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Counties of Ohio

This is a list of the eighty-eight counties in the U.S. state of Ohio. The Ohio Constitution allows counties to set up a charter government as many cities and villages do, but only Summit County has done so. Counties do not possess home rule powers and can do only what has been expressly authorized by the Ohio General Assembly. Ohio law defines a structure for county government, although each county may choose to define its own. Summit County has chosen an alternate structure, while all of the other counties use the default structure. The elected county officials include a sheriff (the highest law enforcement officer in the county); prosecutor (equivalent of a district attorney in other states); coroner, engineer, auditor, treasurer and clerk of courts.

The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code, which is used by the United States government to identify states and counties uniquely, is provided with each entry.[1] Ohio's code is 39, which when combined with any county code would be written as 39XXX. The FIPS code for each county links to census data for that county.

List of counties

County
FIPS Code
[2]
County Seat
[3]
Created
[3][4]
Origin
[5]
Etymology
[4][5]
Population
[2][3]
Area
[3]
Map
 
Adams County 001 West Union July 10, 1797 Hamilton County John Adams (1735-1826), President when the county was organized &0000000000027330.00000027,330 &0000000000000583.910000583.91 sq mi
(&0000000000001512.0000001,512 km²)
State map highlighting Adams County
Allen County 003 Lima March 1, 1820 Shelby County John Allen (1771/2-1813), a War of 1812 officer[6] &0000000000108473.000000108,473 &0000000000000404.430000404.43 sq mi
(&0000000000001047.0000001,047 km²)
State map highlighting Allen County
Ashland County 005 Ashland February 24, 1846 Wayne, Richland, Huron, and Lorain Counties Ashland, home of Henry Clay and county seat. &0000000000052523.00000052,523 &0000000000000424.370000424.37 sq mi
(&0000000000001099.0000001,099 km²)
State map highlighting Ashland County
Ashtabula County 007 Jefferson June 7, 1807 Trumbull and Geauga Counties Ashtabula River, which means "fish river" in an Algonquian language[7] &0000000000102728.000000102,728 &0000000000000702.440000702.44 sq mi
(&0000000000001819.0000001,819 km²)
State map highlighting Ashtabula County
Athens County 009 Athens March 1, 1805 Washington County Athens, Greece &0000000000062223.00000062,223 &0000000000000506.760000506.76 sq mi
(&0000000000001313.0000001,313 km²)
State map highlighting Athens County
Auglaize County 011 Wapakoneta February 14, 1848 Allen, Mercer, Darke, Hardin, Logan, Shelby, and Van Wert Counties Auglaize River, which means "fallen timbers river" to the Shawnee &0000000000046611.00000046,611 &0000000000000401.250000401.25 sq mi
(&0000000000001039.0000001,039 km²)
State map highlighting Auglaize County
Belmont County 013 St. Clairsville September 7, 1801 Jefferson and Washington Counties Belle monte, which means "beautiful mountain" in French &0000000000070226.00000070,226 &0000000000000537.350000537.35 sq mi
(&0000000000001392.0000001,392 km²)
State map highlighting Belmont County
Brown County 015 Georgetown March 1, 1818 Adams and Clermont Counties General Jacob Brown (1775-1828), an officer of the War of 1812 &0000000000042285.00000042,285 &0000000000000491.760000491.76 sq mi
(&0000000000001274.0000001,274 km²)
State map highlighting Brown County
Butler County 017 Hamilton May 1, 1803 Hamilton County General Richard Butler (1743-1791), killed at the Battle of the Wabash &0000000000332807.000000332,807 &0000000000000467.270000467.27 sq mi
(&0000000000001210.0000001,210 km²)
State map highlighting Butler County
Carroll County 019 Carrollton January 1, 1833 Columbiana, Stark, Harrison, Jefferson, and Tuscarawas Counties Charles Carroll (1737-1832), last surviving signer of the United States Declaration of Independence &0000000000028836.00000028,836 &0000000000000394.670000394.67 sq mi
(&0000000000001022.0000001,022 km²)
State map highlighting Carroll County
Champaign County 021 Urbana March 1, 1805 Greene and Franklin Counties French for "a plain", describing the land in the area &0000000000038890.00000038,890 &0000000000000428.560000428.56 sq mi
(&0000000000001110.0000001,110 km²)
State map highlighting Champaign County
Clark County 023 Springfield March 1, 1818 Champaign, Madison, and Greene Counties General George Rogers Clark (1752-1818), defeated the Shawnee Indians in a battle near the Springfield area &0000000000144742.000000144,742 &0000000000000399.860000399.86 sq mi
(&0000000000001036.0000001,036 km²)
State map highlighting Clark County
Clermont County 025 Batavia December 6, 1800 Hamilton County French for "clear mountain" &0000000000177977.000000177,977 &0000000000000451.990000451.99 sq mi
(&0000000000001171.0000001,171 km²)
State map highlighting Clermont County
Clinton County 027 Wilmington March 1, 1810 Highland and Warren Counties George Clinton (1739-1812), vice-president when the county was organized &0000000000040543.00000040,543 &0000000000000410.880000410.88 sq mi
(&0000000000001064.0000001,064 km²)
State map highlighting Clinton County
Columbiana County 029 Lisbon May 1, 1803 Jefferson and Washington Counties Derived from the words Christopher Columbus and Anna &0000000000112075.000000112,075 &0000000000000532.460000532.46 sq mi
(&0000000000001379.0000001,379 km²)
State map highlighting Columbiana County
Coshocton County 031 Coshocton January 31, 1810 Muskingum and Tuscarawas Counties Delaware Indian word meaning "union of waters" &0000000000036655.00000036,655 &0000000000000564.070000564.07 sq mi
(&0000000000001461.0000001,461 km²)
State map highlighting Coshocton County
Crawford County 033 Bucyrus April 1, 1820 Delaware County Colonel William Crawford (1732-1782), Revolutionary War officer &0000000000046966.00000046,966 &0000000000000402.110000402.11 sq mi
(&0000000000001041.0000001,041 km²)
State map highlighting Crawford County
Cuyahoga County 035 Cleveland June 7, 1807 Geauga County Cuyahoga River, which means "crooked river" in an Iroquoian language[8] &0000000001393978.0000001,393,978 &0000000000000458.490000458.49 sq mi
(&0000000000001187.0000001,187 km²)
State map highlighting Cuyahoga County
Darke County 037 Greenville January 3, 1809 Miami County General William Darke (1736-1801), Revolutionary War officer &0000000000053309.00000053,309 &0000000000000599.800000599.80 sq mi
