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List of James Bond henchmen in Live and Let Die: Wikis

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A list of henchman from the 1954 James Bond novel and 1973 film Live and Let Die from the List of James Bond henchmen.

Contents

Tee Hee Johnson

Tee Hee Johnson
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mr. Big
Portrayed by Julius Harris

Tee Hee Johnson is a fictional character in the James Bond novel and film Live and Let Die. In the film he was portrayed by Julius Harris. Tee Hee's name is derived from his tendency to chuckle and snicker to himself very often for little or no reason. As Bond states when he first meets the man: "Funny how the least little thing amuses him."

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Film

In the film, Tee Hee works for Mr. Big and has a metal arm, replacing one which was bitten off by a crocodile named Albert. He appears to be either a chief bodyguard or right hand man of Kananga, as he appears in almost all of his employer's scenes regardless of which identity his employer is currently assuming. In his first meeting of Bond at a Fillet of Soul restaurant in Harlem, New York City, Tee Hee is informed that Bond is armed by Solitaire, disarms him and, in a demonstration of his formidable hook, bends Bond's gun nearly double. Later on San Monique, he calls to inform his boss's subordinates that 007 and Solitaire have been found on the island. In the French Quarter in New Orleans Tee Hee is present in Mr. Big's private office below another Fillet of Soul and offers Bond a chair rigged with handcuffs on the armrests to sit down in and activates the mechanism. When James Bond is questioned about the state of Solitaire's virginity, Tee Hee threatens to snip off 007's right little finger and then knocks the secret agent out so that he can be taken to Kananga's crocodile farm where he would intended to be eaten. In their next meeting when Bond awakens at the farm, Tee Hee gives 007 a tour of Dr. Kananga's heroin processing lab and, macabre information about the crocodiles as well. He then strands Bond on a tiny island surrounded by crocodiles and alligators, but Bond escapes by using the backs of the alligators as stepping stones. Bond then sets fire to the laboratory Tee Hee was overseeing. As Bond escapes in a speedboat, Tee Hee orders fellow henchman Adam to go after 007 by car. After Bond foils Mr. Big's plot, Tee Hee returns to attempt revenge. The metal-armed man sneaks aboard a train on which Bond and Solitaire are traveling on and kills the electricity to the pair's cabin. During a fight with Tee Hee, Bond disables his artificial arm by cutting the wires which control the hook with nail clippers. Bond then throws Tee Hee out of the window of a moving train, leaving his metal arm still attached to the window ledge.

Novel

In the novel, Tee Hee is an African-American gangster with two normal human arms and normal human abilities. He is killed early in the story when Bond kicks him over a railing and he falls down a stairwell. Tee Hee had previously broken the little finger of Bond's left hand on Mr. Big's orders -- giggling as he did so -- after Bond was captured in Mr. Big's Harlem nightclub.

Baron Samedi

Baron Samedi
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mr. Big
Portrayed by Geoffrey Holder

Baron Samedi is a fictional character from the James Bond novel and film, Live and Let Die. In the film, he was a henchman to Mr. Big. In Live and Let Die, Samedi was portrayed by actor Geoffrey Holder. Samedi would later make appearances in the video game GoldenEye 007 for the Nintendo 64 as a villain, and as a multiplayer character.

The character is inspired from the loa, Baron Samedi, a figure representative of death in the Voodoo religion.

Novel

In the novel, Baron Samedi does not make an appearance himself, although many people in Harlem and elsewhere believe the novel's chief villain, Mr. Big, to be either the Voodoo god Baron Samedi himself or perhaps his zombie. Mr. Big encourages this belief by keeping a Baron Samedi totem near his desk.

