Lie: Wikis

  
  

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A lie (also called prevarication, falsehood) is a type of deception in the form of an untruthful statement, especially with the intention to deceive others, often with the further intention to maintain a secret or reputation, protect someone's feelings or to avoid a punishment or repercussion for one's actions. To lie is to state something that one knows to be false or that one does not honestly believe to be true with the intention that a person will take it for the truth. A liar is a person who is lying, who has previously lied, or who tends by nature to lie repeatedly - even when not necessary.

Lying is typically used to refer to deceptions in oral or written communication. Other forms of deception, such as disguises or forgeries, are generally not considered lies, though the underlying intent may be the same. However, even a true statement can be used to deceive. In this situation, it is the intent of being overall untruthful rather than the truthfulness of any individual statement that is considered the lie.

Contents

Classification

Types of lie

The various types of lies include the following:

The Catholic theological definition of a lie is, "To deny others access to knowledge to which they are entitled". Dictionary.com defines a lie as "a false statement made with deliberate intent to deceive; an intentional untruth; a falsehood." [1]

Big Lie

A lie which attempts to trick the victim into believing something major which will likely be contradicted by some information the victim already possesses, or by their common sense. Therefore, tricking a victim to believe such a lie is difficult.

Bluffing

To bluff is to pretend to have a capability or intention one does not actually possess. Bluffing is an act of deception that is rarely seen as immoral when it takes place in the context of a game where this kind of deception is consented to in advance by the players. For instance, a gambler who deceives other players into thinking he has different cards to those he really holds, or an athlete who hints she will move left and then dodges right is not considered to be lying (also known as a feint). In these situations, deception is acceptable and is commonly expected as a tactic.

Barefaced lie

A barefaced (or bald-faced) lie is one that is obviously a lie to those hearing it. The phrase comes from 17th-century British usage referring to those without facial hair as being seen as particularly forthright and outwardly honest, and therefore more likely to get away with telling a significant lie. A variation that has been in use almost as long is bold-faced lie, referring to the use of bold type in print to emphasize the authority of what is said, even if untrue.[2] The term bold-faced lie may also refer to a lie told with a straight and confident face (hence "bold-faced") usually with the corresponding tone of voice and emphatic body language of one confidently speaking the truth.

Contextual lie

One can state part of the truth out of context, knowing that without complete information, it gives a false impression. Likewise, one can actually state accurate facts, yet deceive with them. To say "yeah, that's right, I ate all the white chocolate, by myself" utilizing a sarcastic, offended tone, may cause the listener to assume the speaker did not mean what he said, when in fact he did.

Economical with the truth

Economical with the truth is popularly used as a euphemism for deceit, whether by volunteering false information (i.e., lying) or by deliberately holding back relevant facts. More literally, it describes a careful use of facts so as not to reveal too much information.

Emergency lie

An emergency lie is a strategic lie told when the truth may not be told because, for example, harm to a third party would result. For example, a neighbor might lie to an enraged wife about the whereabouts of her unfaithful husband, because said wife might reasonably be expected to inflict physical injury should she encounter her husband in person. Alternatively, an emergency lie could denote a (temporary) lie told to a second person because of the presence of a third.

Exaggeration

An exaggeration (or hyperbole) occurs when the most fundamental aspects of a statement are true, but only to a certain degree. It is also seen as "stretching the truth" or making something appear more powerful, meaningful, or real than it actually is.

Fabrication

A fabrication is a lie told when someone submits a statement as truth, without knowing for certain whether or not it actually is true. Although the statement may be possible or plausible, it is not based on fact. Rather, it is something made up, or it is a misrepresentation of the truth. Examples of fabrication: A person giving directions to a tourist when the person doesn't actually know the directions. Often propaganda is classified as a fabrication.

Jocose lie

Jocose lies are lies meant in jest, intended to be understood as such by all present parties. Teasing and sarcasm are examples. A more elaborate instance is seen in some storytelling traditions, where the humour comes from the storyteller's insistence that the story is the absolute truth, despite all evidence to the contrary (i.e., tall tale). There is debate about whether these are "real" lies, and different philosophers hold different views (see below).