(&0000000000001553.0000001,553 km²)
State map highlighting Darke County
Defiance County 039 Defiance April 7, 1845 Williams, Henry, and Paulding Counties Fort Defiance, built in 1794 by General Anthony Wayne &0000000000039500.00000039,500 &0000000000000411.160000411.16 sq mi
(&0000000000001065.0000001,065 km²)
State map highlighting Defiance County
Delaware County 041 Delaware April 1, 1808 Franklin County Delaware Indians &0000000000110106.000000110,106 &0000000000000442.410000442.41 sq mi
(&0000000000001146.0000001,146 km²)
State map highlighting Delaware County
Erie County 043 Sandusky March 15, 1838 Huron and Sandusky Counties Erie Indians &0000000000079551.00000079,551 &0000000000000254.880000254.88 sq mi
(&0000000000000660.000000660 km²)
State map highlighting Erie County
Fairfield County 045 Lancaster December 9, 1800 Ross and Washington Counties Named for the beauty of its "fair fields" &0000000000122759.000000122,759 &0000000000000505.110000505.11 sq mi
(&0000000000001308.0000001,308 km²)
State map highlighting Fairfield County
Fayette County 047 Washington Court House March 1, 1810 Ross and Highland Counties Marquis de Lafayette, French military officer and aristocrat who participated in both the American and French revolutions. &0000000000028433.00000028,433 &0000000000000406.580000406.58 sq mi
(&0000000000001053.0000001,053 km²)
State map highlighting Fayette County
Franklin County 049 Columbus April 30, 1803 Ross and Wayne Counties Benjamin Franklin (1706-1791) - Founding Father, author, printer, satirist, political theorist, scientist, inventor and statesman. &0000000001068978.0000001,068,978 &0000000000000539.870000539.87 sq mi
(&0000000000001398.0000001,398 km²)
State map highlighting Franklin County
Fulton County 051 Wauseon April 1, 1850 Lucas, Henry, and Williams Counties Robert Fulton (1765 – 1815), inventor of the steamboat &0000000000042084.00000042,084 &0000000000000406.780000406.78 sq mi
(&0000000000001054.0000001,054 km²)
State map highlighting Fulton County
Gallia County 053 Gallipolis April 30, 1803 Washington and Adams Counties Gaul, the ancient name of France &0000000000031069.00000031,069 &0000000000000468.780000468.78 sq mi
(&0000000000001214.0000001,214 km²)
State map highlighting Gallia County
Geauga County 055 Chardon March 1, 1806 Trumbull County A Native American word meaning "raccoon" &0000000000090895.00000090,895 &0000000000000403.660000403.66 sq mi
(&0000000000001045.0000001,045 km²)
State map highlighting Geauga County
Greene County 057 Xenia May 1, 1803 Hamilton and Ross Counties General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), Revolutionary War officer &0000000000147886.000000147,886 &0000000000000414.880000414.88 sq mi
(&0000000000001075.0000001,075 km²)
State map highlighting Greene County
Guernsey County 059 Cambridge March 1, 1810 Belmont and Muskingum Counties Island of Guernsey, from where most of the settlers originated &0000000000040792.00000040,792 &0000000000000521.900000521.90 sq mi
(&0000000000001352.0000001,352 km²)
State map highlighting Guernsey County
Hamilton County 061 Cincinnati January 2, 1790 One of the original counties Alexander Hamilton (1755/7-1804), Secretary of the Treasury when the county was organized &0000000000845303.000000845,303 &0000000000000407.360000407.36 sq mi
(&0000000000001055.0000001,055 km²)
State map highlighting Hamilton County
Hancock County 063 Findlay April 1, 1820 Logan County John Hancock (1737-1793), president of the Continental Congress &0000000000071295.00000071,295 &0000000000000531.350000531.35 sq mi
(&0000000000001376.0000001,376 km²)
State map highlighting Hancock County
Hardin County 065 Kenton April 1, 1820 Logan County General John Hardin (1753–1792), Revolutionary War officer &0000000000031945.00000031,945 &0000000000000470.290000470.29 sq mi
(&0000000000001218.0000001,218 km²)
State map highlighting Hardin County
Harrison County 067 Cadiz February 1, 1813 Jefferson and Tuscarawas Counties General William Henry Harrison (1773–1841), an officer of the War of 1812 &0000000000015856.00000015,856 &0000000000000403.530000403.53 sq mi
(&0000000000001045.0000001,045 km²)
State map highlighting Harrison County
Henry County 069 Napoleon April 1, 1820 Shelby County Patrick Henry (1736–1799), Revolutionary War officer &0000000000029210.00000029,210 &0000000000000416.500000416.50 sq mi
(&0000000000001079.0000001,079 km²)
State map highlighting Henry County
Highland County 071 Hillsboro May 1, 1805 Ross, Adams, and Clermont Counties Descriptive of the county's terrain &0000000000040875.00000040,875 &0000000000000553.280000553.28 sq mi
(&0000000000001433.0000001,433 km²)
State map highlighting Highland County
Hocking County 073 Logan March 1, 1818 Athens, Ross, and Fairfield Counties Possibly derived from the Delaware Indian word "Hoch-Hoch-ing", meaning "bottle" &0000000000028241.00000028,241 &0000000000000422.750000422.75 sq mi
(&0000000000001095.0000001,095 km²)
State map highlighting Hocking County
Holmes County 075 Millersburg January 20, 1824 Coshocton, Wayne, and Tuscarawas Counties Major Andrew Holmes (d. 1814), a War of 1812 officer &0000000000038943.00000038,943 &0000000000000422.990000422.99 sq mi
(&0000000000001096.0000001,096 km²)
State map highlighting Holmes County
Huron County 077 Norwalk March 7, 1809 Portage and Cuyahoga Counties Huron Indians &0000000000059847.00000059,847 &0000000000000492.690000492.69 sq mi
(&0000000000001276.0000001,276 km²)
State map highlighting Huron County
Jackson County 079 Jackson March 1, 1816 Scioto, Gallia, Athens, and Ross Counties General Andrew Jackson (1767–1845) &0000000000032641.00000032,641 &0000000000000420.280000420.28 sq mi
(&0000000000001089.0000001,089 km²)
State map highlighting Jackson County
Jefferson County 081 Steubenville July 29, 1797 Washington County Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), Vice President when the county was organized &0000000000073894.00000073,894 &0000000000000409.610000409.61 sq mi
(&0000000000001061.0000001,061 km²)
State map highlighting Jefferson County
Knox County 083 Mount Vernon March 1, 1808 Fairfield County General Henry Knox, the first Secretary of War &0000000000054500.00000054,500 &0000000000000527.120000527.12 sq mi
(&0000000000001365.0000001,365 km²)
State map highlighting Knox County
