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List of Enix Japan exclusive games: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The logo of Enix, which appears on the cover arts of the games published by the company.

This is a list of Japan-exclusive video games published by Enix.

Contents: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W Z


0–9

Ø Story (ラブストーリー Rabu Sutōrī ?) Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: April 20, 2000

A

Again (アゲイン Agein ?) Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: December 1984
  • An adventure game developed by Yuhei Yamaguchi and co-published by Enix and Random House[1]
  • One of the titles to win the third programming contest held by Enix[2]
Alphos (アルフォス Arufosu ?) Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: June 1983
Angelus: Akuma no Fukuin (アンジェラス~悪魔の福音 Anjierasu: Akuma no Fukuin ?) Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: July 1988
Animal Land Satsujin Jiken (アニマルランド殺人事件 Animaru Rando Satsujin Jiken ?) Platform(s): MSX Release date: 1987
Astronoka Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: August 27, 1998

B

Blade Arts: Tasogare no Miyako R'lyeh Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: September 28, 2000
Blue Fox Platform(s): FM-7 Release date: December 1984
Burning Point Platform(s): FM-7 Release date: February 1989

C

Checker Flag Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: October 1983
Code-Zero Platform(s): Sharp X68000 Release date: 1991
Command Master Platform(s): Game Boy Color Release date: November 22, 2000
Cosmic Soldier Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: February 1983

A shooter game in which the player controls an astronaut who must destroy hostile UFOs. The action is confined to a single, horizontal field viewed in profile. The player can move left and right, shoot in four directions, and hover in the void. Bullets are limited but additional supplies can be collected. Texts are in English.

Cosmo Crash Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: October 1983

D

Dance Summit 2001: Bust A Move Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: November 2, 2000
Dark Castle Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: July 1984
Dark Half Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: May 31, 1996
Depth Fantasia Platform(s): PC Release date: December 12, 2001

An online role-playing game for the PC.[6] The game servers were shut down in late 2005.[7]

Doki Doki Densetsu: Maoujin Guruguru Platform(s): Game Boy Color Release date: November 17, 2000
Dokuron no Kan Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: October 1983
Door Door Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: February 1983

A puzzle game. Texts are in English.

Dragon Buster Platform(s): Release date: August 1987
Dragon Quest Characters: Torneko no Daibōken 3 - Fushigi no Dungeon Platform(s): PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance Release date: October 31, 2002

The third game in the Torneko series. It is part of the Mystery Dungeon series and contains randomly generated dungeons and uses turn-based action combat. It is the third Dragon Quest spin-off game in the Mystery Dungeon series. The game was also made for the Game Boy Advance, called Dragon Quest Characters: Torneko no Daibōken 3 Advance - Fushigi no Dungeon, in 2004.

Dragon Quest Monsters: Caravan Heart Platform(s): Game Boy Advance Release date: March 29, 2003

The third game in the Dragon Quest Monsters series.[8] The game was simultaneously announced with Dragon Quest VIII in Famitsu in 2002.[9] Like the other Dragon Quest titles, development of Caravan Heart was led by Yuji Horii.[10]

The first Dragon Quest game to be released for the Game Boy Advance, Caravan Heart features the character Prince Keifer from Dragon Quest VII.Caravan Heart is known as the prequel to the PlayStation game, Dragon Quest VII. This is also the last Dragon Quest released under the Enix name, since the merger between Square and Enix was finalized a few days later, on April 1.

Dramatic Soccer Game: Nippon Daihyou Senshu Ninarou! Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: May 23, 2002
Dungeon Land Platform(s): Game Boy Release date: December 15, 1992

E

The Earth Fighter Rayieza Platform(s): Release date: January 1985
El Dorado Denki Platform(s): Release date: January 1985
Endonesia Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: May 31, 2001

A console role-playing game in which the player takes on the role of a 5th-grade boy who is accidentally warped to a fictional island called Endonesia. The protagonist must communicate with the island's 50 sealed gods in order to return home. The boy does so by obtaining several abilities called Emo powers, which draw on his emotions. The game features daytime cycles that occur in real time.[11]

Eurasia Express Satsujin Jiken Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: November 26, 2000

F

Falancse Platform(s): Release date: 1985
Fangs: The Saga of Wolf Blood Platform(s): Release date: November 29, 1991
Fan Fun Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: October 1983
The Fear Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: July 26, 2001
Fist of the North Star Platform(s): Release date: May 1986

A game based on the Fist of the North Star manga series.