Film

Baron Samedi is first introduced as an entertainer who does a voodoo dance act for tourists at a hotel restaurant, when Bond arrives at the island on which most of the action takes place. The announcer introduces Samedi as "the man who cannot die", though Bond doesn't seem to think much of it at the time. He is coyly described by Felix Leiter as being nine feet tall, and holding a cockamame [flute]]. Holder is 6'6" in reality. Holder at the time was featured in TV commercials for Seven-Up, explaining the difference between cola nuts and "uncola nuts (a lemon and a lime)". The punch line of the first ad was: "Try making that out of a cola nut", ending with the same infectious guffaw of a laugh Holder was to bring with him into the Baron Samedi role.

Baron Samedi is perhaps the most enigmatic villain/henchman the cinematic Bond has ever faced. He is the only henchman that uses occultic acts to kill his enemies. His character is an ambiguous one, and the audience cannot tell if he is the Voodoo god Baron Samedi himself or simply a human who has assumed Samedi's identity. Contributing to the mystery is the fact that Samedi seems to operate as an aide to Doctor Kananga, aka Mr. Big, but is not entirely under his control. In one scene, for instance, as Kananga interrogates Solitaire (the film's main Bond girl), Samedi engages in an odd ritual of burning Tarot cards. The ritual seems to convey a sinister message to Kananga and Solitaire, and although it irritates Kananga, he refuses to put a stop to Samedi's card-burning. Furthermore, the scene demonstrates that he has, perhaps, the same Tarot powers as Solitaire. When Bond and Solitaire are exploring Kananga's "Voodooland", he is the first of the villain's allies to observe the pair and reports this on a flute he is playing after a menacing and polite interaction with them. Solitaire appears to acknowledge him as they walk away. This flute is actually a walkie-talkie, which he reports Bond and Solitaire's movements to Tee Hee.

Later on, Bond witnesses Baron Samedi rising from a grave, and shoots him in the forehead; however, it is revealed to be nothing more than an animatronic dummy. Only minutes later, however, the real Samedi rises from the grave and engages Bond in a machete fight. Bond kills him again by pushing him into a coffin full of snakes. But just before the end credits roll, when Bond typically has achieved total victory in previous films, Samedi is seen riding on the front of Bond and Solitaire's speeding train laughing demoniacally, further suggesting that he is in fact a supernatural character, a first (and so far only) for the Bond films.

Samedi has never reappeared in any subsequent Bond film, unlike the henchman Jaws or the villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld, but neither has the series endeavoured to solve the mystery of Samedi's nature.

Video games

In the video game, GoldenEye 007, Samedi appears as a boss in an unlockable mission separate from the main plot. In the game, Bond is sent to the ancient el-Saghira temple in the Valley of the Kings in response to a letter sent by someone claiming to be Baron Samedi. Additionally, Samedi claims to have possession of Francisco Scaramanga's golden gun (from The Man with the Golden Gun). Bond is sent to retrieve the legendary weapon and defeat a cackling Baron a total of three times before completing the mission. (Interestingly enough, though the Golden Gun defeats other enemies in one shot, it takes more than one shot to dispatch the Baron's last incarnation.) Also, Samedi further juxtaposes the Bond films by attacking Bond with a Moonraker laser pistol in his final attempt. He also appears to have an army of Russian Infantry at his disposal, as they are the guards in this level. In the cutscene that follows, Bond confidently strides down a corridor of the temple with the Golden Gun in hand, sure that all the villains have been eliminated. After he leaves, Samedi emerges from the shadows and laughs. However, a glitch in the game allows the player to kill him a fourth time. He is also available as a multiplayer character.

Baron Samedi makes an appearance in the second stage of the 1992 Sega Mega Drive/Genesis game James Bond: The Duel. He is found about halfway through the stage and takes several shots to destroy, he then reappears from the ground but does not return after being killed a second time.

Samedi is also an unlockable multiplayer character in James Bond 007: Nightfire (unlocked either by use of cheat codes or completing the campaign mission "The Exchange" with a high enough medal), James Bond 007: Everything or Nothing, (earning 50 points in Co-Op multiplayer mode) and The World Is Not Enough (cheat codes or successfully completing the game on the "Secret Agent" difficulty setting).