Lake County 085 Painesville March 6, 1840 Geauga and Cuyahoga Counties Named as such due to it bordering Lake Erie &0000000000227511.000000227,511 &0000000000000228.210000228.21 sq mi
(&0000000000000591.000000591 km²)
State map highlighting Lake County
Lawrence County 087 Ironton December 21, 1815 Gallia and Scioto Counties Captain James Lawrence (1781–1813), naval hero in the War of 1812 &0000000000062319.00000062,319 &0000000000000454.960000454.96 sq mi
(&0000000000001178.0000001,178 km²)
State map highlighting Lawrence County
Licking County 089 Newark March 1, 1808 Fairfield County Named for the salt licks in the area &0000000000145491.000000145,491 &0000000000000686.500000686.50 sq mi
(&0000000000001778.0000001,778 km²)
State map highlighting Licking County
Logan County 091 Bellefontaine March 1, 1818 Champaign County General Benjamin Logan (c.1742–1802) , who destroyed Shawnee Indian towns in the county &0000000000046005.00000046,005 &0000000000000458.440000458.44 sq mi
(&0000000000001187.0000001,187 km²)
State map highlighting Logan County
Lorain County 093 Elyria December 26, 1822 Huron, Cuyahoga, and Medina Counties Province of Lorraine, France &0000000000284664.000000284,664 &0000000000000492.500000492.50 sq mi
(&0000000000001276.0000001,276 km²)
State map highlighting Lorain County
Lucas County 095 Toledo June 20, 1835 Wood, Sandusky, and Huron Counties Robert Lucas (1781–1853), Governor of Ohio when the county was created &0000000000455054.000000455,054 &0000000000000340.460000340.46 sq mi
(&0000000000000882.000000882 km²)
State map highlighting Lucas County
Madison County 097 London March 1, 1810 Franklin County President James Madison (1751-1836) &0000000000040213.00000040,213 &0000000000000465.440000465.44 sq mi
(&0000000000001205.0000001,205 km²)
State map highlighting Madison County
Mahoning County 099 Youngstown March 1, 1846 Columbiana and Trumbull Counties Mahoning River, a Native American word meaning "at the licks" &0000000000257555.000000257,555 &0000000000000415.250000415.25 sq mi
(&0000000000001075.0000001,075 km²)
State map highlighting Mahoning County
Marion County 101 Marion April 1, 1820 Delaware County General Francis Marion (1732-1795), lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army and later brigadier general in the American Revolutionary War. &0000000000066217.00000066,217 &0000000000000403.840000403.84 sq mi
(&0000000000001046.0000001,046 km²)
State map highlighting Marion County
Medina County 103 Medina February 18, 1812 Portage County Medina, capital of the Al Madinah Province in western Saudi Arabia &0000000000151095.000000151,095 &0000000000000421.550000421.55 sq mi
(&0000000000001092.0000001,092 km²)
State map highlighting Medina County
Meigs County 105 Pomeroy April 1, 1819 Gallia and Athens Counties Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr. (1764-1825), Governor of Ohio and Postmaster General at the time the county was organized &0000000000023072.00000023,072 &0000000000000429.420000429.42 sq mi
(&0000000000001112.0000001,112 km²)
State map highlighting Meigs County
Mercer County 107 Celina April 1, 1820 Darke County General Hugh Mercer (1726-1777), a Revolutionary War officer &0000000000040924.00000040,924 &0000000000000463.270000463.27 sq mi
(&0000000000001200.0000001,200 km²)
State map highlighting Mercer County
Miami County 109 Troy March 1, 1807 Montgomery County Miami Indians &0000000000098868.00000098,868 &0000000000000407.040000407.04 sq mi
(&0000000000001054.0000001,054 km²)
State map highlighting Miami County
Monroe County 111 Woodsfield January 29, 1813 Belmont, Washington, and Guernsey Counties James Monroe (1758-1831), Secretary of State when the county was organized &0000000000015180.00000015,180 &0000000000000455.540000455.54 sq mi
(&0000000000001180.0000001,180 km²)
State map highlighting Monroe County
Montgomery County 113 Dayton May 1, 1803 Hamilton and Wayne Counties General Richard Montgomery (1738-1775), a Revolutionary War officer &0000000000559062.000000559,062 &0000000000000461.680000461.68 sq mi
(&0000000000001196.0000001,196 km²)
State map highlighting Montgomery County
Morgan County 115 McConnelsville December 29, 1817 Washington, Guernsey, and Muskingum Counties General Daniel Morgan (c.1735–1802), a Revolutionary War officer &0000000000014897.00000014,897 &0000000000000417.660000417.66 sq mi
(&0000000000001082.0000001,082 km²)
State map highlighting Morgan County
Morrow County 117 Mount Gilead March 1, 1848 Knox, Marion, Delaware, and Richland Counties Jeremiah Morrow (1771–1852), Governor of Ohio &0000000000031628.00000031,628 &0000000000000406.220000406.22 sq mi
(&0000000000001052.0000001,052 km²)
State map highlighting Morrow County
Muskingum County 119 Zanesville March 1, 1803 Washington and Fairfield Counties A Native American word meaning "A town by the river"
or
a Native American word meaning "by the river side"
&0000000000084585.00000084,585 &0000000000000664.630000664.63 sq mi
(&0000000000001721.0000001,721 km²)
State map highlighting Muskingum County
Noble County 121 Caldwell April 1, 1851 Monroe, Washington, Morgan, and Guernsey Counties James Noble (1785–1831), an early settler &0000000000014058.00000014,058 &0000000000000399.000000399.00 sq mi
(&0000000000001033.0000001,033 km²)
State map highlighting Noble County
Ottawa County 123 Port Clinton March 6, 1840 Erie, Sandusky, and Lucas Counties Named for the Ottawa Indians; Ottawa means "trader" in their language &0000000000040985.00000040,985 &0000000000000254.950000254.95 sq mi
(&0000000000000660.000000660 km²)
State map highlighting Ottawa County
Paulding County 125 Paulding April 1, 1820 Darke County John Paulding (1758–1818), captor of spy John André during the Revolutionary War &0000000000020293.00000020,293 &0000000000000416.260000416.26 sq mi
(&0000000000001078.0000001,078 km²)
State map highlighting Paulding County
Perry County 127 New Lexington March 1, 1818 Washington, Fairfield, and Muskingum Counties Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785–1819), a naval officer of the War of 1812 &0000000000034078.00000034,078 &0000000000000409.780000409.78 sq mi
(&0000000000001061.0000001,061 km²)
State map highlighting Perry County
Pickaway County 129 Circleville March 1, 1810 Ross, Fairfield, and Franklin Counties A misspelling of the Piqua tribe, a branch of the Shawnee
or
A variant of a Native American word "Piqua"
&0000000000052727.00000052,727 &0000000000000501.910000501.91 sq mi
(&0000000000001300.0000001,300 km²)