Flip Flop Platform(s): Release date: 1984
Formula C.M.S. Platform(s): Release date: July 1990

G

Gandhara Platform(s): Release date: May 1987
Gekisen! Minamitaiheiyou Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: June 1983
Googootrops Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: January 28, 1999
Great Hits Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: October 29, 1998
Gumball Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: December 1984

The Japanese version of the game of the same name developed by Brøderbund.

H

High School Adventure Platform(s): Release date: 1984

I

Itadaki Street 2: Neon Sign wa Bara Iro ni Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: February 26, 1994

The sequel to Itadaki Street operates like a junior version of Super Okuman Chouja Game. Instead of the players making purchases and sales completely on their own, the game offers advice for important situations. There are many themes including modern, futuristic, and the map of the world. Players that are controlled by the game's artificial intelligence range from teenagers to senior citizens. The game requires Japanese literacy. Players can move from 1 to 9 squares and must allow collect symbols from playing cards in order to get money from the bank. Casino gambling is also available and it includes Bingo and slot machines.

Itadaki Street: Gorgeous King Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: September 23, 1998
Itadaki Street 3: Okumanchouja Nishiteageru! Kateikyoushi Tsuki! Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: December 22, 2002

J

Jesus: Kyōfu no Bio Monster Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: April 1987

A game first released on the as Jesus, and was later ported to the Famicom and MSX2 with the subtitle "Kyōfu no Bio Monster" appended. A sequel was released on the PC-9801. The game's name refers to a space station called Jesus, named after the Christian messiah Jesus, and the 'Bio-Monster', which is a mysterious lifeform encountered in the game.

Jesus 2 Platform(s): Release date: March 24, 1991

The sequel to Jesus: Kyōfu no Bio Monster.

Joshiryo Panic Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: June 1983
Joushou Mahjong Tenpai Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: September 29, 1995
Just Breed Platform(s): Famicom Release date: December 15, 1992

A console role-playing game. Although it is somewhat obscure and was overlooked due to its late release, it is notable for its long development and as one of the largest RPGs created for the Famicom.

Jyutei Senki Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: August 27, 1993

K

Kachipaka Platform(s): PC Windows Release date: May 19, 2000
Kaikan Phrase: Datenshi Kourin Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: February 24, 2000
Karakuri Ninpou Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: August 1984
Karuizawa Yūkai Annai Platform(s): Release date: May 1985

A game which was also ported to different mobile phone services starting in 2001.

Kazuo Morita's Shōgi Platform(s): Release date: August 1985

L

Light Flipper Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: June 1983
Lolita Syndrome Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: October 1983
Lovely Asuka Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: 1983

M

Magic Garden Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: September 1984
Magic Knight Rayearth Platform(s): Release date: 1985

A game based on the Magic Knight Rayearth manga series.

MaildeQuest Platform(s): Release date:
Mahōjin Guru Guru Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: April 21, 1995

A game based on the Mahōjin Guru Guru manga series.

Mahōjin Guru Guru 2 Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: April 12, 1996

The sequel to Mahōjin Guru Guru.

Mari-chan Kikiippatsu Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: June 1983
Morita no Battle Field Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: February 1983

A turn-based strategy wargame in which the player commands units on a rectangular grid and must conquer other countries. The game features only one map. Kazuo Morita was not entirely satisfied with his work but had to send it to Enix regardless to meet his deadlines.

Misty Blue Platform(s): Release date: April 2, 1990
Mystic Ark Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: July 14, 1995

The sequel to The 7th Saga.

