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List of Presidents of the United States by time in office: Wikis

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This is a list of President of the United States by time in office. The basis of the list is the difference between dates; if counted by number of calendar days all the figures would be one greater, with the exception of Grover Cleveland who would receive two days. According to the 22nd Amendment, no President may serve longer than a decade (period of ten years) (2 terms plus a maximum of 2 years having acceded as President under some other President's term). This means that Franklin Delano Roosevelt will continue to be the first on this list until such time as the 22nd Amendment may be changed or repealed, and some future President is re-elected the requisite number of times, pursuant to such a change or repeal.

Rank by time in office

Longest presidency
4,422 days
Franklin D. Roosevelt
from March 1933 to April 1945
Shortest presidency
31 days
William Henry Harrison
in 1841
Barack Obama, currently serving as President for 361 days since January 20, 2009.
# in
office
President Length
in days
Rank by
length
of term
Notes
32 Franklin D. Roosevelt 4,422 1 Served three full terms, died on the 82nd day of his fourth term. His first term in office (1933-1937) was the shortest term for an elected President (after Washington’s) who neither died in office nor resigned. The Twentieth Amendment moved Inauguration Day from March 4 to January 20 beginning in 1937; therefore Roosevelt's first term was 43 days short of a full four years: from March 4, 1933 through January 20, 1937, a period of 1418 days. This also made him the first President to be inaugurated on January 20.
3 Thomas Jefferson 2,922[1] 2 Served two full terms.
4 James Madison 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
5 James Monroe 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
7 Andrew Jackson 2,922 2 Served two full terms.[2]
18 Ulysses S. Grant 2,922 2 Served two full terms.[3]
22/24 Grover Cleveland 2,922 2 Served two full terms, not consecutively. Not reelected on first try for a second term.[2]
28 Woodrow Wilson 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
34 Dwight David Eisenhower 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
40 Ronald Reagan 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
42 Bill Clinton 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
43 George W. Bush 2,922 2 Served two full terms.
1 George Washington 2,865 13 Served two full terms, but the first-term inaugural was postponed 57 days to April 30, 1789 because the U.S. Congress had not properly convened.
33 Harry S. Truman 2,840 14 Served the remainder of Franklin Roosevelt's term, elected to a full term. Did not seek a second term, though eligible under terms of the 22nd Amendment, ratified during his term.
26 Theodore Roosevelt 2,728 15 Served the remainder of McKinley's term, elected to a full term. Four years after leaving office, ran again and lost.[4]
30 Calvin Coolidge 2,040 16 Served the remainder of Harding's term, elected to a full term. Did not seek renomination for a second term.
37 Richard Nixon 2,027 17 Served one full term and resigned during his second term.
36 Lyndon B. Johnson 1,886 18 Served the remainder of Kennedy's term, elected to a full term. Did not seek a second term.
25 William McKinley 1,654[5] 19 Served one full term. Assassinated early in his second term.
16 Abraham Lincoln 1,503 20 Served one full term and was assassinated early in his second term.
6 John Quincy Adams 1,461[6] 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.
8 Martin Van Buren 1,461 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.
11 James Knox Polk 1,461 21 Served one full term. Did not seek a second term.
14 Franklin Pierce 1,461 21 Served one full term. Was denied nomination for second term.
15 James Buchanan 1,461 21 Served one full term. Did not seek a second term.
19 Rutherford B. Hayes 1,461 21 Served one full term. Did not seek a second term.
23 Benjamin Harrison 1,461 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.
27 William Howard Taft 1,461 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.
31 Herbert Hoover 1,461 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.
39 Jimmy Carter 1,461 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.
41 George H. W. Bush 1,461 21 Served one full term. Not reelected.[7]
2 John Adams 1,460[8] 32 Served one full term. Not reelected.
10 John Tyler 1,430 33 Served the remainder of William Harrison's term. Denied renomination by the Whigs, Tyler flirted with the Liberty Party, but was persuaded not to run by the Democrats (his former party).[9]
17 Andrew Johnson 1,419 34 Served the remainder of Lincoln's term. Sought the Democratic nomination in 1868, but was unsuccessful.[9]
21 Chester A. Arthur 1,262 35 Served the remainder of Garfield's term. Sought a full term, but was not re-nominated.[9]
35 John F. Kennedy 1,036 36 Assassinated before serving a full term.
13 Millard Fillmore 969 37 Served the remainder of Taylor's term. Sought the Whig nomination in 1852, but lost to Winfield Scott. Four years later, ran again (as a Know Nothing) and came in third.[9]
38 Gerald Ford 895 38 Served the remainder of Nixon's term. Not elected to a full term.[9]
29 Warren G. Harding 881 39 Died before serving a full term.
12 Zachary Taylor 491 40 Died before serving a full term.[10]
44 Barack Obama 361[11] 41 Incumbent
20 James A. Garfield 199 42 Assassinated less than a year into his term.
9 William Henry Harrison 31 43 Died upon serving just one month.
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Notes

  1. ^ Six 365-day years plus two 366-day years (currently the electoral limit). Jefferson was serving as President on February 29 in 1804 and 1808.
  2. ^ a b Andrew Jackson and Grover Cleveland each won the popular or electoral vote in three different elections, but only served two terms. In Jackson's first presidential bid in 1824, he won the electoral vote—and perhaps the popular vote as well—but was denied the presidency after the election was thrown into the House of Representatives. Cleveland won the popular vote in the election of 1888, but not the electoral vote.
  3. ^ Ulysses S. Grant's name was entered into nomination at the 1880 Republican National Convention, which would have resulted in him running for a third term had he been nominated. Grant was the front-runner through most of the balloting, but compromise candidate James A. Garfield was eventually nominated on the thirty-sixth ballot.
  4. ^ TR ran for a third term on the progressive party ticket in 1912, becoming the only third-party candidate to come in second
  5. ^ Along with J. Adams (see below), McKinley did not serve during a leap year.
  6. ^ Three 365-day years plus one 366-day year. Includes February 29, 1828.
  7. ^ George H. W. Bush and Dick Cheney each served as Acting President for a fraction of a day while a President underwent a medical procedure; this time is not counted.
  8. ^ Of years evenly divisible by 100, only those evenly divisible by 400 are leap years. John Adams' term included 1800, which is divisible by 100, but not by 400.
  9. ^ a b c d e Tyler, Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Arthur, and Ford are the only presidents never to have been elected to that office in their own right, having acceded to it from the Vice presidency upon the death or resignation of their predecessor. Ford is the only President to have never been elected President or Vice President, having been appointed by Richard Nixon according to the terms of the 25th Amendment.
  10. ^ Some historians state that President pro tempore of the United States Senate, David Rice Atchison, served the remaining day after James K. Polk's term expired. This is not officially recognized.
  11. ^ Updated daily according to UTC.

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