State map highlighting Pickaway County
Pike County 131 Waverly February 1, 1815 Ross, Scioto, and Adams Counties General Zebulon M. Pike (1779–1813), a Revolutionary War officer and discoverer of Pikes Peak in Colorado in 1806 &0000000000027695.00000027,695 &0000000000000441.490000441.49 sq mi
(&0000000000001143.0000001,143 km²)
State map highlighting Pike County
Portage County 133 Ravenna June 7, 1807 Trumbull County Derived from an Indian portage &0000000000152061.000000152,061 &0000000000000492.390000492.39 sq mi
(&0000000000001275.0000001,275 km²)
State map highlighting Portage County
Preble County 135 Eaton March 1, 1808 Montgomery and Butler Counties Captain Edward Preble (1761-1807), a Naval commander in the Revolutionary War &0000000000042337.00000042,337 &0000000000000424.800000424.80 sq mi
(&0000000000001100.0000001,100 km²)
State map highlighting Preble County
Putnam County 137 Ottawa April 1, 1820 Shelby County General Israel Putnam (1718–1790), a Revolutionary War officer &0000000000034726.00000034,726 &0000000000000483.870000483.87 sq mi
(&0000000000001253.0000001,253 km²)
State map highlighting Putnam County
Richland County 139 Mansfield March 1, 1808 Fairfield County Descriptive of the soil in the area &0000000000128852.000000128,852 &0000000000000496.880000496.88 sq mi
(&0000000000001287.0000001,287 km²)
State map highlighting Richland County
Ross County 141 Chillicothe August 20, 1798 Adams and Washington Counties Named for James Ross by territorial governor Arthur St. Clair &0000000000073345.00000073,345 &0000000000000688.410000688.41 sq mi
(&0000000000001783.0000001,783 km²)
State map highlighting Ross County
Sandusky County 143 Fremont April 1, 1820 Huron County An Iroquois word meaning "cold water" &0000000000061792.00000061,792 &0000000000000409.180000409.18 sq mi
(&0000000000001060.0000001,060 km²)
State map highlighting Sandusky County
Scioto County 145 Portsmouth May 1, 1803 Adams County Scioto River; Scioto is a Wyandot word meaning "deer" &0000000000079195.00000079,195 &0000000000000612.270000612.27 sq mi
(&0000000000001586.0000001,586 km²)
State map highlighting Scioto County
Seneca County 147 Tiffin April 1, 1820 Huron County Seneca Indians, who had a reservation in the county area at the time &0000000000058683.00000058,683 &0000000000000550.590000550.59 sq mi
(&0000000000001426.0000001,426 km²)
State map highlighting Seneca County
Shelby County 149 Sidney April 1, 1819 Miami County General Isaac Shelby (1750–1826), a Revolutionary War officer and Governor of Kentucky, &0000000000047910.00000047,910 &0000000000000409.270000409.27 sq mi
(&0000000000001060.0000001,060 km²)
State map highlighting Shelby County
Stark County 151 Canton February 13, 1808 Columbiana County General John Stark (1728–1822) , a Revolutionary War officer; known as the "Hero of Bennington" for his exemplary service at the Battle of Bennington in 1777 &0000000000378098.000000378,098 &0000000000000576.140000576.14 sq mi
(&0000000000001492.0000001,492 km²)
State map highlighting Stark County
Summit County 153 Akron March 3, 1840 Medina, Portage, and Stark Counties Derived from having the highest elevation along the Ohio Canal &0000000000542899.000000542,899 &0000000000000412.720000412.72 sq mi
(&0000000000001069.0000001,069 km²)
State map highlighting Summit County
Trumbull County 155 Warren July 10, 1800 Jefferson and Wayne Counties Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785), Governor of Connecticut when the county was organized &0000000000225116.000000225,116 &0000000000000616.480000616.48 sq mi
(&0000000000001597.0000001,597 km²)
State map highlighting Trumbull County
Tuscarawas County 157 New Philadelphia March 15, 1808 Muskingum County Tuscarawas River, meaning "open mouth river"
or
the Tuscarawas tribe who lived on the river
&0000000000090914.00000090,914 &0000000000000567.580000567.58 sq mi
(&0000000000001470.0000001,470 km²)
State map highlighting Tuscarawas County
Union County 159 Marysville April 1, 1820 Delaware, Franklin, Logan, and Madison Counties Named as such due to it formed by a union of four counties &0000000000040909.00000040,909 &0000000000000436.650000436.65 sq mi
(&0000000000001131.0000001,131 km²)
State map highlighting Union County
Van Wert County 161 Van Wert April 1, 1820 Darke County Isaac Van Wart (1760-1828), captor of spy John André during the Revolutionary War &0000000000029659.00000029,659 &0000000000000410.090000410.09 sq mi
(&0000000000001062.0000001,062 km²)
State map highlighting Van Wert County
Vinton County 163 McArthur March 23, 1850 Athens, Gallia, Hocking, Jackson, and Ross Counties Samuel Finley Vinton (1792-1862), Ohio Statesman and U.S. Congressman &0000000000012806.00000012,806 &0000000000000414.080000414.08 sq mi
(&0000000000001072.0000001,072 km²)
State map highlighting Vinton County
Warren County 165 Lebanon May 1, 1803 Hamilton County General Joseph Warren (1741-1775), a Revolutionary War officer &0000000000158383.000000158,383 &0000000000000399.630000399.63 sq mi
(&0000000000001035.0000001,035 km²)
State map highlighting Warren County
Washington County 167 Marietta July 27, 1788 One of the original counties George Washington (1732–1799), president of the Constitutional Convention &0000000000063251.00000063,251 &0000000000000635.150000635.15 sq mi
(&0000000000001645.0000001,645 km²)
State map highlighting Washington County
Wayne County 169 Wooster March 1, 1808 From non-county area General Anthony Wayne (1745–1796), a Revolutionary War officer &0000000000111564.000000111,564 &0000000000000555.360000555.36 sq mi
(&0000000000001438.0000001,438 km²)
State map highlighting Wayne County
Williams County 171 Bryan April 1, 1820 Darke County David Williams (1754-1831), captor of spy John André during the Revolutionary War &0000000000039188.00000039,188 &0000000000000421.740000421.74 sq mi
(&0000000000001092.0000001,092 km²)
State map highlighting Williams County
Wood County 173 Bowling Green April 1, 1820 Refactored from non-county territory Eleazer D. Wood (1783 -1814), founder of Fort Meigs &0000000000121065.000000121,065 &0000000000000617.320000617.32 sq mi
(&0000000000001599.0000001,599 km²)
State map highlighting Wood County
Wyandot County 175 Upper Sandusky February 3, 1845 Marion, Crawford, and Hardin Counties Wyandot Indians &0000000000022908.00000022,908 &0000000000000405.610000405.61 sq mi
(&0000000000001051.0000001,051 km²)
State map highlighting Wyandot County