Mystic Ark: Maboroshi Gekijō Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: March 18, 1999

N

Nanatsu Kaze no Shima Monogatari Platform(s): Sega Saturn Release date: November 27, 1997

An interactive storybook developed by Givro, Crowd, and other parties.[12]

Nekketsu Tairiku Burning Heroes Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: March 17, 1995
Newtron Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: May 1984
Nihondaihyou Chiimu no Kantoku Ninarou! Platform(s): Sega Saturn Release date: June 25, 1998
Nin Pen Man Maru Platform(s): Sega Saturn Release date: December 18, 1997

O

The Old Village Story Platform(s): Release date: December 1988
Omiai Commando: Bakappuru Nitsukkomiwo Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: March 30, 2000
Orega Kantoku Da! Gekitou Pennant Race Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: November 22, 2000
Orega Kantoku Da! Volume 2 Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: March 7, 2002

P

Parallel World Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: May 1984
Plane 4989 Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: December 1984
Planet Laika Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: October 21, 1999
Pop'n Tanks! Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: July 29, 1999
Portopia Renzoku Satsujin Jiken Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: June 1983

An adventure game designed by Yuuji Horii and programmed by Koichi Nakamura. It was ported to several personal computers, and ported by Chunsoft to the Famicom on November 29, 1985. It was also released on different mobile phone services starting in 2001.

The game is a basic investigation adventure in which the player must resolve the mystery of a murder by searching for clues, interacting with characters, and solving item-based puzzles. The game, especially its Famicom version, was received positively by players in Japan. An unofficial English fan translation of the Famicom version was released on June 16, 2006 by DvD Translations.[13]

Prajator: Image Ranger Platform(s): Release date: December 1989
PushMan Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: February 1984

R

Rakugaki Showtime Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: July 29, 1999

S

Samurai Evolution: Oukoku Geist Platform(s): Game Boy Advance Release date: September 20, 2002
Savior Platform(s): Release date:
Seiko's Adventure Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: February 1983

A short adventure game set in a spacecraft.

Segare Ijiri Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: June 3, 1999
Shuten Dōji Platform(s): Release date: September 1990
Snap Kids Platform(s): Game Boy Advance Release date: January 17, 2002
Star Ocean Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: July 19, 1996

The first of the Star Ocean video game series. It was the first game developed by tri-Ace. It was never released outside of Japan due to the closing of Enix's American division, Enix America Corporation. Star Ocean features emotional levels between characters, a real-time battle system, a Star Trekkish story, and in-battle voices.

The game was made by disenchanted developers who had just made Tales of Phantasia for Namco, and many of its features were in Tales of Phantasia as well. They left due to creative disputes, and Star Ocean features many similar ideas. The two games also stretched the power of the Super Famicom to its limits, with a total of 48 Megabits of data (the most that could be stored in a cartridge.) Star Ocean also used an S-DD1 chip to aid in compression of almost all graphics and map data, meaning that it effectively stored even more data than Tales of Phantasia. In the "Virtual Reality Sound System," the "Flexible Voice Driver" was again used to overcome the 64kb limit of the SPC700 chip by swapping bits of vocal samples, and a surround-sound feature was added; there were even more voices than in Tales of Phantasia (although they had to be stored at lower quality to fit within the cartridge limits.)

Star Ocean was scored by Motoi Sakuraba. Yoshiharu Gotanda wrote the story that it is based on. A PlayStation Portable enhanced remake was recently announced prior to the 2007 Square Enix Party event.

Star Ocean: Blue Sphere Platform(s): Game Boy Color Release date: June 28, 2001

The sequel to Star Ocean: The Second Story. The text is colloquial with an emphasis on "sci-fi" jargon.

Super Galdelic Hour Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: March 29, 2001
Suzuki Bakuhatsu Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: July 6, 2000

T

Ten Made Jack: Odorokimamenoki Dai Tou Bou!! Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: March 23, 2000
Tokyo Nampa Street Platform(s): Release date: April 1985
Tropical Boy Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: October 1983
Typing Exercise Platform(s): Release date: February 1985

U

Underground Monster Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: February 1983
Utautau: Seirei Songs Platform(s): PlayStation Release date: February 24, 2000

V

Violinist of Hameln Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: September 29, 1995

A game based on the Violinist of Hameln manga series.

W

Wingman Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: November 1984

A game based on the Wingman manga series.