Lie-to-children

A lie-to-children is a lie, often a platitude, which may use euphemism(s), which is told to make an adult subject acceptable to children. Common examples include "The stork brought you" (in reference to childbirth) and the existence of Santa.

Lying by obsolete signage

Examples are the continued use of old stationery that has printed information such as a previous telephone number, or advertising that remains painted on a wall after an enterprise has ceased business.

Lying by omission

One lies by omission by omitting an important fact, deliberately leaving another person with a misconception. Lying by omission includes failures to correct pre-existing misconceptions. An example is when the seller of a car declares it has been serviced regularly but does not tell that a fault was reported at the last service. Propaganda is an example of lying by omission.

Lying in trade

The seller of a product or service may advertise untrue facts about the product or service in order to gain sales, especially by competitive advantage. Many countries have enacted Consumer protection laws intended to combat such fraud. An example is the Illinois Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices Act that holds a seller liable for omission of any material fact that the buyer relies upon.

Lying through your teeth

When one lies face-to-face with the intended recipient. This also may be an expression describing the act of lying with a smile or other patronizing tone or body language.

Misleading/Dissembling

A misleading statement is one where there is no outright lie, but still retains the purpose of getting someone to believe in an untruth. "Dissembling" likewise describes the presentation of facts in a way that is literally true, but intentionally misleading.

Noble lie

A noble lie is one that would normally cause discord if uncovered, but offers some benefit to the liar and assists in an orderly society, therefore potentially beneficial to others. It is often told to maintain law, order and safety.

Perjury

Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law, or in any of various sworn statements in writing. Perjury is a crime, because the witness has sworn to tell the truth and, for the credibility of the court to remain intact, witness testimony must be relied on as truthful.

Puffery

Puffery is an exaggerated claim typically found in advertising and publicity announcements, such as "the highest quality at the lowest price," or "always votes in the best interest of all the people," or "even a jeweler cannot tell it from a genuine diamond." Such statements are unlikely to be true - but cannot be proven false and so do not violate trade laws, especially as the consumer is expected to be able to tell that it is not the absolute truth.

Compliments and false reassurances

"That looks very nice on you." White lies or exaggerations intended to please the other person. "Everything is going to be alright".

White lie

A white lie would cause only relatively minor discord if it were uncovered, and typically offers some benefit to the hearer. White lies are often used to avoid offense, such as complimenting something one finds unattractive. In this case, the lie is told to avoid the harmful realistic implications of the truth. As a concept, it is largely defined by local custom and cannot be clearly separated from other lies with any authority.

Augustine's taxonomy of lies

Augustine of Hippo wrote two books about lying: On Lying (De Mendacio) and Against Lying (Contra Mendacio).[3] He describes each book in his later work, Retractions. Based on the location of De Mendacio in Retractions, it appears to have been written about A.D. 395.[4] The first work, On Lying, begins: "Magna quæstio est de Mendacio". From his text, it can be derived that St. Augustine divided lies into eight categories, listed in order of descending severity:

  • Lies in religious teaching.
  • Lies that harm others and help no one.
  • Lies that harm others and help someone.
  • Lies told for the pleasure of lying.
  • Lies told to "please others in smooth discourse."
  • Lies that harm no one and that help someone.
  • Lies that harm no one and that save someone's life.
  • Lies that harm no one and that save someone's "purity."

Augustine believed that "jocose lies" are not, in fact, lies.

Love and war

The cliché "All is fair in love and war"[5][6] finds justification for lies used to gain advantage in these situations. Sun Tzu declared that "All warfare is based on deception." Machiavelli advised in the Prince "never to attempt to win by force what can be won by deception," and Thomas Hobbes wrote in Leviathan: "In war, force and fraud are the two cardinal virtues."