See also

References

  1. ^ "FIPS Publish 6-4". National Institute of Standards and Technology. http://www.itl.nist.gov/fipspubs/fip6-4.htm. Retrieved 2007-04-11.  
  2. ^ a b "EPA County FIPS Code Listing". EPA. http://www.epa.gov/enviro/html/codes/tx.html. Retrieved 2007-04-09.  
  3. ^ a b c d "NACo - Find a County". http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/state.cfm&statecode=oh. Retrieved 2007-07-22.  
  4. ^ a b "Federal Roster: Counties of Ohio, Derivation of Name and Date of Erection". http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/PublicAffairs/fedRoster.aspx?Section=1585. Retrieved 2007-07-22.  
  5. ^ a b "Ohio Genealogy Clickable County Map". http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/oh/1/counties.htm. Retrieved 2007-07-25.  
  6. ^ Resolution of 111th Ohio General Assembly designating John Allen as the person for which Allen County was named.
  7. ^ Ashtabula, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2007. Accessed 2007-11-19.
  8. ^ Cuyahoga River, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2007. Accessed 2007-11-19.
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This list of Ohio county name etymologies lists the 88 counties of the U.S. state of Ohio, with the date of their creation. There is significant disagreement among the etymologists who have addressed the origins of many of these names. Where such disagreement exists each proposed etymology is listed. Note that many names are believed to be derived from American Indian names and words, and that some of the etymologists in this area have been unable to determine the particular Indian language which provided the names.

