy Communion.[9] Leonardo died at Clos Lucé, on May 2, 1519. King Francis had become a close friend. Vasari says that the King held Leonardo's head in his arms as he died. In his will, he asked that sixty beggars should follow his casket in procession. He was buried in the Chapel of the Chateau Amboise.

Leonardo had never married and had no children of his own. In his will, he left his money, his books and most of his paintings to Count Melzi. Leonardo also remembered his other pupil Salai and his servant Battista di Vilussis, who each received half of Leonardo's vineyards near Milan. Leonardo's left to his serving woman a black cloak with a fur edge.[23] Salai was the owner of Leonardo's most famous oil painting, the Mona Lisa. He still owned it a few years later when he died, after fighting in a duel.[24]

King Francis said: "There had never been another man born in the world who knew as much as Leonardo, not so much about painting, sculpture and architecture, as that he was a very great philosopher."[25][26]

Drawings

Leonardo did not paint very many pictures. But he drew hundreds of quick sketches, plans, maps and detailed drawings. This is the way that he recorded all the interesting things that he saw, studied and thought about.

Some of Leonardo's drawings are "studies" for paintings. In these drawings Leonardo planned the things he was going to paint. Some studies are plans for whole paintings. One of these paintings is the large beautiful drawing of the Madonna and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist that is now in the National Gallery, London.

Many of the studies show "details" that Leonardo wanted to get just right. One study shows a very detailed perspective drawing of the ruined buildings in the background of the painting of the Magi. Other studies show hands, faces, drapery, plants, horses and babies.[27] The earliest drawing by Leonardo that has a date on it, is a Landscape of the Arno Valley, 1473, which shows the river, the mountains, Montelupo Castle and the farmlands beyond it in great detail.[8][27]

Leonardo's notebooks

File:Da Vinci Vitruve Luc
The Vitruvian Man (c. 1485) Accademia, Venice
File:Da Vinci Studies of Embryos Luc
A page from Leonardo's journal showing his study of a foetus in the womb (c. 1510) Royal Library, Windsor Castle

Leonardo studied things all his life. He did not go to university to study. He studied by looking at things in the world around him. He looked at things to see how they were made and how they worked. He drew the things that he saw and the discoveries that he made into his notebooks, and made notes about them. Many of his notebooks are now in museums. There are 13,000 pages of notes and drawings. Many of these are scientific studies.[13]

Leonardo's notebooks are hard to read because he wrote backwards in "mirror writing". Some people think that perhaps he was trying to keep his work secret. This is not true. Leonardo wrote (and sometimes drew) with his left hand. In those days pens were made from a quill (a large feather) that was cut with a pen-knife on the end. It is hard for a left-handed person to write with a quill in the ordinary way, but quite easy to write backwards.

It is likely that Leonardo planned to publish the studies in his notebooks. He organised many pages carefully, with one study taking up the front and back of each page. There is a page with drawings and writing about the human heart and a page about the womb and the fetus.[28] One page shows drawings of the muscles of a shoulder and another page shows how an arm works.[29]

The notebooks were not published in Leonardo's lifetime. After he died, they were divided between different people who had known him. They are nearly all in museums or libraries such as Windsor Castle, the Louvre, and the British Library. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana (a library) in Milan has the twelve-volume Codex Atlanticus.[13]

Studies

Some of the things that Leonardo studied are:[2]

Designs and inventions

Many of the drawings and notes in Leonardo's notebooks are designs, plans and inventions.

Some of the things that Leonardo designed are:[2]

  • Costumes for parades, carnivals and theatre. These were probably for Duke Federico's court. They include armour, and a ferocious dragon.
  • War machines such as an armour-plated tank, an enormous cross bow and a horrible horse-driven leg-chopper. None of these things were ever made in Leonardo's lifetime.
  • Dams and canals for rivers.
  • A wooden bridge that could be carried flat on waggons and unfolded and put together at the river.
  • Flying things with wings that flapped, a helicopter, a parachute and a hang glider. One of Leonardo's servants was injured, trying out the hang glider. The parachute has been made and tested in modern times, and it does work.
  • Churches and castles. It is possible that the Castle of Locarno, in the south of Switzerland was designed by Leonardo.[30] No other building that he designed was built.

Leonardo's studies, designs and inventions

Other pages

References

Reading

  • Daniel Arasse (1997). Leonardo da Vinci. Konecky & Konecky. ISBN 1 56852 1987. 
  • Liana Bortolon (1967). The Life and Times of Leonardo. Paul Hamlyn, London. ISBN 075251587X. 
  • Hugh Brigstoke (2001). The Oxford Companion the Western Art. USA: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198662033. 
  • Gene A. Brucker (1969). Renaissance Florence. Wiley and Sons. ISBN 0 471 11370 0. 
  • Angela Ottino della Chiesa (1967). The Complete Paintings of Leonardo da Vinci. Penguin Classics of World Art series. ISBN 0-14-00-8649-8. 
  • Frederich Hartt (1970). A History of Italian Renaissance Art. Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0500231362. 
  • Andrew Martindale (1972). The Rise of the Artist. Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0-5000-56006. 
  • Charles D. O'Malley and J. B. de C. M. Sounders (1952). Leonardo on the Human Body: The Anatomical, Physiological, and Embryological Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci. With Translations, Emendations and a Biographical Introduction. Henry Schuman, New York. 
  • A.E. Popham (1946). The Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci. Jonathan Cape. ISBN 0 224 60462 7. 
  • Ilan Rachum (1979). The Renaissance, an Illustrated Encyclopedia. Octopus. ISBN 0-7064-0857-8. 
  • Jean Paul Richter (1970). The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci. Dover. ISBN 0-486-22572-0 and ISBN 0-486-22573-9 (paperback).  2 volumes. A reprint of the original 1883 edition.
  • Paolo Rossi (2001). The Birth of Modern Science. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0631227113. 
  • Bruno Santi (1990). Leonardo da Vinci. Scala / Riverside. 
  • Jack Wasserman (1975). Leonardo da Vinci. Abrams. ISBN 0-8109-0262-1. 
  • Giorgio Vasari (1568). Lives of the Artists. Penguin Classics, trans. George Bull 1965. ISBN 0-14-044-164-6. 
  • Alessandro Vezzosi (1997 (English translation)). Leonardo da Vinci: Renaissance Man. Thames & Hudson Ltd, London. ISBN 0-500-30081-X. 
  • Frank Zollner (2003). Leonardo da Vinci: The Complete Paintings and Drawings. Taschen. ISBN 3-8228-1734-1 (hardback).  [The chapter "The Graphic Works" is by Frank Zollner & Johannes Nathan].

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Persondata
NAME Leonardo da Vinci
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (full name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Italian artist and polymath
DATE OF BIRTH April 15, 1452(1452-04-15)
PLACE OF BIRTH Anchiano by Vinci, Italy
DATE OF DEATH May 2, 1519
PLACE OF DEATH Clos Lucé, France

krc:Леонардо да Винчи


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