Psychology of lying

The capacity to lie is noted early and nearly universally in human development. Social psychology and developmental psychology are concerned with the theory of mind, which people employ to simulate another's reaction to their story and determine if a lie will be believable. The most commonly cited milestone, what is known as Machiavellian intelligence, is at the age of about four and a half years, when children begin to be able to lie convincingly. Before this, they seem simply unable to comprehend why others don't see the same view of events that they do — and seem to assume that there is only one point of view, which is their own.

Young children learn from experience that stating an untruth can avoid punishment for misdeeds, before they develop the theory of mind necessary to understand why it works. In this stage of development, children will sometimes tell outrageous and unbelievable lies, because they lack the conceptual framework to judge whether a statement is believable, or even to understand the concept of believability.

When children first learn how lying works, they lack the moral understanding of when to refrain from doing it. It takes years of watching people tell lies, and the results of these lies, to develop a proper understanding. Propensity to lie varies greatly between children, some doing so habitually and others being habitually honest. Habits in this regard are likely to change in early adulthood.

Those with Parkinson's disease show difficulties in deceiving others, difficulties that link to prefrontal hypometabolism. This suggests a link between the capacity for dishonesty and integrity of prefrontal functioning.[7]

Pseudologia fantastica is a term applied by psychiatrists to the behaviour of habitual or compulsive lying.

Mythomania is the condition where there is an excessive or abnormal propensity for lying and exaggerating.[8]

A recent study found that lying takes longer than telling the truth.[9] Or, as Chief Joseph succinctly put it, "It does not require many words to speak the truth." [10]

Morality of lying

The philosophers Saint Augustine, as well as Thomas Aquinas and Immanuel Kant, condemned all lying. However, Thomas Aquinas also had an argument for lying. According to all three, there are no circumstances in which one may lie. One must be murdered, suffer torture, or endure any other hardship, rather than lie, even if the only way to protect oneself is to lie. Each of these philosophers gave several arguments against lying, all compatible with each other. Among the more important arguments are:

  1. Lying is a perversion of the natural faculty of speech, the natural end of which is to communicate the thoughts of the speaker.
  2. When one lies, one undermines trust in society.

Belief systems

It is alleged[11] that some belief systems may find lying to be justified. Leo Tolstoy is cited[12] as describing religious institutions as "the product of deception [and] lies for a good purpose".

Lying in the Bible

The Old Testament and New Testament of the Bible both contain statements that God cannot lie (Num 23:19, Ps 89:35, Hab. 2:3, Heb 6:13–18).

Various passages of the Bible feature exchanges that are conditionally critical of lying (Prov 6:16–19, Ps. 5:6), (Lev 19:11, Pr. 14:5, Pr. 30:6, Zep 3:13 ), (Isa 28:15, Da 11:27). Most famously, in the Ten Commandments: "Thou shalt not bear false witness" (Exodus 20:2-17, Deuteronomy 5:6-21), a specific reference to perjury.

Other passages feature exchanges where lying seems to be conditionally promoted. (However some Christians would argue that lying is never promoted, but that even those who are righteous in God's eyes sin sometimes.) Old Testament accounts of lying include:[13]

  • Rahab lied to the king of Jericho about hiding the Hebrew spies (Joshua 2:4–5) and was not killed with those who were disobedient because of her faith (Hebrews 11:31).
  • Delilah repeatedly accused Samson of lying to her (Jg. 16:10, 13) as she interrogated him about the source of his strength.
  • Abraham instructs his wife, Sarah, to lie to the Egyptians and say that she is his sister (Gen 12:10), which leads to the Lord punishing the Egyptians (Gen 12:17–19). However, it can be argued that this was not actually a lie as she was, in fact, his half-sister (During the time of Abraham, it was not unheard of for one to marry their half-brother or half-sister).