Contents A B C D E F G H J K L M N O P R S T U V W Top of PageAnalysis of namesReferences

A

Adams County (July 10, 1797):
  1. For John Adams, [1] President of the United States at the time the county was named
  2. For President John Quincy Adams[2]
Allen County (1820):
  1. For Ethan Allen of the Green Mountain Boys during the American Revolutionary War
  2. For Colonel John Allen, a soldier in the War of 1812[1][3]
Ashland County (1846):
  1. For the home of Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky near Lexington[2][1]
Ashtabula County (1807):
  1. For the Ashtabula River, Ashtabula being an Indian word for "fish river"[3]
  2. For the Algonquian word for either "river of many fish" or "there are always enough moving"[2]
  3. For the Indian word meaning "fish"[1]
  4. For the Indian word meaning "halfway place"[4]
  5. For the Indian word meaning "river of many fish"[5]
  6. For the Indian word meaning "there-are-always-enough moving"[6]
Athens County (1805):
  1. For Athens, Greece, as the state university was there[2][1]
Auglaize County (1848):
  1. For the Auglaize River, "auglaize" being a corruption of the French "eau glaise" or muddy water.
  2. For the Auglaize River, "auglaize" being an Indian word for "fallen timbers". At the confluence of the Auglaize and Maumee rivers was fought the Battle of Fallen Timbers. [1]
  3. For the Indian word for "overgrown with brush"[4]
  4. For the Indian word for "at the lick"[7]

B

Belmont County (September 7, 1801):
  1. For the French for "beautiful mountain" for the scenery there.
  2. For the French for "a fine mountain"[3]
Brown County (1818):
  1. For Major General Jacob Brown, an officer in the War of 1812 who was wounded at the Battle of Lundy's Lane.[1]
Butler County (1803):
  1. For General Richard Butler, an officer in the American Revolutionary War who was killed by the Indians in 1790.[1][2]

C

Carroll County (1833):
  1. For Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence[1][2]
Champaign County (1805):
  1. For the French for "plain" as the land there was very flat.[1]
Clark County (1818):
  1. For General George Rogers Clark, who served in the Northwest Indian War, but is mainly famous for the conquest of the Illinois Territory in 1778 and 1779. [2][1]
Clermont County (December 6, 1800):
  1. For the province of Clermont in France[3]
  2. For the French for "clear mountain" despite the absence of mountains there[2]
  3. For Clermont, or Clear Mountain, France[1]
Clinton County (1810):
  1. For Vice President of the United States George Clinton[2][1]
Columbiana County (1803):
  1. For Christopher Columbus[2][1]
  2. Also for Queen Anne.[8]
  3. Howe states "Kilbourn, in his 'Gazeteer,' says: 'Columbiana is a fancy name, taken from the names Columbus and Anna'"
Coshocton County (1810):
  1. For the Delaware Indian word meaning "union of waters"
  2. For the Delaware Indian word meaning "black bear town" (cush-og-wenk) or "union of waters" ("coshoc-gung")[2]
  3. For the Delaware Indian word meaning "black bear town"[1]
  4. For the Indian word for either "habitation of owls," "union of waters," or "finished small harbor"[4]
  5. For the Indian word for "where there is a river crossing"[7]
  6. For the Indian word for "river crossing" or "ferry"[6]
  7. For the Indian village "Goshachgunk"[3]
Crawford County (1820):
  1. For United States Secretary of the Treasury William Crawford
  2. For Colonel William Crawford, an officer in the American Revolutionary War burned at the stake by Indians--this seems more likely[1][3]
Cuyahoga County (1807):
  1. For the Cuyahoga River, it being an Indian word meaning "crooked"[1][3]
  2. For the Indian word for either "crooked", "lake river", or "news carrier"[4]
  3. For the Indian word for "the important river"[6]

D

Darke County (1809):
  1. For General William Darke, an officer in the American Revolutionary War
Defiance County (1845):
  1. For Fort Defiance, so named by General "Mad" Anthony Wayne because it was near the site of St. Clair's Defeat, the worst defeat ever suffered by the U.S. Army against the Indians, was fought and Wayne wanted to show resolve and dared or "defied" them to attack again.)
Delaware County (1808):
  1. For the Delaware Indians, who took their name from the proprietors of the state of Delaware, the Lords De La Warr.
  2. For the Delaware Indians, who took their name from Delaware Bay[9]

E

Erie County (1838):
  1. For the Erie Indians, whose name was their word for "cat", there being many wildcats in the area.
  2. For the Erie Indians, whose name was their word for "cat", but who lived in New York State[2]
  3. For the Indian word for "lake of the cat"[9]
  4. For the Indian word for "wildcat"[4]
  5. For the Indian word for "cat"[10]
  6. For the Indian word for "the Cat nation"[6]

F

Fairfield County (December 9, 1800):
  1. For the country there.
Fayette County (1810):
  1. For the Marquis de Lafayette, an officer in the American Revolutionary War
Franklin County (1803):
  1. For Benjamin Franklin
Fulton County (1850):
  1. For steamboat pioneer Robert Fulton

G

Gallia County (1803):
  1. For the Latin word for France, as French settlers lived there
Geauga County (1806):
  1. For the Indian word meaning "raccoon"[1]
  2. For the Indian word meaning "raccoon river" or "dogs around the fire"[4]
Greene County (1803):
  1. For General Nathaniel Greene, an officer in the American Revolutionary War
Guernsey County (1810):
  1. For the island of Guernsey in the Channel Islands

