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Mathilde Kschessinskaya and Pavel Gerdt in La Bayadère ballet by the ballet master Marius Petipa and the composer Ludwig Minkus, 1900.

This a list of ballet dancers from Russian Federation, Soviet Union and Russian Empire including both ethnic Russians and people of other ethnicities. This list as well includes those, who was born in the  Russian Federation/ Soviet Union/ Russian Empire but later emigrated, and those, who was born elsewhere but immigrated to the country and performed there for a significant portion of their careers.

The original purpose of the ballet in Russia was to entertain the royal court. The first ballet company was the Imperial School of Ballet in St. Petersburg in the 1740s. The Ballets Russes was a ballet company founded in the 1909 by Sergey Diaghilev, an enormously important figure in the Russian ballet scene. Diaghilev and his Ballets Russes' travels abroad profoundly influenced the development of dance worldwide.[1]The headquarters of his ballet company was located in Paris, France. A protégé of Diaghilev, George Balanchine, founded the New York City Ballet Company.

During the early 20th century, many Russian ballet dancers rose to fame. Soviet ballet preserved the perfected 19th century traditions,[2] and the Soviet Union's choreography schools produced one internationally famous star after another. The Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow and the Mariinsky in Saint Petersburg remain famous throughout the world.[3]

For the full plain list of Russian ballet dancers on Wikipedia see the Category:Russian ballet dancers.

Alphabetical list

Contents: Top · 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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A

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Nino Ananiashvili.jpg Nina Ananiashvili
(born 1963)
 Soviet Union
 Russian Federation
 Georgia
(Georgian origin)
prima ballerina
Born in Georgia, Ananiashvili studied in Moscow Choreographic Institute and entered the Bolshoi Ballet in 1981, and later became a prima ballerina. She was the first Soviet dancer to appear as a guest performer with the New York City Ballet in 1988, and subsequently was a principal dancer in the American Ballet Theatre and in the Houston Ballet. She danced in many countries and won various international prizes. In June 2009, she gave her farewell performance with the American Ballet, performing the roles of Odette and Odile in the Swan Lake in New York.
Ananiashvili performing in the Swan Lake

B

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
George Ballanchine.jpg George Balanchine
(1904–1983)
 Russian Empire
 Soviet Union
 France
 United States
(Georgian descent)
choreographer, balletmaster
Balanchine was one of the XX century's foremost choreographers, a balletmaster of the Ballets Russes in France, co-founder and balletmaster of New York City Ballet: his work created modern ballet, based on his deep knowledge of classical forms and techniques.
The New York State Theater, designed to the specifications of Balanchine.
IrinaBaronova1937.jpg Irina Baronova
(1919–2008)
 Soviet Union
 Romania
 France
 United States
 Switzerland
 Russian Federation
 Australia
ballerina, ballet mistress
She was one of the Baby Ballerinas of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, discovered by George Balanchine in Paris in the 1930s. She created roles in Léonide Massine's Le Beau Danube (1924), Jeux d'enfants (1932), and Les Présages (1933); and in Bronislava Nijinska's Les Cent Baisers (1935). Between 1940 and 1951 Baronova appeared in several films, and worked as ballet mistress for the 1980 film Nijinsky.
A photo with Baronova's autograph
Mikhail Baryshnikov
Natalia Bessmertnova

C

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Carherine Chislova.JPG Catherine Chislova
(1846–1889)
 Russian Empire
ballerina

D

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Alexandra Danilova
(1903–1997)
 Russian Empire
 Soviet Union
 France
 United States
ballerina
Danilova as Fanny Cerrito in Pas de Quatre, 1948
Natalia Dudinskaya

F

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Michel Fokine

G

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Yekaterina Geltzer
Elizaveta Gerdt
Pavel Gerdt
Alexander Godunov

I

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Avdotia Istomina

K

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Vera Karalli
Tamara Karsavina
Theodore Kosloff
Mathilde Kschessinska

L

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Olga Lepeshinskaya
Serge Lifar
Lydia Lopokova

M

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Léonide Massine
Asaf Messerer
Sulamith Messerer
Victoria Mironova

N

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Bronislava Nijinska
Vaslav Nijinsky
Rudolf Nureyev

P

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Anna Pavlova
Marina Perry
Marie Petipa
Marius Petipa
Maya Plisetskaya
Olga Preobrajenska

R

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Tatiana Riabouchinska
Ida Rubinstein

S

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Galina Samsova
Marina Semyonova
Daniil Simkin
 Russian Federation
danseur
Olga Spessivtseva
Diable A Quatre -Mazourka -Marie Surovshchikova-Petipa -1861 -2 -cropped.JPG Mariia Surovshchikova-Petipa
(1836–1882)
 Russian Empire
prima ballerina

T

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Vasily Tikhomirov
Tamara Toumanova
(1919–1996)
 Russian SFSR
 France
 United States
(Georgian descent)
prima ballerina
Trained in Paris by Preobrajenska, Toumanova was one of Balanchine's Baby Ballerinas and a close colleague of Léonide Massine. She made her debut in the children's ballet L'Éventail de Jeanne. Nicknamed The Black Pearl of the Russian Ballet, she performed in Balanchine's Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme and Le Palais de Cristal. She appeared in Hollywood films, including The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes, Tonight We Sing (playing Anna Pavlova), Deep in My Heart, Days of Glory, and Alfred Hitchcock's Torn Curtain.
Toumanova and Serge Lifar in the Swan Lake

U

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Russia-2000-stamp-Galina Ulanova.jpg Galina Ulanova
(1910–1998)
 Russian Empire
 Soviet Union
 Russian Federation
prima ballerina assoluta
Trained under Agrippina Vaganova and her own mother, a ballerina of the Imperial Russian Ballet, Ulanova joined the Mariinsky Theatre in 1928. After 1944 she became a prima ballerina assoluta in Bolshoi Theatre. In 1945 she danced the title role in the world premiere of Prokofiev's Cinderella. On her first international tour in 1956 she achieved enormous success. Having retired from the stage in 1960, Ulanova coached many generations of the Russian dancers
Ulanova performing in Giselle

V

Portrait Person Details Stage Image
Agrippina Vaganova
Vladimir Vasiliev
Ekaterina Vazem
Diana Vishneva 22 February 2007.jpg Diana Vishneva
(born 1976)
 Soviet Union
 Russian Federation
prima ballerina
Vishneva is one of the 21st century's leading dancers; she is a prima ballerina at the Mariinsky Ballet since 1995 and performs as a guest in ABT since 2005, as well as on other world scenes. Her repertoire includes Don Quixote, Romeo and Juliet, La Bayadère, Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and Giselle. She also performs in George Balanchine's Jewels and Kenneth MacMillan's Manon.
Paquita pas de trois Pierre Vladimiroff
(1893–1970)
 Russian Empire
 France
 United States
danseur
Anastasia Volochkova

References

  1. ^ Garafola, L (1989). Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Oxford University Press. p. 576. ISBN 0195057015.  
  2. ^ Cashin, K K. "Alexander Pushkin's Influence on Russian Ballet — Chapter Five: Pushkin, Soviet Ballet, and Afterward" (PDF). http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses/available/etd-04072005-133328/unrestricted/12_kkc_chap5.pdf. Retrieved 2007-12-27.  
  3. ^ "A Tale of Two Operas". Petersburg City. http://petersburgcity.com/news/culture/2005/11/18/theatre/. Retrieved 2008-01-11.  

See also


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