In the New Testament, Jesus refers to the Devil as the father of lies (John 8:44) and Paul commands Christians "Do not lie to one another" (Colossians 3:9, Cf.Leviticus 19:11). St. John the Revelator reports that God said "..all liars shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death." [Rev 21:8]

Whereas most Christian theologians conclude that the Bible does not contain any intentional untruths, some scholars believe differently. Among those who conclude that the Bible contains lies and intentional untruths is Thomas Jefferson. He edited his own version of the Bible and omitted what he considered to be falsehoods. In describing the Bible, Jefferson wrote of "so much untruth, charlatanism and imposture", "roguery", "dupes and impostors", "corruptor" and "falsifications".[14]

Lying in the Qur'an

The Qur'an says that God (Allah), knows the secrets of all peoples hearts [15] and when somebody lies.[16] Therefore according to the Qur'an God cannot be fooled by lies[17] and those who lie not only destroy their souls[16] but the lie will be destroyed by the truth.[18] Liars will be called to account on the Day of Judgement[19] and God will not guide them.[20] In at least three different places, Qur'an 45:7, 51:10 and 52:11, the Qur'an idicates that liars will suffer.

The following are particularly noted for punishment: idolaters (liars against God),[21] liars who disunite believers,[22] those who lie that all good things are for themselves,[23] hypocrites,[24] those who lie against God when invited to Islam[25] or who treat God's signs as falsehoods[26]

However, one may lie to save his life.[citation needed]

Lying in pagan mythology

In Gestaþáttr, one of the sections within the Eddaic poem Hávamál, Odin states that it is advisable, when dealing with "a false foe who lies," to tell lies oneself.[27]

Consequences of lying

Once a lie has been told there can be two alternative consequences: it may be discovered or remain undiscovered.

Under some circumstances, discovery of a lie may discredit other statements by the same speaker and can lead to social or legal sanctions against the speaker, such as ostracizing or conviction for perjury. When a lie is discovered, the state of mind and behaviour of the lie teller (liar) is no longer predictable.

The discoverer of a lie may also be convinced or coerced to collaborate with the liar, becoming part of a conspiracy. They may actively propagate the lie to other parties, actively prevent the lie's discovery by other parties, or simply omit publicising the lie (a secondary lie of omission).

Deception and lies in other species

The capacity to lie has also been claimed to be possessed by non-humans in language studies with great apes. Even Koko, the gorilla made famous for learning American Sign Language has been caught red handed. After tearing a steel sink from the wall in the middle of a tantrum, she signed to her handlers that a cat did it, while she pointed to her kitten. It is unclear if this was a joke or a genuine attempt at blaming her tiny pet. Deceptive body language, such as feints that mislead as to the intended direction of attack or flight, is observed in many species including wolves. A mother bird deceives when it pretends to have a broken wing to divert the attention of a perceived predator — including unwitting humans — from the eggs in its nest to itself, most notably the killdeer.[citation needed]

Paradoxes about lying

Within any scenario where dualistic (e.g., yes/no, black/white) answers are always given, a person who we know is consistently lying would paradoxically be a source of truth. There are many such paradoxes, the most famous being known as the liar paradox, commonly expressed as "This sentence is a lie", or "This sentence is false". The so-called Epimenides paradox ("All Cretans are liars", as stated by Epimenides the Cretan) is a forerunner of this, though its status as a paradox is disputed. A class of related logic puzzles are known as knights and knaves, in which the goal is to determine who of a group of people is lying and who is telling the truth.

Lie detection

Some people may be better "lie detectors" than others, better able to distinguish a lie by facial expression, cadence of speech, certain movements, and other methods. According to David J. Lieberman PhD in Never Be Lied to Again: How to Get the Truth in Five Minutes or Less in Any Conversation or Situation, these methods can be learned. Some methods of questioning may be more likely to elicit the truth, for instance: "When was the last time you smoked marijuana?" (a leading question) is more likely to get a truthful answer than "Do you smoke pot?" Asking the question most likely to get the information you want is a skill and can be learned. Avoiding vague questioning will help avoid lies of omission or vagueness.

The question of whether lies can reliably be detected through nonverbal means is a subject of some controversy.

