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An experience point (often abbreviated to Exp or XP) is a unit of measurement used in many role-playing games (RPGs) and role-playing video games to quantify a player character's progression through the game. Experience points are generally awarded for the completion of quests, overcoming obstacles and opponents, and for successful role-playing.

In many RPGs, characters start as fairly weak and untrained. When a sufficient amount of experience is obtained, the character "levels up", or gains a superior level. Such an event usually increases the character's statistics, such as health points and strength, and may permit the character to acquire new abilities or improve existing ones.

In some (usually Dungeons & Dragons-derived) games, experience points are used to improve characters in discrete experience levels; in other games, such as GURPS and the World of Darkness games, experience points are spent on specific abilities or attributes chosen by the player.

In most games, as the difficulty of the challenge increases, the experience rewarded for overcoming it also increases. As players gain more experience points, the amount of experience needed to gain new abilities typically increases. Alternatively, games keep the amount of experience points per level constant, but progressively lower the experience gained for the same tasks as the character's level increases. Thus, as the player character strengthens from gaining experience, they are encouraged to accept tasks that are commensurate with their improved abilities in order to advance.

Contents

Types

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Level-based progression

In games derived from Dungeons & Dragons (D&D), an accumulation of experience points increases a character's “level”, a number that represents a character's overall skill and experience. To level or level up means to gain enough XP to reach the next level. By gaining a level, a character's abilities or stats will increase, making the character stronger and able to accomplish more difficult tasks, including safely battling stronger enemies, gaining access to more powerful abilities (such as spells or combat techniques), fix or disable more complex mechanical devices, or resolve increasingly difficult social challenges.

Typically levels are associated with a character class, and many systems will allow combinations of classes, allowing a player to customize how their character develops.

Experience levels fell out of vogue during the late 1980s and most of the 1990s, but began to come back with the 2000 release of D&D 3rd Edition and the d20 System. Some systems that use a level-based experience system also incorporate the ability to purchase specific traits with a set amount of experience; for example, D&D 3rd Edition bases the creation of magical items around a system of experience expenditure (known as burning xp) and also uses a system of feat selection which closely matches the advantages of systems such as GURPS or the Hero System. The d20 system also introduced the concept of prestige classes which bundle sets of mechanics, character development and requirements into a package which can be "leveled" like an ordinary class.

Some games have a level cap, or a limit of levels available. For example, no player can currently get higher than level 138 in the online game RuneScape. Some games have a dynamic level cap, where the level cap is dependent upon the levels of the average player (so it gradually increases).

Skill-based progression

In some systems, such as classic Traveller or the Basic Role-Playing system, progression is based on increasing individual statistics (skills, rank and other features) of the character, and is not driven by the acquisition of (general) experience points.

Free-form advancement

Free-form advancement is a method employed by many modern role-playing systems, such as GURPS. It allows the player to select which skills to advance by allocating a predetermined number of "points". Players may devote every point to one skill, boosting it relative to others, or may spread points over a wider range of skills to produce a balanced character. While free-form advancement usually is much more powerful, it is also more complex. Some games therefore simplify character creation and advancement by suggesting packages or templates of pre-selected ability sets.

Cash-In Advancement

A Cash-in Experience advancement system uses experience points to "purchase" such character advancements as Class Levels, Skill Points, new skills, feats or increasing saving throw bonuses or base attribute points each of which has a set cost in experience points with set limits on the maximum bonuses that can be purchased at a given time usually once per game session. Once experience points are used thus they are "spent" and are erased from the character record or marked as spent and cannot be used again. Dice & Glory and Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay are examples of games that use a cash-in advancement system.

Video games

Since many early computer role-playing games (CRPGs) are derived from Dungeons & Dragons,[1] most use a level-based experience system (also called Perks).

In many games, characters must obtain a minimum level to perform certain actions, such as wielding a particular weapon, entering a restricted area, or earning the respect of a non-player character. Some games use a system of "character levels", where higher-level characters hold an absolute advantage over those of lower level. In these games, statistical character management is usually kept to a minimum. Other games use a system of "skill levels" to measure advantages in terms of specific aptitudes, such as weapon handling, spell-casting proficiency, and stealthiness. These games allow the players to customize their characters to a greater extent.