Rosie Carver

Rosie Carver
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Renegade CIA Agent, Mr. Big / Kananga
Portrayed by Gloria Hendry

Rosie Carver, played by Gloria Hendry, is a fictional character in the James Bond film Live and Let Die. Her character was created for the film, and does not appear in the novel.

In the film, she is a rogue CIA agent who is secretly an underling of Kananga, aka "Mr. Big", who sends her to kill 007. When arriving at a hotel in San Monique, Bond is surprised to learn that "Mrs. Bond" has already booked into the suite.

After spending the night together, Bond and Rosie head off deep-sea fishing, while they check over the rest of the island. After a picnic where they make love, Bond confronts Rosie, and learns that she is actually in the employ of Kananga and she is to lure Bond to a trap where he would be killed. When Bond threatens to kill her if she doesn't come clean, Rosie runs away in terror, only to be killed moments later by a poisonous dart shot from one of Kananga’s scarecrows. She is one of many henchmen who is killed not by James but by their employer (other examples include Henry Gupta from Tomorrow Never Dies, Truman-Lodge and Milton Krest from License to Kill, Kronsteen from From Russia with Love, Quist from Thunderball, Helga Brandt (Number 11) and Osato from You Only Live Twice).

Rosie Carver is Bond's first on-screen black love interest. Her character was initially written as a white woman and the lead Bond girl, Solitaire, as black (Diana Ross being the first choice to play Solitaire) before the producers made the switch. During filming, the producers actually thought about sparing Rosie, but ultimately they went ahead with the original plan and killed her off.


Whisper

Whisper
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mr. Big / Kananga
Portrayed by Earl Jolly Brown

Whisper is the name of a character in the Bond novel and film, Live and Let Die. The character is a burly man with a soft voice that sounds like he is whispering, hence earning himself the nickname. His true name is never revealed. In the film he is played by Earl Jolly Brown.

In the novel, his quiet voice is attributed to a childhood bout of tuberculosis, from which one and a half of his lungs had to be surgically removed, leaving him with only half a lung with which to breathe and talk. He is in charge of a telephone switchboard, at which he can receive orders from Mr. Big and pass them on to other operatives as needed. Whisper is arrested in the end of the novel.

He is seen on a number of occasions throughout the film; when Bond travels to meet Felix Leiter in New York, when he pulls alongside Bond's cab, he kills Bond's chauffeur by using a poison dart in his car, attempting to kill Bond as well by causing a car accident. Later, he is seen bringing a bottle of champagne to Bond in his hotel bungalow on the island of San Monique. Rosie Carver then alerts Bond that Whisper is not on the hotel payroll and should be viewed with caution. He appears at the end of the film in Kananga's lair.

It is unclear as to whether Whisper actually dies at the close of the movie. He is last seen sitting on a black leather couch which is inflated by Kananga shooting it with a Co2 cartridge, thus exploding the couch and when Bond escapes the platform that was being lowered into a pool of sharks, he kicks Whisper into an air tight metal drug shipment capsule while trying to warn Kananga of the incident. However, it is strongly suggested given Whisper's condition that he dies from asphyxiation, as the capsule did not have much breathable oxygen, and his quiet voice did not enable him to shout loudly for help.


Adam

Adam
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mr. Big / Kananga
Portrayed by Tommy Lane

Adam is a character in the Bond film, Live and Let Die. He is an underling of Kananga/Mr. Big but mainly receives his instructions from Tee Hee; in some ways he can be considered the latter's (non-mechanical) right hand. He first appears at the airport where Bond and Solitaire are captured and then leads Mr. Big's men in pursuing Bond at the alligator farm. He steals a speedboat from Sheriff J. W. Pepper's brother-in-law Billy Bob to chase Bond and, at the climax of the chase near an abandoned LST, is doused in petrol by Bond. Disoriented by this attack, he maneuvers his boat inside the landing ship and is killed in the subsequent explosion.