  • Polygraph "lie detector" machines measure the physiological stress a subject endures in a number of measures while he/she gives statements or answers questions. Spikes in stress are purported to indicate lying. The accuracy of this method is widely disputed, and in several well-known cases it was proven to have been deceived. Nonetheless, it remains in use in many areas, primarily as a method for eliciting confessions or employment screening. Polygraph results are not admissible as court evidence and are generally perceived to be pseudoscience.
  • Various truth drugs have been proposed and used anecdotally, though none are considered very reliable. The CIA attempted to find a universal "truth serum" in the MK-ULTRA project, but it was an overall failure.[citation needed]
  • A recent study found that lying takes longer than telling the truth, and thus the time to answer a question may be used as a method of lie detection. However, it has also been shown that instant-answers can be proof of a prepared lie. The only compromise is to try to surprise the victim and find a midway answer, not too quick, nor too long.[9]

Dr. Paul Ekman and Dr. Maureen O'Sullivan spent several decades studying people's ability to spot deception in a study called the Wizards Project. They studied police officers, psychologists, judges, lawyers, the CIA, FBI and the Secret Service. After studying nearly 20,000 people, they identified just over 50 people who can spot deception with great accuracy. They call these people "Truth Wizards".

Dr. Freitas-Magalhaes developed the ForensicPsy and the Psy7Faces to read lies by facial expressions.

Representations of lying in fiction

Close-up of the bronze statue depicting a walking Pinocchio, named Walking to Borås by Jim Dine
  • The Adventures of Baron Munchausen tell the story about an 18th century baron who tells outrageous, unbelievable stories, which he claims are all true.
  • The Invention of Lying is a 2009 movie depicting the fictitious invention of the first lie, starring Ricky Gervais, Jennifer Garner, Rob Lowe, and Tina Fey.
  • A famous anecdote by Parson Weems claims that George Washington once cut a tree over when he was a small child. His father asked him who cut the tree and Washington confessed his crime with the words: "I'm sorry, father, I cannot tell a lie." The anecdote has been proven to be a completely fictional story.
  • Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio was a wooden puppet often led into trouble by his propensity to lie. His nose grew with every lie; hence, long noses have become a caricature of liars.
  • The Boy Who Cried Wolf, a fable attributed to Aesop about a boy who continually lies a wolf is coming. When a wolf does appear nobody believes him anymore.
  • In the film Liar Liar, the lawyer Fletcher Reede (Jim Carrey) cannot lie for 24 hours, due to a wish of his son that magically came true.
  • Larry-Boy! And the Fib from Outer Space! was mostly about lying and telling the truth.
  • In the 1985 Max Headroom, the title character comments that one can always tell when a politician lies because "their lips move". The joke has been widely repeated and rephrased.
  • In the film Big Fat Liar, the story producer Marty Wolf (a notorious and proud liar himself) steals from student Jason Shepard, tells of a character whose lies become out of control to the point where each lie he tells causes him to grow in size.
  • Lie to Me, a TV series based on people who read lies by facial expressions. The protagonists, Dr Cal Lightman and Dr Gillian Foster are based on the above-mentioned Dr Paul Ekman and Dr Maureen O'Sullivan.
  • The Sky Is Falling, similar to The Boy Who Cried Wolf, is the story of Chicken Little, an alarmist little chicken who claims that the sky is falling. This differs from The Boy Who Cried Wolf in that Chicken Little's fabrication is the result of a misinterpretation of the facts which he believes to be true.

Covering up lies

Sir Walter Scott's famous couplet "Oh, what a tangled web we weave / When first we practice to deceive!" describes the often difficult procedure of covering up a lie so that it is not detected in the future.

In Human, All Too Human, philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche suggested that those who refrain from lying may do so only because of the difficulty involved in maintaining the lie. This is consistent with his general philosophy that divides (or ranks) people according to strength and ability; thus, some people tell the truth only out of weakness.

