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List of Mississippian sites: Wikis

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This is a list of Mississippian sites. The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 CE to 1500 CE, varying regionally.[1]

Site Image Description
Angel Mounds Angel Mounds A chiefdom in southern Indiana near Evansville.
Ashworth Archaeological Site File:No image available An archaeological site of the Caborn-Welborn variant of the Mississippian culture.
Aztalan State Park Aztalan State Park A small Mississippian chiefdom in Wisconsin, the northern edge of the greater Mississippian culture
Bussell Island File:No image available An island at the mouth of the Little Tennessee River in Loudon County, Tennessee, believed to have been the location "Coste," visited by de Soto in 1540
Cahokia Cahokia Near East St. Louis, Illinois, Cahokia was possibly the first, and certainly the largest and most influential of the Mississippian mound centers
Cheskiki Mound site Cheskiki Mound site In Castalian Springs, Tennessee, the site was once home to a substantial Mississippian-period (1000-1400 CE) village with 12 known mounds at the site
Campbell Archeological Site File:No image available The Campbell Archeological Site ( 23 PM 5), is a site in Southeastern Missouri occupied by the Late Mississippian Period Nodena Phase from 1350 to 1541 CE.
Chucalissa Indian Village File:Not available The site is a Walls Phase Mississippian site dating back to the 15th century, located in the city of Memphis in West Tennessee and was occupied, abandoned and reoccupied several times throughout its history, spanning from 1000 to 1550 CE.
Cloverdale archaeological site File:No image available An important archaeological site near St. Joseph, Missouri. It is located at the mouth of a small valley that opens into the Missouri River. It was occupied by Kansas City Hopewell (ca. 100 to 500 CE) peoples and later by Mississippian influenced Steed-Kisker peoples(ca. 1200 CE). Because of the many Cahokia style projectile points found at the site, it is believed to have been a trade partner or outpost of the much larger Cahokia polity.[1]
Dickson Mounds Dickson Mounds A settlement site and burial mound complex near Lewistown, Illinois in Fulton County on a low bluff overlooking the Illinois River. The site is named in honor of chiropractor Don Dickson, who began excavating it in 1927 and opened a private museum that formerly operated on the site.[2]
Eaker Site Eaker Site The site is the largest and most intact Late Mississippian Nodena Phase village site within the Central Mississippi Valley.[3]
Emerald Mound Site Emerald Mound Site A Plaquemine Mississippian period archaeological site located on the Natchez Trace Parkway near Stanton, Mississippi. The site dates from the period between 1200 and 1730 CE. The platform mound is the second-largest Pre-Columbian earthwork in the country, after Monk's Mound at Cahokia
Etowah Indian Mounds Etowah Indian Mounds One of the major Mississippian chiefdoms, located in Georgia, believed by some to be a long-standing antagonist of the Moundville polity.
Fort Walton Mound Fort Walton Mound The Fort Walton Mound was built about 1300 CE by Fort Walton Culture. Located in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, near the intersection of State Road 85 and U.S. Route 98, in the Florida Panhandle.
Grand Village of the Natchez Grand Village of the Natchez The main village of the Natchez people, with three mounds. The only mound site to be used and maintained into historic times
Holly Bluff Site Holly Bluff Site Type site for the Lake George phase of the Plaquemine culture, on the southern margin of the Mississippian cultural advance down the Mississippi River and on the northern edge of the Cole's Creek and Plaquemine cultures of the South
Hovey Lake-Klein Archeological Site File:No image available A Caborn-Welborn site, located on the west bank of Hovey Lake, a backwater lake near the Ohio River close to its confluence with the Wabash River. The site was an extensive village occupation dating between 1400-1650 CE.
Joara Joara The largest chiefdom in North Carolina at contact; also possibly the furthest northeastern Mississippian chiefdom center, near Morganton
Kincaid Mounds State Historic Site Kincaid Mounds State Historic Site A major Mississippian mound center in southern Illinois across the Ohio River from Paducah, Kentucky.
Letchworth Mounds Letchworth Mounds A Fort Walton Culture Florida State Park located approximately six miles west of Monticello, a half mile south of U.S. 90, in northwestern Florida. It contains the state's tallest Native American ceremonial mound (46 feet), estimated to have been built 1100 to 1800 years ago.
Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park Mound 2 at Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park The site is one of the most important sites in Florida, a former chiefdom and ceremonial center of the Fort Walton Culture. The complex originally included six earthwork mounds, a constructed plaza and numerous individual village residences. Located in the Florida Panhandle, it is in northern Tallahassee, on the south shore of Lake Jackson.
Menard-Hodges Site File:No image available In Arkansas, it includes two large mounds as well as several house mounds, possibly the Province of Anilco encountered by the Hernando de Soto Entrada in 1540.[4]
Mitchell Archaeological Site File:No image available A site in Davison County, South Dakota, near Mitchell, South Dakota. Mitchell Site is the only reliably dated site (c. 1000) pertaining to the Lower James River Phase (Initial Variant) of the migration of late Mississippian culture to the Middle Missouri Valley. It is distinctive for its evidence relating mortuary practices to other intra-site practices.
Mound Bottom Mound Bottom The complex in Cheatham County, Tennessee consists of ceremonial and burial mounds, a central plaza, and habitation areas, built between 950 and 1300 CE
Moundville Archaeological Site Moundville Archaeological Site Ranked with Cahokia as one of the two most important sites at the core of the classic Mississippian culture[5], located near Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
Murphy Mound Archeological Site File:No image available The Murphy Mound Archeological Site ( 23-PM-43 ), is an archaeological site in Southeastern Missouri occupied from 1350 to 1541 CE.
Nacoochee Mound File:No image available An earthen mound on the banks of the Chattahoochee River in White County, in the northeast part of the U.S. state of Georgia, at the junction of Georgia Highways 17 and 75.
Nodena Site Nodena Site Nodena is the type site for a Late Mississippian Nodena Phase, which dates from about 1400-1700 CE, believed by many archaeologists to be the province of Pacaha visited by Hernando de Soto in 1542.[6]
Ocmulgee National Monument Ocmulgee National Monument A Mississippian chiefdom, the site was used by the Creek Indians into historic times
Parkin Archeological State Park Parkin Archeological State Park The type site for the Late Mississippian Parkin Phase, believed by many archaeologists to be the province of Casqui visited by Hernando de Soto in 1542.[7]
Sellars Indian Mound Sellars Indian Mound A single mound site located near Lebanon, Tennessee from about 1000 CE until 1300 CE
Shiloh Indian Mounds Site Shiloh Indian Mounds Site The Shiloh battlefield has within its boundaries the well preserved prehistoric Shiloh Indian Mounds Site, which is a National Historic Landmark. The site was inhabited by a late Woodland or early Mississippian culture until it was abandoned sometime in the period from 1200 to 1300 CE.
Slack Farm File:No image available Slack Farm is a site of the Caborn-Welborn culture(a Late Mississippian variant) located near Uniontown, Kentucky close to the confluence of the Ohio River and the Wabash River. The site included a mound and an extensive village occupation dating between 1400-1650 CE.
Spiro Mounds Spiro Mounds One of the best-studied archaeological centers of Mississippian culture; located in eastern Oklahoma
Towosahgy State Historic Site Towosahgy State Historic Site A Mississippian chiefdom in southeastern Missouri
Town Creek Indian Mound Town Creek Indian Mound A Mississippian chiefdom in North Carolina, generally attributed to the historic Pee Dee (tribe)
Welborn Village Archeological Site File:No image available Also known as the Murphy's Landing Site, this site is an archaeological site of the Caborn-Welborn variant of the Mississippian culture.
Wickliffe mounds Wickliffe mounds A chiefdom on a bluff top in the far western Kentucky town of Wickliffe
Winterville Site Winterville Site The type site for the Winterville phase of the Plaquemine Mississippian culture.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Cloverdale Archaeological Site". http://users.stlcc.edu/mfuller/cloverdale/. Retrieved 2009-10-09.  
  2. ^ "History". State of Illinois. http://www.museum.state.il.us/ismsites/dickson/history.htm/. Retrieved 2009-10-21.  
  3. ^ "National Historic Landmarks Program-Eaker Site". http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=2106&ResourceType=Site.  
  4. ^ Hudson, Charles M. (1997). Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun. University of Georgia Press. p. Pp. 337.  
  5. ^ ""Southeastern Prehistory: Mississippian and Late Prehistoric Period"". "National Park Service". http://www.nps.gov/history/seac/outline/05-mississippian/index.htm. Retrieved 2007-12-04.  
  6. ^ Hudson, Charles M. (1997). Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun. University of Georgia Press.  
  7. ^ Hudson, Charles M. (1997). Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun. University of Georgia Press.  

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