Wingman 2: Kitakura's Revival Platform(s): Release date: April 1986

The sequel to Wingman.

Wingman Special Platform(s): Release date: December 1987

The sequel to Wingman 2.

Wonder Project J: Kikai no Shōnen Pīno Platform(s): Super Famicom Release date: December 9, 1994

A raising simulation in which the player raises a Pinocchio-esque boy, whose default name is "Pino", to succeed in various challenges and confrontations to activate virtue circuits, with his final task to foster relations between humans and the robot-like Gijin.

Wonder Project J2: Koruro no Mori no Josette Platform(s): Nintendo 64 Release date: November 22, 1996
World Golf Platform(s): Release date: July 1985
World Golf 2 Platform(s): Release date: October 1987
World Golf 3 Platform(s): Release date: October 1990

Z

Zarth Platform(s): NEC PC-8801 Release date: August 1984
Zasu Platform(s): Release date: 1985
Zaxus Platform(s): Release date: March 1985
Zoku Segare Ijiri Platform(s): PlayStation 2 Release date: June 27, 2002

References

  1. ^ Y. Romi. "アゲイン" (in Japanese). PC88ゲームライブラリ. http://refugee2005.sakura.ne.jp/library/1984/1984_12.htm#again. Retrieved 2008-06-02.  
  2. ^ "Enix Game History" (in Japanese). Enix. Archived from the original on 2000-06-22. http://web.archive.org/web/20000622145446/www.enix.co.jp/news/game/ghistoryJ.html. Retrieved 2008-06-02.  
  3. ^ Y. Romi. "アルフォス" (in Japanese). PC88ゲームライブラリ. http://refugee2005.sakura.ne.jp/library/1983/1983_6.htm#alphos. Retrieved 2008-06-02.  
  4. ^ Y. Romi. "アンジェラス" (in Japanese). PC88ゲームライブラリ. http://refugee2005.sakura.ne.jp/library/1988/1988_7.htm#angelus. Retrieved 2008-06-02.  
  5. ^ a b "Angelus ~The Gospel on Evil~". Chudah's Corner. http://www.chudahs-corner.com/soundtracks/index.php?catalog=BY30-5205. Retrieved 2008-06-02.  
  6. ^ Parry-Cruwys, Robert (August 28, 2001). "Enix Announces New Online RPG". RPGamer.com. http://www.rpgamer.com/news/Q3-2001/082801b.html. Retrieved 2008-07-29.  
  7. ^ Winkler, Chris (July 13, 2005). "Square Enix To Cancel Depth Fantasia". RPGFan.com. http://rpgfan.com/news/2005/1661.html. Retrieved 2008-10-29.  
  8. ^ Cortney Stone (2003). "Dragon Quest Monsters III: Caravan Heart Details Roll Out". http://www.rpgamer.com/news/Q1-2003/032103a.html. Retrieved October 4, 2007.  
  9. ^ Anoop Gantayat (2002). "Dragon Quest Goes GBA". http://gameboy.ign.com/articles/378/378989p1.html. Retrieved October 6, 2007.  
  10. ^ Cortney Stone (2002). "Enix Sheds Some Light on Upcoming Dragon Quest Title". http://www.rpgamer.com/news/Q4-2002/121602c.html. Retrieved October 4, 2007.  
  11. ^ Long, Andrew (March 20, 2001). "Enix Reveals Endoneshia Information". RPGamer.com. http://www.rpgamer.com/news/Q1-2001/032001c.html. Retrieved 2008-07-29.  
  12. ^ de Figueiredo, Bruno. "Hardcore Gaming 101: Nanatsu Kaze No Shima Monogatari". GameSpy.com. http://hg101.classicgaming.gamespy.com/nanatsukaze/nanatsukaze.htm. Retrieved 2009-06-22.  
  13. ^ Jacobi, Scott (October 2006), "Nintendo Realm - November to December 1985", Retrogaming Times Monthly (29), http://my.stratos.net/~hewston95/RTM29/RTM29.html, retrieved 2007-08-16  .
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