See also

References

  1. ^ Reference.com
  2. ^ Worldwidewords.org
  3. ^ Both may be found in English translation in Saint Augustine: Treatises on Various Subjects, edited by Roy J. Deferrari.
  4. ^ Rev. H. Browne, Newadvent.org
  5. ^ 1620 T. Shelton tr. Cervantes' Don Quixote ii. xxi. Love and warre are all one. It is lawfull to use sleights and stratagems to attaine the wished end.
  6. ^ 1578 Lyly Euphues I. 236 Anye impietie may lawfully be committed in loue, which is lawlesse.
  7. ^ Abe N, Fujii T, Hirayama K, Takeda A, Hosokai Y, Ishioka T, Nishio Y, Suzuki K, Itoyama Y, Takahashi S, Fukuda H, Mori E. (2009). Do parkinsonian patients have trouble telling lies? The neurobiological basis of deceptive behaviour. Brain. 132; 1386–1395. PubMed
  8. ^ Merriam-Webster.com
  9. ^ a b Roy Britt, "Lies Take Longer Than Truths," LiveScience.com, January 26, 2009, found at Yahoo News. Accessed January 26, 2009.
  10. ^ People.tribe.net
  11. ^ Lying For a Good Purpose: Book of Mormon Apologetics Over the Years by Clyde R. Forsberg, Jr., paper at The 2008 International Conference Twenty Years and More: Research into Minority Religions, New Religious Movements and 'the New Spirituality' at London School of Economics, 16–20th April 2008
  12. ^ Gordon K. Thomas, "The Book of Mormon in the English Literary Context of 1837," Brigham Young University Studies, Vol. XXCII, No. 1 (Winter 1987),21
  13. ^ See also O'Neill, Barry. (2003). "A Formal System for Understanding Lies and Deceit." Revision of a talk for the Jerusalem Conference on Biblical Economics, June 2000.
  14. ^ The writings of Thomas Jefferson: being his autobiography, correspondence, reports, messages, addresses, and other writings, official and private. Published by the order of the Joint Committee of Congress on the library, from the original manuscripts, deposited in the Department of State, with explanatory notes, tables of contents, and a copious index to each volume, as well as a general index to the whole, by the editor H. A. Washington. Vol. VII. Published by Taylor Maury, Washington, DC 1854.
  15. ^ Qur'an 42:24
  16. ^ a b Qur'an 9:42
  17. ^ Qur'an 9:2
  18. ^ Qur'an 17:81
  19. ^ Qur'an 29:13, 45:27, 58:18
  20. ^ Qur'an 40:28, 61:7
  21. ^ Qur'an 7:152, 18:15
  22. ^ Qur'an 9:107
  23. ^ Qur'an 16:62
  24. ^ Qur'an 59:11, 63:1
  25. ^ Qur'an 61:7
  26. ^ 64:10
  27. ^ VTA.gamall-steinn.org

