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List of United States Representatives from Indiana: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Indiana's Delegation to the United States House of Representatives during the 110th and 111th Congresses
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent

Since its statehood in 1816, the U.S. state of Indiana has sent congressional delegations to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. Each state elects two Senators statewide to serve for six years, and their elections are staggered to be held in two of every three even-numbered years—Indiana's Senate election years are to Classes I and III. Before the Seventeenth Amendment in 1913, Senators were elected by the Indiana General Assembly. Members of the House of Representatives are elected to two-year terms, one from each of Indiana's nine congressional districts. Before becoming a state, the Indiana Territory elected delegates at-large and sent three to Congress, but the territorial delegates were restricted from voting on legislation.

The longest-serving of any of Indiana's Congressmen is Senator Richard Lugar,[1] incumbent since 1977. The longest-serving House member is Lee H. Hamilton, who served from 1965 to 1999. There have been 342 people who have represented Indiana in Congress: 315 in the House, 27 in the Senate, and 17 in both houses, with an average term of seven years. Indiana has elected five women[2] and three African Americans[3] to Congress.

Contents

Key

Key to party COLORS and ABBREVIATIONS for Members of the U.S. Congress.
Adams (A) /
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J)
Democratic (D)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Free Soil (FS)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Opposition (O)
Republican (R)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent

United States Senate

Each state elects two Senators, and Indiana's come from classes I and III. Senators are elected by statewide popular vote every six years, though before the Seventeenth Amendment in 1913 Senators were chosen by the Indiana General Assembly. Recent class I Senate elections in Indiana were in 1992, 1998, 2004, and 2010; recent class III elections were in 1994, 2000, and 2006.

Of the forty-four men who have been Senators from Indiana, there have been three Democratic-Republicans, three Adams Republicans (including James Noble, who was both a Democratic-Republican and Adams Republican), two Whigs, one Unionist, twenty Democrats, and sixteen Republicans. Only 44 men have been Senators, though 46 terms have been served; David Turpie and William E. Jenner served nonconsecutive terms.

Indiana's current Senators are Republican Richard Lugar, first elected in 1976, and Democrat Evan Bayh, first elected in 1998. Although of different parties, both are popular in the state, having received 87% and 62% of the vote in their most recent elections, respectively.[4][5]

