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Southern Conference football champions
Conference Football Champions
SouthernConference 100.png
Southern Conference logo
Sport College football
Conference Southern Conference
Played 1933–present
Current champion Appalachian State (10)
Most championships Furman (12)
TV partner(s) SportSouth
Official website SoConSports.com Football

The list of Southern Conference football champions includes 19 distinct teams that have won the college football championship awarded by the Southern Conference since its creation. In total, forty-one teams have sponsored football in the conference.[1] Just three—Elon, Samford and Western Carolina—have never won a Southern Conference football championship.

The conference was formed in 1921 when fourteen members from the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) met in Atlanta, Georgia with the purpose of creating a workable number of conference games for each member.[2] The Southern Conference is notable for having spawned two other major conferences. In 1933, thirteen schools located south and west of the Appalachians (Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi, Mississippi State, Sewanee, Tennessee, Tulane, and Vanderbilt) departed to form the Southeastern Conference.[3] Twenty years later, in 1953, seven schools (Clemson, Duke, Maryland, North Carolina, North Carolina State, South Carolina, and Wake Forest) withdrew to form the Atlantic Coast Conference.[4]

Currently the conference competes at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level in athletics, with the football teams playing in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). There are nine football playing members of the Southern Conference: Appalachian State, Chattanooga, The Citadel, Elon, Furman, Georgia Southern, Samford, Western Carolina, and Wofford. Southern Conference teams have been successful in the NCAA Division I FCS Playoffs, leading all conferences with an 87–49 (.640) record.[5] Current and former Southern Conference teams have won a total of 12 national championships.[5]

Contents

Champions by year

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Undefeated teams: 1922–1932

The Southern Conference does not officially recognize championships claimed from the 1922–32 seasons,[6] as there were upwards of 20 to 23 teams competing within the conference during this time. However, some championships are still cited, such as Georgia Tech's claim of 1922, 1927 and 1928 conference titles.[7]

Year Undefeated team(s)[8] Record Notes
1922 North Carolina
Georgia Tech
Vanderbilt
Virginia Tech
Florida
5–0–0
4–0–0
3–0–0
3–0–0
2–0–0
This was the inaugural Southern Conference football season with 20 teams participating.
1923 Washington & Lee
Vanderbilt
Florida
Georgia Tech
4–0–1
3–0–1
1–0–2
1–0–4
1924 Alabama
Florida
5–0–0
2–0–1
1925 Alabama
Tulane
North Carolina
7–0–0
5–0–0
4–0–1
Alabama wins national championship.[9]
1926 Alabama 8–0–0 Alabama wins national championship.[9]
1927 Georgia Tech
Tennessee
Vanderbilt
North Carolina State
7–0–1
5–0–1
5–0–2
4–0–0
1928 Georgia Tech
Tennessee
7–0–0
6–0–1
Georgia Tech wins national championship.[7]
1929 Tulane
Tennessee
6–0–0
6–0–1
1930 Alabama
Tulane
8–0–0
5–0–0
Alabama wins national championship.[9]
1931 Tulane
Tennessee
8–0–0
6–0–1
1932 Tennessee
Auburn
LSU
7–0–1
6–0–1
4–0–0
Thirteen teams leave after this season to form the Southeastern Conference.[3]

Champions: 1933–present

In 1978 Division I football was split into two classifications: the Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly I-A) and Football Championship Subdivision (formerly I-AA). The Southern Conference moved to the FCS in 1982 where its members compete for the NCAA Division I Football Championship.