Dambala

Dambala
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mr. Big / Kananga
Portrayed by Michael Ebbin

Dambala is a character in the Bond film, Live and Let Die. He is portrayed by Michael Ebbin.

Dambala is a voodoo priest of sorts who appears to be a disciple of Baron Samedi. He is first seen during the pre-credits sequence, in which he kills a British agent named Baines with a venomous snake on San Monique, the third killing within days linked to Dr. Kananga. He later shows up when Bond comes to the island, and he is shot by Bond during the agent's attempts to find the entrance to Kananga's lair.

Oh Cult Voodoo Shop Clerk

Oh Cult Voodoo Shop Clerk
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mister Big
Portrayed by Kubi Chaza

Oh Cult Voodoo Shop Clerk, played by Kubi Chaza, is a fictional character in the James Bond film Live and Let Die.

This woman is one of the people Bond meets in New York City while following the trail of assassinations there. Though she seems like a demure occult shop owner, she is actually in cahoots with Dr. Kananga. After Bond finds evidence in New York City that leads him to Mister Big in Harlem, the clerk puts in a call to Big's henchmen to follow him there. She is later seen in New Orleans wearing the uniform of a stewardess when Mister Big's henchmen have captured Bond and intended to send him "skydiving", an obvious reference to a death flight.

Cab Driver

Cab Driver
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Mr. Big / Kananga
Portrayed by Arnold Williams

Cab Driver is a character in the James Bond film, Live and Let Die. He is played by Arnold Williams.

The Cab Driver is the driver who helps Bond to tail Solitaire and Kananga's men to Kananga's Fillet of Soul restaurant in New York City. He is overly cheerful and likes to mess with his passengers' minds. After Bond departs into the Fillet of Soul, the Cab Driver is revealed to be a Kananga agent, who informs the restaurant crew about Bond's arrival. Bond is later captured but soon escapes.

After Bond and Solitaire arrive in New Orleans from San Monique, they are driven around town by the same Cab Driver, who traps them in his car and drives them to Kananga's men at a nearby airfield. He comments that New Orleans "sure beats the Hell out of Harlem", and asks "How's it going, Jim?", making the Cab Driver one of the few Bond adversaries to refer to Bond by a nickname rather than his proper name of James. He then amusingly informs Bond that they intend to send him "skydiving". Bond once again escapes and the Cab Driver is not seen again.


Casual Assassin

Unknown (Casual Assassin)
Character from the James Bond franchise
Affiliation Dr. Kananga/Mr. Big

The Casual Assassin is a minor character in the James Bond film Live and Let Die. He is portrayed by Alvin Alcorn in an uncredited role.

During the film's pre-title sequence, MI6 agent Hamilton is seen observing the Fillet of Soul restaurant in New Orleans. Suddenly, a sorrowful funeral parade appears on the same street, with the Casual Assassin approaching Hamilton's side. He is a short, African-American man with glasses and gray hair, and is largely unassuming.

When Hamilton asks, "Whose funeral is it?", the casual assassin pulls out a switchblade knife and answers, "Yours," before quickly stabbing Hamilton to death. The fraudulent funeral-goers lower the coffin over Hamilton's body, and when they lift it (and the body) they erupt into jubilant celebration.

After Bond and his friend CIA agent Felix Leiter arrive in New Orleans, Felix sends Agent Harold Strutter to observe the Fillet of Soul at the exact spot where Hamilton was murdered. The same funeral parade appears and the casual assassin shows up again. He grins suspiciously at Strutter, and the scene cuts to Bond and Felix arriving at the restaurant as the once again jubilant funeral march passes them. Strutter is missing. They later go into the restaurant and order drinks. Leiter leaves to take a phone call allegedly from Strutter. Felix then says, "For a moment, I thought Harry was lying down on the job." It is unknown what the assassin's status is after Kananga's demise.


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