H

Hamilton County (January 2, 1790):
  1. For United States Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton
Hancock County (1820):
  1. For John Hancock, first signer of the Declaration of Independence
Hardin County (1820):
  1. For General John Hardin, an officer in the American Revolutionary War, killed in Ohio in 1792 during the Northwest Indian War
Harrison County (1813):
  1. For General William Henry Harrison, an officer in the War of 1812 and later President of the United States
Henry County (1820):
  1. For Virginia legislator Patrick Henry
Highland County (1805):
  1. For the hilly country there
  2. For the ridge there that divided the Little Miami River and Scioto River's watersheds[1][3]
Hocking County (1818):
  1. For the Hocking River
  2. For the Delaware Indian word for "gourd" or "bottle"[2][1]
  3. For the Indian word for "high up there is land"[11]
  4. For the Indian word for "above-there-is-arable-land"[6]
  5. For the Delaware Indian word "Hock-hock-ing," meaning "bottle" of the Shawnee Indian word "wea-tha-kagh-qua-sepe" meaning "bottle river"[3]
Holmes County (1824):
  1. For Major Andrew Holmes, an officer in the War of 1812 killed at Mackinac Island, Michigan
Huron County (1809):
  1. For the Huron Indians
  2. For the Huron Indians, whose name is French for a kind of peasant[9]
  3. For the Indian word for "wild boar"[4]
  4. For the Indian word for "a rough person"[11]
  5. For the Indian word for "because of the straight locks, like bristles of a wild boar"[10]
  6. For the name the French explorers gave to the Wyandot Indians[3]

J

Jackson County (1816):
  1. For General Andrew Jackson, an officer in the War of 1812 and later President of the United States
Jefferson County (July 29, 1797):
  1. For Vice President of the United States (and later President) Thomas Jefferson

K

Knox County (1808):
  1. For General Henry Knox, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and later first Secretary of War

L

Lake County (1840):
  1. For its position on Lake Erie
Lawrence County (1815):
  1. For Captain James Lawrence, a Naval officer in the War of 1812 famous for his remark "Don't give up the ship!"
Licking County (1808):
  1. For salt licks in the area
Logan County (1818):
  1. For General Benjamin Logan, who fought Indians there
Lorain County (1822):
  1. For the province of Lorraine in France
Lucas County (1835):
  1. For Governor Robert Lucas, who called out the militia to defend the area from Michigan, which claimed it as its own.

M

Madison County (1810):
  1. For James Madison, who was President of the United States at the time.
Mahoning County (1846):
  1. For an Indian word for "at the salt licks"
  2. For an Indian word for "salt licks"[1]
  3. Howe states: "It derived its name from Mahoning river. The name Mahoning is, according to Heckwelder, derived from either the Indian word Mahoni, signifying "a lick," or Mahonink, "at the lick".
Marion County (1820):
  1. For the "Swamp Fox", General Francis Marion, an officer in the American Revolutionary War
Medina County (1812):
  1. For Medina, Saudi Arabia
Meigs County (1819):
  1. For Governor Return J. Meigs, Jr., who was Postmaster General when the county was erected
Mercer County (1820):
  1. For General Hugh Mercer, an officer in the American Revolutionary War who died at the Battle of Princeton[2]
Miami County (1807):
  1. For the Ottawa Indian word meaning "mother"
  2. For the Indian word meaning "very large"[9]
  3. For the Indian word meaning "people on the peninsula"[10]
  4. For the Indian word meaning "very large" or "downstream"[6]
Monroe County (1813):
  1. For United States Secretary of State James Monroe, who was later President of the United States
Montgomery County (May 1, 1803):
  1. For General Richard Montgomery, an officer in the American Revolutionary War who led the army that captured Montreal
Morgan County (1817):
  1. For General Daniel Morgan, an officer in the American Revolutionary War
Morrow County (1848):
  1. Governor Jeremiah Morrow
Muskingum County (1803):
  1. For the Indian word meaning "by the river side"
  2. For the Indian word meaning "moose-eye river"[4]
  3. Howe writes: "The word Muskingum, said Kilbourne's Gazetteer, 'is said to signify in the old Indian language an elk's eye, or the glare of an elk's eye.' Col. John Johnston stated that 'Muskingum is a Delaware word and means a town on the river side. The Shawanese call it Wa-ka-tamo sepe, which has the same signification."

N

Noble County (1851):
  1. For James Noble, an early settler there.
  2. For James Noble and Warren P. Noble, early settlers there[2]
  3. For Warren P. Noble, chairman of the Ohio General Assembly's committee on new counties[1]
  4. For James Noble, the first settler near Sarahsville, Ohio[3]

O

Ottawa County (1840):
  1. For an Indian word meaning "trader" (Rydjord)
  2. For the Ottawa Indians, who lived there[2]
  3. For an Indian word meaning "trader", citing H. H. Bancroft[3]

P

Paulding County (1820):
  1. For John Paulding, a captor of spy John André in the American Revolutionary War
Perry County (1818):
  1. For Oliver Hazard Perry, hero of the War of 1812 Battle of Put-in-Bay. says "Commodore Perry", which is Oliver's brother.)
Pickaway County (1810):
  1. For variation on the same Indian word that Piqua, Ohio is named for.
  2. For the Piqua Indians who lived there[2]
  3. For a variant spelling of Piqua, the Indian's capital[1]
  4. For the Indian word for "ashes"[4]
Pike County (1815):
  1. For General Zebulon Pike, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and an explorer of the American West. (could not have been an officer in Revolution--was 4 yrs. old when it ended)
Portage County (1807):
  1. For the portage between the Cuyahoga and the Tuscarawas River Rivers
  2. For the portage between the Cuyahoga and Mahoning Rivers[2]
Preble County (1808):
  1. For Captain Edward Preble, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and in the war against the Barbary Pirates.
Putnam County (1820):
  1. For General Israel Putnam, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.[3]
  2. For Rufus Putnam, a soldier in the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War[1]

R

Richland County (1808):
  1. For the fertile soil there
Ross County (August 20, 1798):
  1. For Senator James Ross of Pennsylvania, a Federalist.