James Noble, Indiana's first Senator
Richard Lugar, the longest-serving Senator from Indiana, incumbent since 1977
Thomas A. Hendricks, two-term Representative, one-term Senator, and President of the Senate (Vice President), as well as Governor of Indiana
Schuyler Colfax, Seven-term Representative and Speaker of the House and later President of the Senate (Vice President)
Dan Quayle, two-term representative, one-term Senator, and President of the Senate (Vice President)
Julia Carson, the fifth woman and second African American to represent Indiana in Congress
Mike Pence, incumbent Representative from the 6th district since 2001, Republican Conference Chair in the 111th Congress
Class 1 Senators Congress Class 3 Senators
James Noble (D-R) 14th
(1815–1817)
Waller Taylor (D-R)
15th
(1817–1819)
16th
(1819–1821)
17th
(1821–1823)
18th
(1823–1825)
James Noble (Adams) 19th
(1825–1827)
William Hendricks (Adams)
20th
(1827–1829)
21st
(1829–1831)
Robert Hanna (Adams) 22nd
(1831–1833)
John Tipton (D-R)
23rd
(1833–1835)
24th
(1835–1837)
25th
(1837–1839)
Oliver H. Smith (W)
Albert S. White (W) 26th
(1839–1841)
27th
(1841–1843)
28th
(1843–1845)
Edward A. Hannegan (D)
Jesse D. Bright (D) 29th
(1845–1847)
30th
(1847–1849)
31st
(1849–1851)
James Whitcomb (D)
32nd
(1851–1853)
Charles W. Cathcart (D)
33rd
(1853–1855)
John Pettit (D)
34th
(1855–1857)
Graham N. Fitch (D)
35th
(1857–1859)
36th
(1859–1861)
Henry Smith Lane (R)
37th
(1861–1863)
Joseph A. Wright (U)
David Turpie (D)
Thomas A. Hendricks (D) 38th
(1863–1865)
39th
(1865–1867)
Oliver P. Morton (R)
40th
(1867–1869)
Daniel D. Pratt (R) 41st
(1869–1871)
42nd
(1871–1873)
43rd
(1873–1875)
Joseph E. McDonald (D) 44th
(1875–1877)
45th
(1877–1879)
Daniel W. Voorhees (D)
46th
(1879–1881)
Benjamin Harrison (R) 47th
(1881–1883)
48th
(1883–1885)
49th
(1885–1887)
David Turpie (D) 50th
(1887–1889)
51st
(1889–1891)
52nd
(1891–1893)
53rd
(1893–1895)
54th
(1895–1897)
55th
(1897–1899)
Charles W. Fairbanks (R)
Albert J. Beveridge (R) 56th
(1899–1901)
57th
(1901–1903)
58th
(1903–1905)
59th
(1905–1907)
James A. Hemenway (R)
60th
(1907–1909)
61st
(1909–1911)
Benjamin F. Shively (D)
John W. Kern (D) 62nd
(1911–1913)
63rd
(1913–1915)
64th
(1915–1917)
Thomas Taggart (D)
James E. Watson (R)
Harry S. New (R) 65th
(1917–1919)
66th
(1919–1921)
67th
(1921–1923)
Samuel M. Ralston (D) 68th
(1923–1925)
69th
(1925–1927)
Arthur Raymond Robinson (R)
70th
(1927–1929)
71st
(1929–1931)
72nd
(1931–1933)
73rd
(1933–1935)
Frederick Van Nuys (D)
Sherman Minton (D) 74th
(1935–1937)
75th
(1937–1939)
76th
(1939–1941)
Raymond E. Willis (R) 77th
(1941–1943)
78th
(1943–1945)
Samuel D. Jackson (D)
William E. Jenner (R)
79th
(1945–1947)
Homer E. Capehart (R)
William E. Jenner (R) 80th
(1947–1949)
81st
(1949–1951)
82nd
(1951–1953)
83rd
(1953–1955)
84th
(1955–1957)
85th
(1957–1959)
Vance Hartke (D) 86th
(1959–1961)
87th
(1961–1963)
88th
(1963–1965)
Birch Bayh (D)
89th
(1965–1967)
90th
(1967–1969)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)
93rd
(1973–1975)
94th
(1975–1977)
Richard Lugar (R) 95th
(1977–1979)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
Dan Quayle (R)
98th
(1983–1985)
99th
(1985–1987)
100th
(1987–1989)
101st
(1989–1991)
Dan Coats (R)
102nd
(1991–1993)
103rd
(1993–1995)
104th
(1995–1997)
105th
(1997–1999)
106th
(1999–2001)
Evan Bayh (D)
107th
(2001–2003)
108th
(2003–2005)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
111th
(2009–2011)

United States House of Representatives

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Delegates from Indiana Territory

Indiana Territory was formed on July 4, 1800, out of the Northwest Territory and consisted of present-day Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and parts of Michigan and Minnesota. Michigan Territory was split from the territory on June 30, 1805, and Illinois Territory followed on March 1, 1809, leaving Indiana Territory with its final borders except for a slight adjustment of its northern border when statehood was granted.[6] On December 11, 1816, Indiana was admitted to the Union as a state. The territorial delegates were allowed to serve on committees, debate, and submit legislation, but were not permitted to vote on bills.

Congress District
At-Large
9th
1805-1807
Benjamin Parke (Ind)
10th
1807-1809
Jesse B. Thomas
(D-R)
11th
1809-1811
Jonathan Jennings (Ind)
12th
1811-1813
13th
1813-1815
14th
1815–1817

Delegates from the State of Indiana

Members of the House of Representatives are elected every two years by popular vote within a congressional district. Indiana has nine congressional districts—this number is reapportioned based on the state's population, determined every ten years by a census. Indiana had a maximum representation of 13 congressmen from 1873 to 1933. Since 2003 Indiana has had nine representatives, five Democratic and four Republican, which was reduced from ten after the 2000 census. This gives Indiana the fourteenth-largest delegation; during the period from 1853 to 1873 the state had the fifth-largest delegation. Recent House elections in Indiana were in 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008.

