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Lesser occipital nerve: Wikis

  

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Nerve: Lesser occipital nerve
Gray1210.png
Side of neck, showing chief surface markings. (Lesser occip. nerve labeled at center right.)
Gray805.png
The nerves of the scalp, face, and side of neck. (Smaller occipital visible below and to the left of the ear.)
Latin nervus occipitalis minor
Gray's subject #210 926
Innervates    Cutaneous innervation of the posterior aspect of the auricle and mastoid region
From cervical plexus (C2)

The lesser occipital nerve or small occipital nerve is a cutaneous spinal nerve arising between the first and second cervical vertebrae, along with the greater occipital nerve. It innervates the scalp in the lateral area of the head behind the ear.

Contents

Path

It arises from the lateral branch of the ventral ramus of the second cervical nerve, sometimes also from the third; it curves around and ascends along the posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoideus.

Near the cranium it perforates the deep fascia, and is continued upward along the side of the head behind the auricula, supplying the skin and communicating with the greater occipital, the great auricular, and the posterior auricular branch of the facial.

The smaller occipital varies in size, and is sometimes duplicated.

It gives off an auricular branch, which supplies the skin of the upper and back part of the auricula, communicating with the mastoid branch of the great auricular.

This branch is occasionally derived from the greater occipital nerve.

Clinical significance

Disorder in this nerve causes occipital neuralgia.

Additional images

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained within it may be outdated.








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