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The following is a list of national American radio and television networks and announcers that have broadcast World Series games over the years. It does not include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

Contents

Television

Television coverage of the World Series began in 1947. Since that time, seven different men have broadcast eight or more different World Series as a play-by-play or color commentator. They are (through 2009) Tim McCarver (20 times), Joe Buck (12), Mel Allen (11), Vin Scully (11), Curt Gowdy (11), Joe Garagiola (9), and Al Michaels (8).

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2010s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Field reporters Pregame hosts Pregame analysts Trophy presentation
2010 Fox[1] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Ken Rosenthal† and Mark Grace Chris Rose Eric Karros† and Mark Grace Chris Rose
  †  Expected announcer, subject to change.

2000s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Field reporters Pregame hosts Pregame analysts Trophy presentation
2009 Fox[2] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Ken Rosenthal and Mark Grace Chris Rose Eric Karros, Mark Grace, and Ozzie Guillén Chris Rose
2008 Fox[3] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Chris Myers and Ken Rosenthal Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy with
Mark Grace (Games 1, 2)
Eric Karros (Games 3, 4, 5)
Jeanne Zelasko
2007 Fox[4] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Chris Myers and Ken Rosenthal Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy with
Eric Byrnes and Eric Karros (Games 1, 2)
Joe Girardi and Mark Grace (Games 3, 4)
Jeanne Zelasko
2006 Fox[5] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Chris Myers and Ken Rosenthal Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy with
Eric Byrnes (Games 1, 2)
Joe Girardi (Games 3, 4, 5)
Jeanne Zelasko
2005 Fox[6] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Chris Myers Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy Jeanne Zelasko
2004 Fox[7] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Chris Myers Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy Jeanne Zelasko
2003 Fox[8] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Steve Lyons Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy Jeanne Zelasko
2002 Fox[9] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Steve Lyons Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy Jeanne Zelasko
2001 Fox[10] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Steve Lyons Jeanne Zelasko Kevin Kennedy Jeanne Zelasko
2000 Fox[11] Joe Buck Tim McCarver Bob Brenly Keith Olbermann Steve Lyons Keith Olbermann

Notes

  • Game 5 of the 2008 World Series on October 27 was postponed after the top of the sixth inning due to rain. When the game finally resumed on October 29, the start of the game was delayed by 15 minutes so that a 30 minute paid advertisement for U.S. Democratic Presidential candidate Barack Obama could be aired on Fox, CBS and NBC.[12]

1990s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Field reporters Pregame hosts Pregame analysts Trophy presentation
1999[13] NBC[14] Bob Costas Joe Morgan Jim Gray and Craig Sager Hannah Storm Barry Larkin and Curt Schilling Jim Gray
1998[15] Fox[16] Joe Buck Tim McCarver and Bob Brenly Chip Caray Steve Lyons Chip Caray
1997[17] NBC[18] Bob Costas Joe Morgan and Bob Uecker Jim Gray Hannah Storm and Keith Olbermann   Hannah Storm and Jim Gray
1996[19][20] Fox[21] Joe Buck Tim McCarver and Bob Brenly Chip Caray Steve Lyons and Dave Winfield Chip Caray
1995[22] The Baseball Network
(ABC; Games 1, 4 and 5) and
NBC; Games 2, 3 and 6)[23] [24]
Al Michaels (ABC)
Bob Costas (NBC)
Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver (ABC)
Joe Morgan and Bob Uecker (NBC)
Lesley Visser (ABC)
Jim Gray (NBC)
John Saunders (ABC)
Hannah Storm (NBC)
  Hannah Storm
1994 Cancelled due to 1994 strike.
1993[25] CBS[26] Sean McDonough Tim McCarver Lesley Visser and Jim Gray Pat O'Brien and Andrea Joyce   Tim McCarver
1992[27] CBS[28] [29] Sean McDonough Tim McCarver Jim Kaat and Lesley Visser Pat O'Brien   Jim Kaat
1991[30][31] CBS[32] Jack Buck Tim McCarver Jim Kaat, Lesley Visser and Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Tommy Lasorda Jim Kaat
1990[33] CBS[34] Jack Buck Tim McCarver Jim Kaat and Lesley Visser Pat O'Brien   Jim Kaat