The State of Indiana has been represented by 313 people in the House, including one who was previously a territorial delegate. Indiana's current House delegation includes Republicans Mark Souder, Steve Buyer, Dan Burton, and Mike Pence, and Democrats Pete Visclosky, Joe Donnelly, André Carson, Brad Ellsworth, and Baron Hill. All were reelected in 2008 with at least 55% of the vote.[7]

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th
14th
1815–1817
William Hendricks
(D-R)
15th
1817–1819
16th
1819–1821
17th
1821–1823
Jonathan Jennings
(D-R)
18th
1823–1825
William Prince
(D-R)
Jonathan Jennings
(J)
John Test
(J)
Jacob Call
(J)
19th
1825–1827
Ratliff Boon Jonathan Jennings
(A)
John Test
(A)
20th
1827–1829
Thomas H. Blake
(A)
Oliver H. Smith (Ind)
21st
1829–1831
Ratliff Boon
(J)
Jonathan Jennings
(Anti-J)
John Test
(Anti-J)
22nd
1831–1833
John Carr
(J)
Johnathan McCarty
(J)
23rd
1833–1835
John Ewing
(Anti-J)
John Carr
(J)
Amos Lane
(J)
Johnathan McCarty
(J)
George L. Kinnard
(J)
Edward A. Hannegan
(D)
24th
1835–1837
John W. Davis
(J)
Johnathan McCarty
(Anti-J)
25th
1837–1839
Ratliff Boon
(D)
John Ewing
(W)
William Graham
(W)
George H. Dunn
(W)
James Rariden
(W)
William Herod
(W)
Albert S. White
(W)
26th
1839–1841
George H. Proffit
(W)
John W. Davis
(D)
John Carr
(D)
Thomas Smith
(D)
William W. Wick
(D)
Tilghman A. Howard
(D)
Henry S. Lane
(W)
27th
1841–1843
Richard W. Thompson
(W)
Joseph L. White
(W)
James H. Cravens
(W)
Andrew Kennedy
(D)
David Wallace
(W)
28th
1843–1845
Robert D. Owen
(D)
Thomas J. Henley
(D)
Thomas Smith
(D)
Caleb B. Smith
(W)
William J. Brown
(D)
John W. Davis
(D)
Joseph A. Wright
(D)
John Pettit
(D)
Samuel C. Sample
(W)
Andrew Kennedy
(D)
29th
1845–1847
William W. Wick
(D)
Edward W. McGaughey
(W)
Charles W. Cathcart
(D)
30th
1847–1849
Elisha Embree
(W)
John L. Robinson
(D)
George G. Dunn
(W)
Richard W. Thompson
(W)
William Rockhill
(D)
31st
1849–1851
Nathaniel Albertson
(D)
Cyrus L. Dunham
(D)
George W. Julian (FS) William J. Brown
(D)
Willis A. Gorman
(D)
Edward W. McGaughey
(W)
Joseph E. McDonald
(D)
Graham N. Fitch
(D)
Andrew J. Harlan
(D)
32nd
1851–1853
James Lockhart
(D)
Samuel W. Parker
(W)
Thomas A. Hendricks
(D)
John G. Davis
(D)
Daniel Mace
(D)
Samuel Brenton
(W)
33rd
1853–1855
Smith Miller
(D)
William H. English
(D)
Cyrus L. Dunham
(D)
James H. Lane
(D)
Samuel W. Parker
(W)
Thomas A. Hendricks
(D)
Norman Eddy
(D)
Ebenezer M. Chamberlain
(D)
Andrew J. Harlan
(D)
34th
1855–1857
George G. Dunn
(O)
William Cumback
(O)
David P. Holloway
(O)
Lucien Barbour
(O)
Harvey D. Scott
(R)
Daniel Mace
(R)
Schuyler Colfax
(R)
Samuel Brenton
(O)
John U. Pettit
(R)
35th
1857–1859
James Lockhart
(D)
James Hughes
(D)
James B. Foley
(D)
David Kilgore
(R)
James M. Gregg
(D)
John G. Davis
(D)
James Wilson
(R)
Charles Case
(R)
William E. Niblack
(D)
36th
1859–1861
William M. Dunn
(R)
William S. Holman
(D)
Albert G. Porter
(R)
John G. Davis
(Anti-Lecompton Democrat)
37th
1861–1863
John Law
(D)
James A. Cravens
(D)
George W. Julian
(R)
Daniel W. Voorhees
(D)
Albert S. White
(R)
William Mitchell
(R)
John P.C. Shanks
(R)
38th
1863–1865
Henry W. Harrington
(D)
Ebenezer Dumont
(R)
Godlove Stein Orth
(R)
Joseph K. Edgerton
(D)
James F. McDowell
(D)
39th
1865–1867
William E. Niblack
(D)
Michael C. Kerr
(D)
Ralph Hill
(R)
John Hanson Farquhar
(R)
Joseph H. Defrees
(R)
Thomas N. Stilwell
(R)
Henry D. Washburn
(R)
40th
1867–1869
Morton C. Hunter
(R)
William S. Holman