Sources

  • Adler, J. E., “Lying, deceiving, or falsely implicating”, Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 94 (1997), 435–452.
  • Aquinas, T., St., “Question 110: Lying”, in Summa Theologiae (II.II), Vol. 41, Virtues of Justice in the Human Community (London, 1972).
  • Augustine, St., "On Lying" and "Against Lying", in R. J. Deferrari, ed., Treatises on Various Subjects (New York, 1952).
  • Bok, S., Lying: Moral Choice in Public and Private Life, 2d ed. (New York, 1989).
  • Carson, Thomas L. (2006). "The Definition of Lying". Nous 40:284–306.
  • Chisholm, R. M., and T. D. Feehan, “The intent to deceive”, Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 74 (1977),143–159.
  • Davids, P. H., Bruce, F.F., Brauch, M.T., & W.C. Kaiser, Hard Sayings of the Bible (InterVarsity Press, 1996).
  • Fallis, Don. (2008). "What is Lying?" Paper presented at the Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association.
  • Flyvbjerg, B., "Design by Deception". Harvard Design Magazine, no. 22, Spring/Summer 2005, 50–59.
  • Frankfurt, H. G., “The Faintest Passion”, in Necessity, Volition and Love (Cambridge, MA: CUP, 1999).
  • Frankfurt, Harry, On Bullshit (Princeton University Press, 2005).
  • Kant, I., Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, The Metaphysics of Morals and "On a supposed right to lie from philanthropy", in Immanuel Kant, Practical Philosophy, eds. Mary Gregor and Allen W. Wood (Cambridge: CUP, 1986).
  • Lakoff, George, Don't Think of an Elephant, (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2004).
  • Mahon, J. E., “Kant on Lies, Candour and Reticence”, Kantian Review, Vol. 7 (2003), 101–133.
  • Mahon, J. E., “The Definition of Lying and Deception”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008).
  • Mahon, J. E., “Lying”, Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2nd ed., Vol. 5 (Farmington Hills, Mich.: Macmillan Reference, 2006), p. 618–19.
  • Mahon, J. E., “Kant and the Perfect Duty to Others Not to Lie”, British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Vol. 14, No. 4 (2006), 653–685.
  • Mahon, J. E., “Kant and Maria von Herbert: Reticence vs. Deception”, Philosophy, Vol. 81, No. 3 (2006), 417–44.
  • Mannison, D. S., “Lying and Lies”, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 47 (1969), 132–v144.
  • O'Neill, Barry. (2003). "A Formal System for Understanding Lies and Deceit." Revision of a talk for the Jerusalem Conference on Biblical Economics, June 2000.
  • Siegler, F. A., “Lying”, American Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 3 (1966), 128–136.
  • Sorensen, Roy. (2007). "Bald-Faced Lies! Lying Without the Intent to Deceive." Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88:251–64.
  • Margaret Talbot (2007). Duped. Can brain scans uncover lies?. The New Yorker, July 2, 2007.

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Dishonesty article)

From Wikiquote

Dishonesty is the tendency towards untruth.

Sourced

  • O, what a tangled web we weave,
    When first we practice to deceive!
But when we've practised quite a while
How vastly we improve our style!
  • J. R. Pope, A Word of Encouragement. Collected in The New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, 1978.
  • When we risk no contradiction,
    It prompts the tongue to deal in fiction.
    • John Gay, Fables (1727), "The Elephant and the Bookseller"
  • Don’t lie, but don’t tell the whole truth.
  • On the wings of lies, man can only fly to the land of shame and lowness!
  • You know where you are with a complete liar, but when a chap mixes some truth with his yarns, you can't trust a word he says.
  • Just because conduct is distasteful does not mean it automatically deserves legal redress. Just ask the citizens of Sterling, Iowa, who make their town a laughingstock in the media several years ago with their quixotic effort to criminalize lying.
  • A lie will gallop halfway round the world before the truth has time to pull its breeches on.

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)

Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).

  • Wisdom and truth, the offspring of the sky, are immortal; while cunning and deception, the meteors of the earth, after glittering for a moment, must pass away.
  • Dishonor waits on perfidy. A man should blush to think a falsehood; it is the crime of cowards.
  • Lie not, neither to thyself nor men nor God. Let mouth and heart be one — beat and speak together, and make both felt in action. It is for cowards to lie.
  • I have seldom known any one who deserted truth in trifles that could be trusted in matters of importance.
  • Dissimulation in youth is the forerunner of perfidy in old age; its first appearance is the fatal omen of growing depravity and future shame.
    • Hugh Blair, p. 242.

External links

Wikipedia
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Wiktionary has an entry about dishonesty.

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to lie article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

See also LIE, liē, liě, liè, and lié

Contents

English

Most common English words: turning « village « quickly « #814: lie » supposed » original » provide

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Old English licgan, from Proto-Germanic *ligjan-, from Proto-Indo-European *legh-. Cognate with Danish ligge, Dutch liggen, German liegen, Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌰𐌽 (ligan), Swedish ligga; and with Latin lectus (bed), Irish luighe, Russian лежать.

The noun lie (position) in golf and medicine is from verb.