Some games, notably multi-user dungeons (MUDs) and massively multi-player online RPGs (MMORPGs), place a limit on the experience a character gains from a single encounter or challenge, to reduce the effectiveness of power-leveling.

Remorting is another technique that, while encouraging power-leveling, alleviates its ill effects by giving the player a sense of achievement as it maintains balance with other characters of lower level within the game.

History

Perks are special bonuses that video game players can equip to their characters to give special abilities[2].

The first video game which used Perks may have been the 1997 RPG game Fallout[2]. Since then, Perks had been used in various video games, even for FPS like COD: Modern Warfare 2 or Killing Floor, or action games like Metal Gear Online[2].

Remorting

Remorting (also known as rebirth, ascending or reincarnating) is a technique within some role-playing games, notably MUDs, whereby once the player character reaches a specified level limit the player can elect to start over with a weaker version of his or her character. A perfect example of this occurs in the Disgaea games. However, the bonuses that are given are dependent on several factors, which generally involve the stats of the character before the reincarnation occurs. The character in exchange gains an advantage that was previously unavailable, usually access to different races, avatars, classes, skills, or otherwise inaccessible play areas within the game. In City of Heroes when a character hits the level cap, a new archetype (analogous to a character class) becomes available; the player retains the high-level character but can assume this previously restricted role. A symbol often identifies a remorted character.

The term's origins are unclear but are thought to distinguish re-mortals (reborn characters) from mortals (normal characters) and immortals (game administrators). An alternate explanation comes from MUDs, in which players may apply to become immortal characters who tend to a game's administrative issues, development, or design. Administrators are generally expected to distance themselves from gameplay; interaction with other players may be severely limited. When an administrator chooses to vacate his or her position to resume playing the game—usually from level one just as with any new character—he or she is said to have remorted.

Power-leveling

Power-leveling is the process of sustained, fast leveling in CRPGs. Many role-players disdain the practice, believing that this attempt to "beat" a game misses the point of role-playing. Also, by power-leveling high over the game developers' intended level, the challenge of the game decreases tremendously.

Power-leveling can mean different things depending on whether or not other people are playing the game. Sometimes in single-player games it refers to a player strategically playing with the sole intent of gaining experience points as quickly as possible. This is frequently done by finding opponents that give a lot of experience points for very little challenge or by going to an area with very powerful monsters and making great use of the game's healing system. This definition can also be used in multi-player games, but it is typically displaced by a much more charged meaning.

Power-leveling is most frequently employed in multi-player games, where it usually refers to a player that is of much greater power assisting a player of much lower power in defeating enemies that are far too powerful for the low-level player, but are easily and quickly killed by the more powerful player. This practice is also referred to as "tanking", where a high level character or "tank" will act similarly to the real world counterpart by acting as a shield for the low level character, thus allowing him to defeat the high level challenge without fear of penalties associated with such challenges. Defeating high level challenges rewards the lower level player with experience points more rapidly than normal. In general this is considered a form of cheating, or manipulation of the game system for unintended results. However, some view it as a strategic means of gaining levels, especially on single-player RPGs and among friends on MMORPGs.

Another way players may gain levels is "grinding" or constantly staying in one area of the game and killing monsters over and over. If kept up long enough it can make for very fast leveling. It is not considered cheating, but can become very tedious, and can make for there not being enough monsters left for other players to fight.

To combat power-leveling, game designers have devised better means of rewarding a player based on their actual contribution to the completion of the task. Another method used is to cap how much experience a character can gain at any single moment. For example, the game might not allow a character to gain more than 20% of the experience they need to level up by defeating an enemy. This is controversial in that it also punishes players who are skilled enough to face challenges more difficult than regular players or that band together with other players to face more difficult challenges. Another anti-power-leveling method is to base the experience given out on the highest level within the party that killed the enemy—power-levelers get around this by what could be called "passive power-leveling", where a high level character who has access to healing abilities heals the lower level character as he or she fights the enemy, or places beneficial spells on the low-level character while placing curses on the enemy.