(D)
John Coburn
(R)
William Williams
(R)
John P.C. Shanks
(R)
41st
1869–1871
William S. Holman
(D)
George W. Julian
(R)
John Coburn
(R)
Daniel W. Voorhees
(D)
Godlove Stein Orth
(R)
James N. Tyner
(R)
John P.C. Shanks
(R)
Jasper Packard
(R)
42nd
1871–1873
Jeremiah M. Wilson
(R)
Mahlon D. Manson
(D)
43rd
1873–1875
Simeon K. Wolfe
(D)
Morton C. Hunter
(R)
Thomas J. Cason
(R)
Henry B. Sayler
(R)
Godlove Stein Orth (At-large)
(R)
William Williams (At-large)
(R)
44th
1875–1877
Benoni S. Fuller
(D)
James D. Williams
(D)
Michael C. Kerr
(D)
Jeptha D. New
(D)
William S. Holman
(D)
Milton S. Robinson
(R)
Franklin Landers
(D)
Morton C. Hunter
(R)
Thomas J. Cason
(R)
William S. Haymond
(D)
James La Fayette Evans
(R)
Andrew H. Hamilton
(D)
John Harris Baker
(R)
Andrew Humphreys
(D)
Nathan T. Carr
(D)
45th
1877–1879
Thomas R. Cobb
(D)
George A. Bicknell
(D)
Leonidas Sexton
(R)
Thomas M. Browne
(R)
John Hanna
(R)
Michael D. White
(R)
William H. Calkins
(R)
46th
1879–1881
William Heilman
(R)
Jeptha D. New
(D)
William R. Myers
(D)
Gilbert De La Matyr
(GB)
Abraham J. Hostetler
(D)
Godlove Stein Orth
(R)
Calvin Cowgill
(R)
Walpole G. Colerick
(D)
47th
1881–1883
Strother M. Stockslager
(D)
William S. Holman
(D)
Courtland C. Matson
(D)
Thomas M. Browne
(R)
Stanton J. Peelle
(R)
Robert B.F. Peirce
(R)
Mark L. De Motte
(R)
George Washington Steele
(R)
William H. Calkins
(R)
Charles T. Doxey
(R)
48th
1883–1885
John J. Kleiner
(D)
John E. Lamb
(D)
Thomas B. Ward
(D)
Thomas Jefferson Wood
(D)
Robert Lowry
(D)
William E. English
(D)
Benjamin F. Shively
(Anti-Monopolist)
49th
1885–1887
Jonas G. Howard
(D)
William D. Bynum
(D)
James T. Johnston
(R)
William D. Owen
(R)
George Ford
(D)
50th
1887–1889
Alvin P. Hovey
(R)
John H. O'Neall
(D)
Joseph B. Cheadle
(R)
James B. White
(R)
Benjamin F. Shively
(D)
Francis B. Posey
(R)
51st
1889–1891
William F. Parrett
(D)
Jason B. Brown
(D)
George W. Cooper
(D)
Elijah V. Brookshire
(D)
Augustus N. Martin
(D)
Charles A.O. McClellan
(D)
52nd
1891–1893
John L. Bretz
(D)
Henry U. Johnson
(R)
Daniel W. Waugh
(R)
David H. Patton
(D)
53rd
1893–1895
Arthur H. Taylor
(D)
Thomas Hammond
(D)
William F. McNagny
(D)
Charles G. Conn
(D)
54th
1895–1897
James A. Hemenway
(R)
Alexander M. Hardy
(R)
Robert J. Tracewell
(R)
James E. Watson
(R)
Jesse Overstreet
(R)
Charles L. Henry
(R)
George W. Faris
(R)
Frank Hanly
(R)
Jethro A. Hatch
(R)
George Washington Steele
(R)
Jacob D. Leighty
(R)
Lemuel W. Royse
(R)
55th
1897–1899
Robert W. Miers
(D)
William T. Zenor
(D)
William S. Holman
(D)
George W. Faris
(R)
Jesse Overstreet
(R)
Charles L. Henry
(R)
Charles B. Landis
(R)
Edgar D. Crumpacker
(R)
James M. Robinson
(D)
Francis M. Griffith
(D)
56th
1899–1901
James E. Watson
(R)
George W. Cromer
(R)
Abraham L. Brick
(R)
57th
1901–1903
Elias S. Holliday
(R)
58th
1903–1905
Frederick Landis
(R)
59th
1905–1907
John H. Foster
(R)
John C. Chaney
(R)
Lincoln Dixon
(D)
Newton W. Gilbert
(R)
60th
1907–1909
William E. Cox
(D)
John A.M. Adair
(D)
George W. Rauch
(D)
Clarence C. Gilhams
(R)
61st
1909–1911
John W. Boehne
(D)
William A. Cullop
(D)
Ralph W. Moss
(D)
William O. Barnard
(R)
Charles A. Korbly
(D)
Martin A. Morrison
(D)
Cyrus Cline
(D)
Henry A. Barnhart
(D)
62nd
1911–1913
Finly H. Gray
(D)
63rd
1913–1915
Charles Lieb
(D)
John B. Peterson
(D)
64th
1915–1917
Merrill Moores
(R)
William R. Wood
(R)
65th
1917–1919
George K. Denton
(D)
Oscar E. Bland
(R)
Everett Sanders
(R)