Verb

Infinitive
to lie

Third person singular
lies

Simple past
lay

Past participle
lain

Present participle
lying

to lie (third-person singular simple present lies, present participle lying, simple past lay, past participle lain)

  1. (intransitive) To be in a horizontal position.
    1811, Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, chapter 19 :"Without shutting herself up from her family, or leaving the house in determined solitude to avoid them, or lying awake the whole night to indulge meditation, Elinor found every day afforded her leisure enough to think of Edward"[1]
  2. (intransitive) To be placed or situated.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

Singular
lie

Plural
lies

lie (plural lies)

  1. (golf) The terrain and conditions surrounding the ball before it is struck.
  2. (medicine) The position of a fetus in the womb.
Translations

Etymology 2

Old English lēoġa, from Germanic.

Verb

Infinitive
to lie

Third person singular
lies

Simple past
lied

Past participle
lied

Present participle
lying

to lie (third-person singular simple present lies, present participle lying, simple past and past participle lied)

  1. (intransitive) To give false information intentionally.
  2. (intransitive) To convey a false image or impression.
    Photos often lie.
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Old English lyġe

Noun

Singular
lie

Plural
lies

lie (plural lies)

  1. An intentionally false statement; a falsehood.
  2. A statement intended to deceive, even if literally true; a half-truth
Derived terms
Translations

Anagrams

References

  • Notes:
  1. ^ Sense and Sensibility, Chapters 1 -19 The Free Library

Finnish

Verb

lie

  1. (nonstandard) Third-person singular potential present form of olla.
    Se on missä lie.
    It's somewhere. / I wonder where it is.

Usage notes

  • This form is used mostly in the expression above.

Synonyms

  • (3rd-pers. sg. potent. pres. of olla; standard) lienee

Anagrams


French

Etymology

From Gaulish liga (silt, sediment), from Proto-Indo-European *legh- (to lie, to lay).

Noun

lie

  1. dregs (of wine, of society)

Verb

lie

  1. First-person singular indicative present of lier.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive present of lier.
  3. Third-person singular indicative present of lier.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive present of lier.
  5. Second-person singular imperative present of lier.

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of eil
  • île

Mandarin

Pinyin

lie (form of lie0 or lie5)

  1. : expression of surprise

Pinyin syllable

lie

  1. A transliteration of any of a number of Chinese characters properly represented as having one of three tones, liē, liě, or liè.

Usage notes

English transcriptions of Chinese speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Chinese language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.


Spanish

Verb

lie (infinitive: liar)

  1. First-person singular (yo) preterite indicative form of liar.

Swedish

Noun

lie c.

Inflection for lie Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form lie lien liar liarna
Possessive form lies liens liars liarnas
  1. scythe; an instrument for mowing grass, grain, or the like.

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


an intentional violation of the truth. Lies are emphatically condemned in Scripture (John 8:44; 1 Tim. 1:9, 10; Rev. 21:27; 22:15). Mention is made of the lies told by good men, as by Abraham (Gen. 12:12, 13; 20:2), Isaac (26:7), and Jacob (27:24); also by the Hebrew midwives (Ex. 1:15-19), by Michal (1 Sam. 19:14), and by David (1 Sam. 20:6). (See ANANIAS.)

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)


Simple English

Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:

A lie is something that someone says that is not true. People that are lying often want others to believe that the lie is the truth. People can have many reasons for lying, such as if they are hiding something, if they want something from you, or white lies. Some people are pathological liars.

Different kinds of lies:

Deception
Tricking someone into believing something with a lot of lies over a longer period. "The cult members were deceived by their leader."
Distortion
Getting rid of or adding details to a fact. If a scientist says that "The medicine is safe in small amounts", a drug company can distort it and say "The scientist says the medicine is safe".
White lies
Telling a small lie make people feel better or for other reasons which do not harm anybody or anything. Saying that a person likes what another person is wearing, even though they do not, is a white lie. White lies should not be confused with sarcasm.
Exaggeration
Saying that something is more or less than it really is. "I didn't eat breakfast before class, I almost starved to death." (you were very hungry, but not actually close to dying). Also used in tall tales; "Our hero was three meters tall and strong as an elephant!" (making a story more fantastic).

Sometimes a person will say something that is not true, but they do not know it is not true. This person either learned the wrong information somewhere, or is delusional.








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