Power-leveling increased in EverQuest as it became more common to sell characters through the Internet. Techniques of kill stealing and power-gaming would make this pursuit considerably more attractive.

Some online companies offer power-leveling services, whereby a customer pays a fixed amount for the company to level up their character. Essentially, the customer provides the company with the username and password for their account, and the company assigns an employee to play the character for the customer until a desired level is reached. However, this is usually against a game's rules and will often result in the character being banned and/or legal action being taken against those involved. Some of the said services have been also known for marketing their services through spamming, which adds to the dubious legality of power-leveling services.[citation needed]

References

See also


Level Up
Format Childrens, Entertainment
Created by BBC
Developed by Pete Davies
Presented by Sam Nixon
Mark Rhodes
Ayesha Asantewaa
Country of origin United Kingdom
Production
Running time 60 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel BBC
Original run 3 April 2006 – 1 September 2006
External links
Official website

Level Up was a UK children's TV programme broadcast by the BBC on CBBC Two and the CBBC Channel. It was launched on the 3 April 2006 and replaced Xchange. The show was an hour long and during the school year broadcasts at 7:30am until 8:30am. During the school holidays, including Bank Holidays, the show aired from 9.30am until 10:30am.

The show was presented by Mark Rhodes and Sam Nixon who rose to fame after coming second and third, respectively, in the second series of Pop Idol. They were assisted by Ayesha Asantewaa, presenter of The Big Toe Radio Show, who read out the "Glitches and Fixes". Level Up was transmitted live from studio TC10 at BBC Television Centre in London.

The first series completed its four month run after it finished on 1 September 2006. A second series for 2007 was initially planned, although this eventually became Do Something Different.

Features
Feature Desctipion
Infoburst where Sam and Mark researched the answer to questions sent in by viewers and answered them on the show.
The Techno Timeline which took Sam and Mark back in time and explains about the technology of the time. There is also information about new technology that is likely to be seen in the future.
Have-a-go where a viewer sent in a short video about one of their skills (e.g. musical instrument, sport, etc.), and if chosen, is asked to come into the studio and let Sam and Mark have a go. The have-a-goer has to choose who was the best out of Sam or Mark and produces a small video of their tips and tricks for their skill which was then uploaded to the Level Up website. Sam was the overall winner.
60 Seconds of Newsround the CBBC news programme was aired at around 7:15 AM and again 7:45 AM during the show to keep viewers up-to-date on the latest news.
Instant Message where a particular question was answered on the message board and some of the answers were read out on the show.
Billions Things short humorous video clips of ideas of what to do if you're bored.
R8 Your M8 where two friends or 'mates' were given the choice of several 'missions' to earn points. Six points won a V.I.P. visit to the Level Up studio. The missions included feeding a giraffe, cleaning up elephant faeces and running around with a silly costume on whilst dancing to music.
The Cheat Bros where Sam and Mark gave 'advice' on a particular subject, such as acting, moving to secondary school, football, etc.
Player 2 Ready was a feature of the show where a viewer sends in a video about their interest, such as a club, sport, etc.
The Next Level which allowed viewers interested in a certain job to enter into a competition, the winner of which is given the opportunity to work in a real-life environment, e.g. marine biology, sport commentary, etc.
The Next Level
Job Child Mentor Boss
Fashion Designer Imogen Erica Suet
Cook Blessing
Dog Trainer Matthew Nicky Richard
Sports Commentator Michael Paul
Radio Journalist Kate Rose Will
Games Demonstrator Brendan Callum Tim
Archaeologist Kareem Andrew Jim
Holiday Rep Tom Louise Ashley
Film director Grace Tim
Marine Biologist Mubeena Janelle Simon

Contents

Experts

Sam and Mark were aided by young experts from a particular field. An integral part of the show, they occasionally presented a section of the programme live in the studio with Sam and Mark, explaining about how viewers could get involved, i.e. the environmental expert, Sarah [1], encouraged viewers to be more eco-friendly or Rishi, the technology expert, who informed viewers about the latest technological developments. The experts were:

Area Expert
Technology Rishi
Environment Sarah
Fashion Imogen
Film Ollie
Sport Stuart
Dance Matthew Evan Garrett
Music Jack
Books Maxine Felicity Stride
Animals Peter Cooper
Cooking Blessing
Gardening Emily
Pelvic Expert Ian Hatchard

Incidentally, two of the 'experts' have featured on the work experience part of the show, The Next Level.

