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LifeStraw includes LifeStraw Personal and LifeStraw Family, which are complementary point-of-use water filters designed by the Swiss-based Vestergaard Frandsen for tourists and people living in developing nations. There are several models of the product: LifeStraw Personal filters a minimum of 700 litres of water, enough for one person and one year. LifeStraw Family filters a minimum of 18,000 litres of water, providing safe drinking water for a family for more than two years. It removes 99.9999% of waterborne bacteria, 99.99% of viruses, and 99.9% of parasites. LifeStraw Personal kills 99.9999% of waterborne bacteria and 98.5% of viruses.

Contents

Construction

The LifeStraw Personal is a plastic tube 31 centimeters long and 30 millimeters in diameter[1], and costs around $2.00 plus shipping[2]. Water that is sucked through the straw first passes through a mesh of 100-micrometer spaces, then through a mesh of 15-micrometer spaces. Water then passes through a chamber with iodine-coated beads, killing remaining bacteria. The water passes through an empty chamber, then finally passes through active carbon, removing the iodide taste and medium-sized bacteria.[3] The entire process is powered by suction, similar to using a conventional drinking straw, and filters up to 700 liters of water.[4] The filter does not currently remove Giardia lamblia, but the company is working on this issue. [5]

Critical response

LifeStraw Personal has generally been praised for its effective and instant method of bacteria removal. The device also causes higher-than-normal iodine levels in the drinkers' water, although this is countered by the iodine deficiency problem that exists in the third world. Paul Hetherington, of the charity WaterAid, has criticised the LifeStraw Personal for being too expensive for the target market. He also points to other important problems linked with accessing the water in developing countries, which wait to be solved, but are not addressed by the device itself.[4]

LifeStraw Family however, aims at being a response to above mentioned criticisms, providing cheaper water (lower cost per purified liter) and removing the complete spectrum of microbiological contamination, including parasites like Giardia lamblia [6]. Although the rated filter size only goes to 15 microns, the EPA removal standards were exceeded even for Cryptosporidium (4-6 microns).

Competition

References

External links

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LifeStraw includes LifeStraw Personal and LifeStraw Family, which are complementary point-of-use water filters designed by the Swiss-based Vestergaard Frandsen for tourists and people living in developing nations. There are several models of the product: LifeStraw Personal filters a maxium of 700 litres of water, enough for one person for one year. LifeStraw Family filters a maximum of 18,000 litres of water, providing safe drinking water for a family for more than two years. It removes 99.9999% of waterborne bacteria, 99.99% of viruses, and 99.9% of parasites. LifeStraw Personal kills 99.9999% of waterborne bacteria and 98.5% of viruses.

Contents

Construction

The LifeStraw Personal is a plastic tube 31 centimeters long and 30 millimeters in diameter[1], and costs around $2.00 plus shipping[2]. Water that is sucked through the straw first passes through a mesh of 100-micrometer spaces, then through a mesh of 15-micrometer spaces. Water then passes through a chamber with iodine-coated beads, killing remaining bacteria. The water passes through an empty chamber, then finally passes through active carbon, removing the iodide taste and medium-sized bacteria.[3] The entire process is powered by suction, similar to using a conventional drinking straw, and filters up to 700 liters of water.[4] While the initial model of the filter did not remove Giardia lamblia [5], later models (starting—date/reference needed--) do remove a minimum of 99.9% of waterborne protozoan parasites including giardia and cryptosporidium [6].

Critical response

LifeStraw Personal has generally been praised for its effective and instant method of bacteria removal. The device also causes higher-than-normal iodine levels in the drinkers' water, although this is countered by the iodine deficiency problem that exists in the third world. Paul Hetherington, of the charity WaterAid, has criticised the LifeStraw Personal for being too expensive for the target market. He also points to other important problems linked with accessing the water in developing countries, which wait to be solved, but are not addressed by the device itself.[4]

LifeStraw Family however, aims at being a response to above mentioned criticisms, providing cheaper water (lower cost per purified liter) and removing the complete spectrum of microbiological contamination, including parasites like Giardia lamblia [7]. Although the rated filter size only goes to 15 microns, the EPA removal standards were exceeded even for Cryptosporidium (4-6 microns).

See also

References

  1. ^ WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future: Gil Friend: The LifeStraw
  2. ^ The LifeStraw makes dirty water clean
  3. ^ LifeStrawTM
  4. ^ a b New straw to kill disease as you drink
  5. ^ Water for the World, Newsweek, By Jennie Yabroff, 6/12/07.
  6. ^ [1], Vestergaard Frandsen: Does LifeStraw® remove parasites like cryptosporidium and giardia?
  7. ^ [2]

External links


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