Year Champion(s)[8] Record Notes
1933 Duke 4–0–0
1934 Washington & Lee 4–0–0
1935 Duke 5–0–0
1936 Duke 7–0–0 The Citadel, Furman, George Washington, and Richmond join the Southern Conference.[10]
1937 Maryland 2–0–0
1938 Duke 5–0–0
1939 Duke 5–0–0
1940 Clemson 4–0–0
1941 Duke 5–0–0
1942 William & Mary 5–0–0
1943 Duke 4–0–0
1944 Duke 4–0–0
1945 Duke 4–0–0
1946 North Carolina 4–0–1
1947 William & Mary 7–1–0
1948 Clemson 5–0–0
1949 North Carolina 5–0–0
1950 Washington & Lee 6–0–0 West Virginia joins the Southern Conference.[10]
1951 Maryland
VMI
5–0–0
1952 Duke 5–0–0 Seven teams leave after this season to form the Atlantic Coast Conference.[4]
1953 West Virginia 4–0–0
1954 West Virginia 3–0–0
1955 West Virginia 4–0–0
1956 West Virginia 5–0–0
1957 VMI 6–0–0
1958 West Virginia 4–0–0 Washington & Lee leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
1959 VMI 6–0–1
1960 VMI 4–1–0
1961 The Citadel 5–1–0
1962 VMI 6–0–0
1963 Virginia Tech 5–0–0
1964 West Virginia 5–0–0 East Carolina joins the Southern Conference.[10]
1965 West Virginia 4–0–0 Virginia Tech leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
1966 East Carolina
William & Mary
4–1–1
1967 West Virginia 4–0–1
1968 Richmond 6–0–0 West Virginia leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
1969 Davidson
Richmond
5–1–0
1970 William & Mary 3–1–0 George Washington leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
1971 Richmond 5–1–0 Appalachian State joins the Southern Conference.[10]
1972 East Carolina 7–0–0
1973 East Carolina 7–0–0
1974 VMI 5–1–0
1975 Richmond 5–1–0
1976 East Carolina 4–1–0 Chattanooga, Marshall, and Western Carolina join the Southern Conference.[10]
East Carolina and Richmond leave the Southern Conference.[10]
1977 Chattanooga
VMI
4–1–0 William & Mary leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
1978 Furman
Chattanooga
4–1–0 Division I splits into I-A and I-AA subdivisions.[11]
East Tennessee State joins the Southern Conference.[10]
1979 Chattanooga 5–1–0
1980 Furman 7–0–0
1981 Furman 5–2–0
1982 Furman 6–1–0 Southern Conference drops from I-A to the I-AA classification in football.[2]
1983 Furman 6–0–1
1984 Chattanooga 5–1–0
1985 Furman 6–0–0
1986 Appalachian State 6–0–1
1987 Appalachian State 7–0–0
1988 Furman
Marshall
6–1–0 Furman wins NCAA Division I-AA national championship.[12]
1989 Furman 7–0–0
1990 Furman 6–1–0
1991 Appalachian State 6–1–0 Georgia Southern joins the Southern Conference.[10]
1992 The Citadel 6–1–0 Marshall wins NCAA Division I-AA national championship.[13]
1993 Georgia Southern 7–1–0
1994 Marshall 7–1–0
1995 Appalachian State 8–0–0
1996[14] Marshall 8–0 Marshall wins NCAA Division I-AA national championship.[13]
1997 Georgia Southern 7–1 Marshall leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
Wofford joins the Southern Conference.[10]
1998 Georgia Southern 8–0
1999 Furman
Georgia Southern
Appalachian State
7–1 Georgia Southern wins NCAA Division I-AA national championship.[15]
2000 Georgia Southern 7–1 Georgia Southern wins NCAA Division I-AA national championship.[15]
2001 Georgia Southern
Furman
7–1
2002 Georgia Southern 7–1
2003 Wofford 8–0 Elon joins the Southern Conference.[10]
VMI leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
2004 Furman
Georgia Southern
6–1
2005 Appalachian State 6–1 Appalachian State wins NCAA Division I-AA national championship.[16]
East Tennessee State leaves the Southern Conference.[10]
2006 Appalachian State 7–0 Appalachian State wins NCAA Division I FCS national championship.[17]
2007 Wofford
Appalachian State
5–2 Appalachian State wins NCAA Division I FCS national championship.[18]
2008 Appalachian State 8–0 Samford joins the Southern Conference.[10]
2009 Appalachian State 8–0

Championships by school

Current members

School Championships Years
Furman 12 1978, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1999, 2001, 2004
Appalachian State 10 1986, 1987, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
Georgia Southern 8 1993, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004
Chattanooga 4 1977, 1978, 1979, 1984
The Citadel 2 1961, 1992
Wofford 2 2003, 2007
Elon 0
Samford 0
Western Carolina 0

Former members

School Championships Years
Duke 10 1933, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1952
West Virginia 8 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1964, 1965, 1967
VMI 7 1951, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1974, 1977
East Carolina 4 1966, 1972, 1973, 1976
Richmond 4 1968, 1969, 1971, 1975
William & Mary 4 1942, 1947, 1966, 1970
Marshall 3 1988, 1994, 1996
Clemson 2 1940, 1948
Maryland 2 1937, 1951
North Carolina 2 1946, 1949
Washington & Lee 2 1934, 1950
Virginia Tech 1 1963
Davidson 1 1969