Gamers

On each programme, three of the twelve gamers were contacted at home via a webcam using Skype, although the connection was often temporarily lost. They joined in with the discussions, are set challenges, try and help out with the 'glitches and fixes', and make video diaries of special events/trips/holidays they go on.

The twelve gamers from the first series:

  • Maria
  • Avijit
  • Callam
  • Chloe
  • Eleanor
  • Lauren
  • Rhys
  • Naomi
  • Ryan
  • Alice
  • Bradley
  • Sam

Sam won the 12th Gamer competition.

The Gamer Weekender

The Gamer Weekender was a special weekend arranged by Level Up of fun and challenges and the chance for all the gamers to meet up. The weekender included several logic, team and competitive challenges with prizes at the end. For each team challenge they passed the gamers would receive two or three 'creds' (heavy weights) which they used to try and raise up a water level in a tall transparent cylinder. In the end, the gamers didn't quite raise the water level high enough but were given another chance and finally managed to raise the water level and win the prize of a ride in a limousine, a helicopter flight and a barbecue prepared by Sam & Mark.

Glitches and fixes

Glitches and Fixes

Glitches and Fixes was the part of the show where Ayesha sorts through the 'glitches' and 'fixes'. 'Glitches' were problems which the viewers send in, either as a plain text message or a video.

'Fixes' were the other viewers suggestions to these problems which they phone, text or email in. The best were published on the programme's website for other viewers to vote on the top five.

Group glitches

Group glitches were glitches sent in by a group (e.g. friends, club, etc.) that would require more effort to fix than normal glithes. Group glitches were fixed by sending along a pro-gamer - someone who specialized in the field of the glitch - e.g. a girls football club sent in a group glitch and Level Up sent along one of the England's top women's football players to help them.

See also

External links


Template:This article is about

Level Up
Format Childrens, Entertainment
Created by BBC
Presented by Sam Nixon
Mark Rhodes
Ayesha Asantewaa
Country of origin United Kingdom
Production
Running time 60 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel BBC
Original run April 3, 2006September 1, 2006
External links
Official website

Level Up was a UK children's TV programme broadcast by the BBC on CBBC Two and the CBBC Channel. It was launched on the 3 April 2006 and replaced Xchange. The show was an hour long and during the school year broadcasts at 7:30am until 8:30am. During the school holidays, including Bank Holidays, the show aired from 9.30am until 10:30am.

The show was presented by Mark Rhodes and Sam Nixon who rose to fame after coming second and third, respectively, in the second series of Pop Idol. They were assisted by Ayesha Asantewaa, presenter of The Big Toe Radio Show, who read out the "Glitches and Fixes". Level Up was transmitted live from studio TC10 at BBC Television Centre in London.

The first series completed its four month run after it finished on 1 September, 2006. A second series for 2007 was initially planned, although this eventually became Do Something Different.

Contents

Features of the show

  • Infoburst, where Sam and Mark researched the answer to questions sent in by viewers and answered them on the show.
  • The Techno Timeline, which took Sam and Mark back in time and explains about the technology of the time. There is also information about new technology that is likely to be seen in the future.
  • Have-a-go, where a viewer sent in a short video about one of their skills (e.g. musical instrument, sport, etc.), and if chosen, is asked to come into the studio and let Sam and Mark have a go. The have-a-goer has to choose who was the best out of Sam or Mark and produces a small video of their tips and tricks for their skill which was then uploaded to the Level Up website. Sam was the overall winner.
  • 60 Seconds of Newsround, the CBBC news programme was aired at around 7:15 AM and again 7:45 AM during the show to keep viewers up-to-date on the latest news.
  • Instant Message, where a particular question was answered on the message board and some of the answers were read out on the show.
  • Billions Things, short humorous video clips of ideas of what to do if you're bored.
  • R8 Your M8, where two friends or 'mates' were given the choice of several 'missions' to earn points. Six points won a V.I.P. visit to the Level Up studio. The missions included feeding a giraffe, cleaning up elephant faeces and running around with a silly costume on whilst dancing to music.
  • The Cheat Bros, where Sam and Mark gave 'advice' on a particular subject, such as acting, moving to secondary school, football, etc.
  • Player 2 Ready was a feature of the show where a viewer sends in a video about their interest, such as a club, sport, etc.
  • The Next Level, which allowed viewers interested in a certain job to enter into a competition, the winner of which is given the opportunity to work in a real-life environment, e.g. marine biology, sport commentary, etc.