Daniel Webster Comstock
(R)
Albert H. Vestal
(R)
Fred S. Purnell
(R)
Milton Kraus
(R)
Louis W. Fairfield
(R)
Richard N. Elliott
(R)
66th
1919–1921
Oscar R. Luhring
(R)
James W. Dunbar
(R)
John S. Benham
(R)
Andrew J. Hickey
(R)
67th
1921–1923
68th
1923–1925
William E. Wilson
(D)
Arthur H. Greenwood
(D)
Frank Gardner
(D)
Harry C. Canfield
(D)
Samuel E. Cook
(D)
69th
1925–1927
Harry E. Rowbottom
(R)
Noble J. Johnson
(R)
Ralph E. Updike
(R)
Albert R. Hall
(R)
David Hogg
(R)
70th
1927–1929
71st
1929–1931
James W. Dunbar
(R)
Louis Ludlow
(D)
72nd
1931–1933
John W. Boehne, Jr.
(D)
Eugene B. Crowe
(D)
Courtland C. Gillen
(D)
William Larrabee
(D)
Glenn Griswold
(D)
Samuel B. Pettengill
(D)
73rd
1933–1935
William T. Schulte
(D)
George R. Durgan
(D)
Samuel B. Pettengill
(D)
James I. Farley
(D)
Glenn Griswold
(D)
Virginia E. Jenckes
(D)
Arthur H. Greenwood
(D)
John W. Boehne, Jr.
(D)
Eugene B. Crowe
(D)
Finly H. Gray
(D)
William Larrabee
(D)
Louis Ludlow
(D)
74th
1935–1937
Charles A. Halleck
(R)
75th
1937–1939
76th
1939–1941
Robert A. Grant
(R)
George W. Gillie
(R)
Forest A. Harness
(R)
Noble J. Johnson
([R)
Gerald W. Landis
(R)
Raymond S. Springer
(R)
77th
1941–1943
Earl Wilson
(R)
78th
1943–1945
Ray J. Madden
(D)
Charles M. LaFollette
(R)
Louis Ludlow
(D)
79th
1945–1947
80th
1947–1949
E.A. Mitchell
(R)
81st
1949–1951
Thurman C. Crook
(D)
Edward H. Kruse
(D)
John R. Walsh
(D)
Cecil M. Harden
(R)
James E. Noland
(D)
Winfield K. Denton
(D)
Ralph Harvey
(R)
Andrew Jacobs
(D)
82nd
1951–1953
Shepard J. Crumpacker, Jr.
(R)
E. Ross Adair
(R)
John V. Beamer
(R)
William G. Bray
(R)
Charles B. Brownson
(R)
83rd
1953–1955
D. Bailey Merrill
(R)
84th
1955–1957
Winfield K. Denton
(D)
85th
1957–1959
F. Jay Nimtz
(R)
86th
1959–1961
John Brademas
(D)
J. Edward Roush
(D)
Fred Wampler
(D)
Earl Hogan
(D)
Randall S. Harmon
(D)
Joseph W. Barr
(D)
87th
1961–1963
Richard L. Roudebush
(R)
Earl Wilson
(R)
Ralph Harvey
(R)
Donald C. Bruce
(R)
88th
1963–1965
Winfield K. Denton
(D)
Ray J. Madden
(D)
89th
1965–1967
Ray J. Madden
(D)
Winfield K. Denton
(D)
Lee H. Hamilton
(D)
Andrew Jacobs, Jr.
(D)
90th
1967–1969
William G. Bray
(R)
John T. Myers
(R)
Roger H. Zion
(R)
Richard L. Roudebush
(R)
91st
1969–1971
Earl F. Landgrebe
(R)
Richard L. Roudebush
(R)
David W. Dennis
(R)
92nd
1971–1973
J. Edward Roush
(D)
Elwood Hillis
(R)
93rd
1973–1975
William H. Hudnut III
(R)
94th
1975–1977
Floyd Fithian
(D)
David W. Evans
(D)
Philip H. Hayes (D) Philip R. Sharp
(D)
Andrew Jacobs, Jr.
(D)
95th
1977–1979
Adam Benjamin
(D)
Dan Quayle
(R)
David L. Cornwell
(D)
96th
1979–1981
H. Joel Deckard
(R)
97th
1981–1983
John P. Hiler
(R)
Dan Coats
(R)
98th
1983–1985
Katie B. Hall
(D)
Philip R. Sharp
(D)
Dan Burton
(R)
Frank McCloskey
(D)
Andrew Jacobs, Jr.
(D)
99th
1985–1987
Pete Visclosky
(D)
100th
1987–1989
Jim Jontz
(D)
101st
1989–1991
Jill L. Long
(D)
102nd
1991–1993
Tim Roemer
(D)
103rd
1993–1995
Steve Buyer
(R)
104th
1995–1997
David M. McIntosh
(R)
Mark E. Souder
(R)
John N. Hostettler
(R)
105th
1997–1999
Edward A. Pease
(R)
Julia Carson
(D)
106th
1999–2001
Baron Hill
(D)
107th
2001–2003
Mike Pence
(R)
Brian D. Kerns
(R)
108th
2003–2005
Chris Chocola
(R)
Mark Souder
(R)
Steve Buyer
(R)
Dan Burton
(R)
Mike Pence
(R)
Julia Carson
(D)
109th
2005–2007
Michael Sodrel
(R)
110th
2007–2009
Joe Donnelly
(D)
André Carson
(D)
Brad Ellsworth
(D)
Baron Hill
(D)
111th
2009–2011
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th
District