S

Sandusky County (1820):
  1. For the Indian word meaning "cold water"
  2. For the Iroquois word "Sandoos-tie", meaning "cold water"[2]
  3. For the Indian word meaning "at the cold water"[1]
  4. For the Indian word meaning "there is pure water here"[4]
Scioto County (1803):
  1. For the Scioto River
  2. For the Indian word meaning "deer"[1]
  3. For the Indian word meaning "great legs"[4]
  4. For the Indian word meaning "good hunting"[7]
  5. For the Wyandot Indian word meaning "deer"[2]
  6. For the Wyandot Indian word Sci-on-to, whose meaning is unknown[3]
Seneca County (1820):
  1. For the Seneca Indians, who had a reservation here[3]
  2. For Seneca County, New York[2]
  3. For the Seneca Indians, whose name is from the Dutch "sinnekaas"[4]
  4. For the Indian word, transliterated into English in the form of the name of the Roman writer Seneca[6]
Shelby County (1819):
  1. For General Isaac Shelby, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and later Governor of Kentucky.
  2. For Shelby County, Kentucky[2]
Stark County (1808):
  1. For General John Stark, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.
Summit County (1840):
  1. For the highest point on the Ohio and Erie Canal which was located there.

T

Trumbull County (July 10, 1800):
  1. For Governor Jonathan Trumbull of Connecticut. (This was in the Western Reserve, which was once part of Connecticut.)
Tuscarawas County (1808):
  1. For the Tuscarawas River, supposedly an Indian word meaning "open mouth". [3]
  2. For the Indian word meaning "old town" or "open mouth"[4]

U

Union County (1820):
  1. For its formation from the union of parts of four counties, Delaware, Franklin, Madison, and Logan[3]

V

Van Wert County (1820):
  1. For Isaac Van Wart, one of the captors of spy John André in the American Revolutionary War--the spelling was changed for the county name[3]
Vinton County (1850):
  1. For Congressman Samuel Finley Vinton, who also ran for Governor of Ohio as a Whig.

W

Warren County (May 1, 1803):
  1. For General Joseph Warren, a hero of the American Revolutionary War who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill.
  2. For Warren County, Pennsylvania.[2]
Washington County (July 27, 1788):
  1. For General George Washington
Wayne County (August 15, 1796):
  1. For General "Mad" Anthony Wayne
Williams County (1820):
  1. For David Williams, one of the captors of spy John André in the American Revolutionary War
Wood County (1820):
  1. For Captain Eleazer D. Wood, the engineer for General William Henry Harrison's army who built Fort Meigs
Wyandot County (1845):
  1. For the Wyandot Indians, who lived in the area. "Wyandot" supposedly means "around the plains" in their language.[1]
  2. For the Indian word meaning "calf of the leg" or "tobacco tribe"[10]
  3. For the Indian word meaning "dwellers on a peninsula"[10]

Analysis of names

Below are categorized the names of counties by their sources. Each county is counted only one in the main entries. Those listed under "plus" appeared in previous categories, e.g. "Washington" is counted under Presidents of the United States, but also listed under Revolutionary War figures for completeness.

Of Ohio's 88 counties:

Count Named for Counties
Primary Plus
7 Presidents Adams, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and Washington  
1 Vice President Clinton Adams and Jefferson
3 Governors of Ohio Lucas, Meigs, and Morrow  
1 Governor of another state Trumbull Clinton, Henry, Jefferson, Monroe, Shelby
2 a member of Congress Ross and Vinton Carroll, Harrison, Jackson, Madison, Monroe
1 cabinet member Hamilton Jefferson, Knox, Madison, Meigs, Monroe
20 American Revolutionary War: soldiers and officers Allen, Butler, Clark, Darke, Fayette, Greene, Knox, Logan, Marion, Mercer, Montgomery, Morgan, Paulding, Preble, Putnam, Shelby, Stark, Van Wert, Warren, and Williams Monroe, Washington
4 American Revolutionary War: figures who did not fight Carroll, Franklin, Henry, Hancock  
3 Indian fighters: Crawford, Hardin and Wayne Clark, Logan
6 officers and soldiers in the War of 1812 Brown, Holmes, Lawrence, Perry, Pike, Wood Harrison and Jackson
6 places elsewhere Ashland, Athens, Clermont, Gallia, Guernsey, Lorain, and Medina  
8 geographic features Belmont, Champaign, Fairfield, Highland, Lake, Portage, Richland, Summit Auglaize
1 U.S. Army fort Defiance  
1 explorer Columbiana Pike
1 inventor Fulton  
1 circumstances of its creation Union  
1 early settler Noble  
1 naval officer Preble Perry
19 Indian words Ashtabula, Auglaize, Coshocton, Cuyahoga, Delaware, Erie, Geauga, Hocking, Huron, Mahoning, Miami, Muskingum, Ottawa, Pickaway, Sandusky, Scioto, Seneca, Tuscarawas, and Wyandot  

References

General
Specific
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 O'Bryant, Michael (ed.), ed (1996). The Ohio Almanac: an encyclopedia of indispensable information about the Buckeye universe (2nd edition ed.). Wilmington, Ohio: Orange Frazer Press. ISBN 1882203100. 
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 The Encyclopedia of Ohio (2nd edition ed.). New York, NY: Somerset Publishers. 1994. ISBN 0403099633. 
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 Howe, Henry (1904). Historical Collections of Ohio. Cincinnati, Ohio: C.J. Krehbiel for the State of Ohio. 
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 Garnett, Henry (1947). American Names. Washington, D.C.: Public Affairs Press. 
  5. Lindsay, David (1955). Ohio Western Reserve: The Story of its Place Names. Cleveland, Ohio: Western Reserve University. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Stewart, George R. (1970). American place-names; a concise and selective dictionary for the continental United States of America. New York: Oxford University Press. OCLC 95369. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Overman, William D. (1951). Ohio Place Names. Akron, Ohio: Atlantic Press. 
  8. Historical Sketch of Columbiana County
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Stewart, George R. (1945). Names on the Land. New York: Random House. OCLC 419734. 
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Rydjord, John (1968). Indian Place Names. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. 
  11. 11.0 11.1 Overman, William D. (1951). Ohio Town Names. Akron, Ohio: Atlantic Press. 

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