Lindsey Hunter: Wikis

  
  
  

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Lindsey Hunter
Point guard
Born December 3, 1970 (1970-12-03) (age 39)
Utica, Mississippi, Mississippi
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Listed weight 195 lb (88 kg)
High school Murrah
College Jackson State
Draft 10th overall, 1993
Detroit Pistons
Pro career 1993–2010
Former teams Detroit Pistons (1993–2000, 2003–2008)
Milwaukee Bucks (2000–2001)
Los Angeles Lakers (2001–2002)
Toronto Raptors (2002–2003)
Chicago Bulls (2008–2010)
Awards 1993 NBA All Rookie 2nd Team
2-time NBA champion (2002 and 2004)

Lindsey Benson Hunter, Jr. (born December 3, 1970, in Utica, Mississippi) is a former American professional basketball player. He was a point guard in the NBA from 1993 to 2010. He is now a player development assistant for the Chicago Bulls.

Contents

Basketball career

After playing basketball at Murrah High School in Jackson, Mississippi, alongside phenom James Robinson, Hunter enrolled at Jackson State University. While playing for the Tigers, he became arguably the school's highest profile athlete since the days of Walter Payton and Jackie Slater.

The Detroit Pistons had two first-round picks in the 1993 NBA Draft. They selected Hunter with the 10th pick and chose Tennessee guard Allan Houston with the 11th. Hunter has spent most of his professional career playing with the Pistons organization. His first stint in Detroit lasted from 1993 to 2000 when he was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks for Billy Owens. He played with the Bucks for one season, before being sent to the Los Angeles Lakers in exchange for Greg Foster. Hunter was a contributor on the Lakers team that won the NBA championship in 2001–02.

Following that season, Hunter was dealt again (on draft night 2002), this time to the Toronto Raptors, along with the rights to Chris Jefferies, for Tracy Murray and Kareem Rush.[1] In August 2003, the Pistons re-acquired Hunter by sending Michael Curry to the Raptors.[2] He was traded to the Boston Celtics in February 2004 along with Chucky Atkins and Detroit's 2004 first-round draft pick for Mike James, in order to make the salary cap figures work out for the trade that brought Rasheed Wallace to the Pistons. Hunter never played a game for the Celtics; he was immediately released and re-signed by Detroit a week later.[3] Hunter and Pistons went on to win the 2003–04 NBA championship.

On March 7, 2007, Hunter was suspended for ten games after testing positive for phentermine. He claimed he was using his wife's diet pills, which made him test positive for the banned substance.[4]

Hunter signed a one-year nonguaranteed contract with the Chicago Bulls on November 13, 2008.[5] On July 13, 2009, Hunter re-signed with the Bulls for the veteran minimum of $1.3 million. He was waived in March 2010 to make room for Chris Richard, though the Bulls planned to keep him in the organization in some capacity.[6] Two days later, Hunter was hired by the Bulls as a player development assistant.[7][8]

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1993–94 Detroit 82 26 26.5 .375 .333 .732 2.3 4.8 1.5 .1 10.3
1994–95 Detroit 42 26 22.5 .374 .333 .727 1.8 3.8 1.2 .2 7.5
1995–96 Detroit 80 48 26.7 .381 .405 .700 2.4 2.4 1.0 .2 8.5
1996–97 Detroit 82 76 36.9 .404 .355 .778 2.8 1.9 1.6 .3 14.2
1997–98 Detroit 71 67 35.3 .383 .321 .740 3.5 3.2 1.7 .1 12.1
1998–99 Detroit 49 49 35.8 .435 .386 .753 3.4 3.9 1.8 .2 11.9
1999–00 Detroit 82 82 35.6 .425 .432 .760 3.0 4.0 1.6 .3 12.7
2000–01 Milwaukee 82 5 24.4 .381 .373 .802 2.1 2.7 1.2 .2 10.1
2001–02 L.A. Lakers 82 47 19.7 .382 .380 .500 1.5 1.6 .8 .2 5.8
2002–03 Toronto 29 0 23.2 .351 .318 .723 2.0 2.4 1.2 .2 9.7
2003–04 Detroit 33 8 20.0 .343 .280 .625 2.0 2.6 1.2 .2 3.5
2004–05 Detroit 76 3 15.1 .358 .274 .793 1.6 1.7 .9 .2 3.8
2005–06 Detroit 30 1 11.8 .370 .256 .500 1.3 2.1 .6 .0 2.9
2006–07 Detroit 52 0 14.3 .385 .319 .909 .9 1.8 .6 .1 4.9
2007–08 Detroit 24 0 9.0 .344 .269 .778 .5 1.4 .5 .1 2.4
2008–09 Chicago 28 0 9.5 .329 .333 .600 .4 1.3 .7 .0 2.6
2009–10 Chicago 13 0 9.4 .167 .077 1.000 1.1 .7 .1 .0 1.0
Career 937 439 24.8 .388 .360 .746 2.2 2.7 1.2 .2 8.5

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1995–96 Detroit 2 0 18.0 .250 .250 .500 1.0 .5 .5 .0 3.0
1996–97 Detroit 5 5 40.2 .439 .414 .714 3.6 1.2 1.2 .2 15.0
1998–99 Detroit 5 5 36.0 .264 .273 1.000 3.0 2.4 1.4 .0 7.2
1999–00 Detroit 3 3 31.0 .313 .111 .667 2.3 1.7 1.7 .3 8.3
2000–01 Milwaukee 18 0 16.1 .242 .151 .727 1.7 1.9 .8 .2 3.6
2001–02 L.A. Lakers 18 0 7.3 .311 .276 .000 .4 .6 .1 .0 2.0
2003–04 Detroit 23 0 11.9 .292 .233 .917 1.4 .9 .8 .2 2.4
2004–05 Detroit 25 0 15.0 .319 .222 .727 1.6 1.6 .9 .3 3.8
2005–06 Detroit 18 0 12.1 .333 .318 1.000 1.1 1.6 .8 .1 4.2
2006–07 Detroit 13 0 10.2 .226 .222 1.000 .8 1.2 .5 .1 1.8
2007–08 Detroit 11 0 10.5 .381 .455 .000 .9 1.3 .7 .0 1.9
2008–09 Chicago 6 0 4.0 .333 .333 .750 .8 .8 .3 .0 1.0
Career 147 13 14.1 .309 .260 .810 1.3 1.3 .7 .1 3.5

References

External links








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