The Full Wiki

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks
IUCN Category V (Protected Landscape/Seascape)
Location Clatsop County, Oregon and Pacific County, Washington, USA
Nearest city Portland, Oregon
Coordinates 46°8′1″N 123°52′39″W / 46.13361°N 123.8775°W / 46.13361; -123.8775Coordinates: 46°8′1″N 123°52′39″W / 46.13361°N 123.8775°W / 46.13361; -123.8775
Area 1,114.55 acres (451.04 ha)
Established May 29, 1958
Visitors 245,266 (in 2005)
Governing body National Park Service
Fort Clatsop replica (destroyed by fire in 2005)

The Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, in the vicinity of the mouth of the Columbia River, commemorate the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Administration of the parks is a cooperative effort of the United States National Park Service and the states of Oregon and Washington, and was dedicated on November 12, 2004.

After reaching the Pacific Ocean, the Corps of Discovery camped at Fort Clatsop in the winter of 1805–1806. The parks also preserve several landing sites on the north bank of the river in Washington, and other sites in Oregon.

Contents

Federal sites

The federal park began as Fort Clatsop National Memorial, authorized on May 29, 1958. The memorial was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. On October 30, 2004, it was redesignated Lewis and Clark National Historical Park with expanded jurisdiction over multiple sites,[1] including:

  • Clark's Dismal Nitch[2]
  • Fort Clatsop
  • Fort to Sea Trail (dedicated on November 14, 2005)
  • Memorial to Thomas Jefferson
  • Netul Landing
  • Salt Works
  • Station Camp

Oregon state parks

Advertisements

Ecola State Park

Southern view of the coast from Ecola State Park. Haystack Rock can be seen in the distance.

Ecola was the site of the Corps of Discovery's 1806 trek over difficult terrain to see a beached whale. Today, it features several miles of hiking trails through old growth forest, and several beaches. Haystack Rock and the Needles are visible in from many sites in the park. Much of the 1985 film The Goonies was filmed there, and the final scenes of the 1991 film Point Break were filmed at Indian Beach in the park.

Fort Stevens State Park

Fort Stevens, with its 3,700-acre (1,500 ha) park, offers exploration of history, nature, and recreational opportunities. The fort was the primary military defense installation in the three fort Harbor Defense System at the mouth of the Columbia River (Fort Canby and Fort Columbia were other two).

Sunset Beach State Recreation Area

Sunset Beach is the terminus of the Fort To Sea Trail, which begins in Fort Clatsop. Sunset Beach also provides visitors with direct access to the Pacific Ocean with expansive views from Cape Disappointment to the north and Ecola State Park to the South.

Washington state parks

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse, Cape Disappointment State Park

Cape Disappointment State Park

Cape Disappointment, formerly known as Fort Canby State Park, is a 1,882-acre (762 ha) camping park on the Long Beach Peninsula, fronted by the Pacific Ocean. The park offers 27 miles (43 km) of ocean beach, two lighthouses, an interpretive center and hiking trails. The Cape Disappointment Historic District was listed on the National Register on August 15, 1975.

Fort Columbia State Park

Fort Columbia is an old coastal artillery post along the north side of the Columbia river outlet. At 593 acres (240 ha), the park includes an interpretive center focused on the fort and regional history.

It may also include Chinook Point, the site from which an American captain Gray(?) first saw the Columbia River, giving the United States a basis to claim the U.S. Northwest. Chinook Point was named a National Historic Landmark in 1961.

Footnotes

See also

References

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message