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ "U.S. Senators from Indiana". United States Senate. http://www.senate.gov/pagelayout/senators/one_item_and_teasers/indiana.htm. Retrieved 2009-01-01.  
  2. ^ "Women Representatives and Senators by State". United States House of Representatives. http://womenincongress.house.gov/data/wic-by-state.html. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  3. ^ "Black-American Representatives and Senators by State and Territory, 1870–Present". Black Americans in Congress, 1870–2007. United States House of Representatives. http://baic.house.gov/historical-data/representatives-senators-by-state.html. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  4. ^ "United States Senator 2006". Indiana Secretary of State. November 6, 2007. http://www.in.gov/apps/sos/election/general/general2006?page=office&countyID=-1&officeID=4&districtID=514&candidate=. Retrieved 2009-01-14.  
  5. ^ "United States Senator 2004". Indiana Secretary of State. November 6, 2007. http://www.in.gov/apps/sos/election/general/general2004?page=office&countyID=-1&officeID=4&districtID=514&candidate=. Retrieved 2009-01-14.  
  6. ^ Funk, Arville L (1969, revised 1983). A Sketchbook of Indiana History. Rochester, Indiana: Christian Book Press. p. 188.  
  7. ^ "United States Representative". Indiana Secretary of State. December 15, 2008. http://www.in.gov/apps/sos/election/general/general2008?page=office&countyID=-1&officeID=5&districtID=937&candidate=. Retrieved 2009-01-14.  

External links


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