The Next Level

Job Child Mentor Boss
Fashion Designer Imogen Erica Suet
Cook Blessing
Dog Trainer Matthew Nicky Richard
Sports Commentator Michael Paul
Radio Journalist Kate Rose Will
Games Demonstrator Brendan Callum Tim
Archaeologist Kareem Andrew
Holiday Rep Tom Louise Ashley
Film director Grace Tim
Marine Biologist Mubeena Janelle Simon

The experts

Sam and Mark were aided by young experts from a particular field. An integral part of the show, they occasionally presented a section of the programme live in the studio with Sam and Mark, explaining about how viewers could get involved, i.e. the environmental expert, Sarah [1], encouraged viewers to be more eco-friendly or Rishi, the technology expert, who informed viewers about the latest technological developments. The experts were:

  • Technology - Rishi
  • Environment - Sarah
  • Fashion - Imogen
  • Film - Ollie
  • Sport - Stuart
  • Dance - Matthew Evan Garrett
  • Music - Jack
  • Books - Maxine Felicity Stride
  • Animals - Peter
  • Cooking - Blessing
  • Gardening - Emily
  • Pelvic Expert - Ian Hatchard

Incidentally, two of the 'experts' have featured on the work experience part of the show, The Next Level.

The gamers

On each programme, three of the twelve gamers were contacted at home via a webcam using Skype, although the connection was often temporarily lost. They joined in with the discussions, are set challenges, try and help out with the 'glitches and fixes', and make video diaries of special events/trips/holidays they go on.

The twelve gamers from the first series:

  • Maria
  • Avijit
  • Callam
  • Chloe
  • Eleanor
  • Lauren
  • Rhys
  • Naomi
  • Ryan
  • Alice
  • Bradley
  • Sam, who won the 12th Gamer competition.

The Gamer Weekender

The Gamer Weekender was a special weekend arranged by Level Up of fun and challenges and the chance for all the gamers to meet up. The weekender included several logic, team and competitive challenges with prizes at the end. For each team challenge they passed the gamers would receive two or three 'creds' (heavy weights) which they used to try and raise up a water level in a tall transparent cylinder. In the end, the gamers didn't quite raise the water level high enough but were given another chance and finally managed to raise the water level and win the prize of a ride in a limousine, a helicopter flight and a barbecue prepared by Sam & Mark.

Glitches and fixes

Glitches and Fixes was the part of the show where Ayesha sorts through the 'glitches' and 'fixes'. 'Glitches' were problems which the viewers send in, either as a plain text message or a video. 'Fixes' were the other viewers suggestions to these problems which they phone, text or email in. The best were published on the programme's website for other viewers to vote on the top five.

Group glitches were glitches sent in by a group (e.g. friends, club, etc.) that would require more effort to fix than normal glithes. Group glitches were fixed by sending along a pro-gamer - someone who specialized in the field of the glitch - e.g. a girls football club sent in a group glitch and Level Up sent along one of the England's top women's football players to help them.

See also

  • Sam and Mark

External links


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Leveling up article)

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Leveling up is the process in role-playing games by which characters gain levels. The purpose of leveling up is to improve character stats and reflect the character's growth in skill. Sometimes characters learn new abilities or techniques after leveling up. Leveling up is usually accomplished by aquiring a certain number of experience points.

In some games, the player is allowed to influence the leveling up process by choosing which stats are improved or what abilities are learned. In other games the process is automatic and the player has no control over it.

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