See also

References

  1. ^ Current members College of Charleston and UNC Greensboro do not sponsor football. Davidson plays football in the non-scholarship Pioneer Football League.
  2. ^ a b Southern Conference (2008-06-30). "The History of the Southern Conference". http://www.soconsports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=4000&KEY=&ATCLID=177772. Retrieved 2008-07-25.  
  3. ^ a b Southeastern Conference (2007). "About the Southeastern Conference (SEC)". http://www.secsports.com/index.php?s=&change_well_id=9993. Retrieved 2008-07-23.  
  4. ^ a b Atlantic Coast Conference (2008). "About the ACC". http://www.theacc.com/this-is/acc-this-is.html. Retrieved 2008-07-25.  
  5. ^ a b Southern Conference (2008-12-01). "Southern Conference Football: SoCon Playoff History". http://www.soconsports.com/pdf5/355095.pdf?ATCLID=1567928&SPSID=31927&SPID=1781&DB_OEM_ID=4000. Retrieved 2008-12-16.  
  6. ^ Southern Conference. "Football Record Book". 2005 Southern Conference Football: p. 144. http://www.soconsports.com/pdf6/20783.pdf?SPSID=37278&SPID=1781&ATCLID=201460&DB_OEM_ID=4000. Retrieved 2008-06-10.  
  7. ^ a b Georgia Tech Athletics. "Georgia Tech Titles". http://ramblinwreck.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/titles.html. Retrieved 2008-06-10.  
  8. ^ a b Southern Conference (2008-08-06). "Annual Leaders, History". 2008 Southern Conference Football Media Guide: pp. 168–171. http://www.soconsports.com/fls/4000/socon/files/08fbguide/annualleaders.pdf?SPSID=35576&SPID=1781&DB_OEM_ID=4000. Retrieved 2008-12-16.  
  9. ^ a b c Alabama Athletics. "Traditions: National Championships". http://www.rolltide.com/trads/national-championships.html. Retrieved 2008-07-25.  
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Southern Conference (2008-08-06). "About the Southern Conference". 2008 Southern Conference Football Media Guide: p. 8. http://www.soconsports.com/fls/4000/socon/files/08fbguide/abouthesocon.pdf?SPSID=35576&SPID=1781&DB_OEM_ID=4000. Retrieved 2008-12-16.  
  11. ^ On August 1, 1973 the NCAA's membership was divided into three legislative and competitive divisions at the first special convention ever held. All major schools were reclassified as Division I and other schools were divided into Division II and Division III. Roman numerals were chosen to be used rather than the Arabic 1, 2, 3. In 1978, Division I members voted to create subclassifications I-A, I-AA, and I-AAA for the sport of football. The major difference (at this point) besides sponsorship is the amount of scholarships allotted. I-A gets 85, I-AA gets 63, and I-AAA is for institutions that do not sponsor football. Only NCAA Division I is divided into subclassifications and only in the sport of football.
  12. ^ Willie T. Smith III (2008-11-14). "Furman to honor 1988 national champs". The Greenville News. http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20081114/SPORTS0103/811140319/1002. Retrieved 2008-12-16.  
  13. ^ a b "NCAA History: FCS History". NCAA. http://www.ncaa.com/history/football-fcs.html. Retrieved 2008-12-16.  
  14. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible.
  15. ^ a b Georgia Southern University Athletics (2006-03-06). "Championship Tradition". Georgia Southern Eagles. http://www.georgiasoutherneagles.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=18700&KEY=&ATCLID=1406031. Retrieved 2008-12-16.  
  16. ^ Appalachian Sports Information (2005-12-15). "Apps Win National Championship!". GoASU. http://www.goasu.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=104458&SPID=12811&DB_OEM_ID=21500&ATCLID=1542656. Retrieved 2008-10-02.  
  17. ^ Appalachian Sports Information (2006-12-15). "Richardson Goes For 4, Apps Get No. 2". GoASU. http://www.goasu.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=104458&SPID=12811&DB_OEM_ID=21500&ATCLID=1543906. Retrieved 2008-10-02.  
  18. ^ Appalachian Sports Information (2007-12-14). "Thrice is Nice: Apps Rout Delaware For Third-Straight National Title". GoASU. http://www.goasu.com/ViewArticle.dbml?SPSID=104458&SPID=12811&DB_OEM_ID=21500&ATCLID=1545029. Retrieved 2008-10-02.  

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