Notes

  • The CBS telecasts of the 1992 and 1993 Series (both involving the Toronto Blue Jays) were simulcast on CTV in Canada. During this period, CTV produced their own pregame shows rather than simply taking the United States feed from CBS. Rod Black and Rob Faulds hosted CTV's pregame coverage, with CBS' Tim McCarver providing some additional pregame analysis.
    • At 30 years of age, CBS' Sean McDonough became the youngest man to call all nine innings and games of a World Series while serving as a full network television employee. Although Vin Scully and Al Michaels were several years younger when they called their first World Series, they were products of the then broadcasting policy of announcers representing the participating teams (a process that ended following the 1976 World Series). McDonough's record would subsequently be broken by Fox's Joe Buck, who at 27 years of age, called the 1996 World Series. Ironically, McDonough replaced Joe Buck's father, Jack, as CBS' lead play-by-play man.
  • The 1995 World Series was broadcast on two networks (ABC and NBC) so that they could recoup losses in the aftermath of the 1994 strike. The arrangement was a compromise from both networks, which chose to opt out of a six-year revenue sharing deal with Major League Baseball called "The Baseball Network." Prior to the strike, ABC was scheduled to broadcast the 1994 World Series and NBC was scheduled to televise the 1995 World Series. For 1995, ABC and NBC alternated games, with ABC scheduled to cover Games 1, 4, 5 and 7 while NBC covered Games 2, 3 and 6. Game 7 however, was not necessary.
    • Also during the 1995 World Series, NBC's Hannah Storm was the first woman to serve as solo host of a World Series, and the first to preside over a World Series trophy presentation.

1980s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Field reporters Pregame hosts Pregame analysts Trophy presentation
1989 ABC[35][36] Al Michaels Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver Gary Thorne and Joe Morgan Al Michaels Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver Gary Thorne
1988 NBC[37][38][39] Vin Scully Joe Garagiola Bob Costas and Marv Albert Bob Costas and Marv Albert Bob Costas
1987 ABC[40][41] Al Michaels[42] Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver Reggie Jackson and Gary Bender Al Michaels Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver Reggie Jackson
1986 NBC[43] Vin Scully Joe Garagiola Bob Costas and Marv Albert Bob Costas and Marv Albert Bob Costas
1985 ABC[44] Al Michaels[45] Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver Reggie Jackson Al Michaels Reggie Jackson Reggie Jackson
1984 NBC[46] Vin Scully Joe Garagiola Bob Costas and Len Berman Bob Costas and Len Berman Bob Costas
1983 ABC[47] Al Michaels Howard Cosell and Earl Weaver Reggie Jackson Howard Cosell Reggie Jackson Reggie Jackson
1982 NBC[48] Joe Garagiola and Dick Enberg Tony Kubek Bob Costas and Byron Day Dick Enberg Tom Seaver Bob Costas
1981 ABC[49] Keith Jackson (Games 1, 2, 6)
Al Michaels (Games 3, 4, 5)
Howard Cosell and Jim Palmer Bob Uecker Howard Cosell Bob Uecker Bob Uecker
1980 NBC[50] Joe Garagiola[51] Tony Kubek and Tom Seaver Merle Harmon Bryant Gumbel Bob Gibson Bryant Gumbel

Notes

  • Tom Seaver provided periodic commentary during the 1982 World Series, but was not in the booth. Dick Enberg and Joe Garagiola traded off play-by-play duties (just like what Tony Kubek had done with Garagiola in NBC's previous World Series broadcasts) for NBC's coverage in 1982. Garagiola called the first three and last three innings. Enberg meanwhile, hosted the pregame show and then, called the middle innings.
  • Earl Weaver was the #1 ABC analyst in 1983, but was also employed by the Baltimore Orioles as a consultant. At the time, ABC had a policy preventing an announcer who was employed by a team from working games involving that team. So whenever the Orioles were on the primary ABC game (ABC during this period, broadcast Monday night games), Weaver worked the backup game. This policy forced Weaver to resign from the Orioles' consulting position in October in order to be able to work the World Series for ABC.
  • The 1984 World Series was scheduled to start in the National League park. But Major League Baseball actually had a contingency plan to instead start the World Series in the American League park in the event that the Chicago Cubs won the National League Championship Series against the San Diego Padres. This would have allowed the Wrigley Field-hosted (i.e. daytime) games to be held over the weekend. In return, only one prime time game (Game 3 on Friday) would have been lost. Wrigley Field wouldn't have lights installed until four years later. To put things in proper perspective, had the Cubs advanced to the Series instead of the Padres, the Detroit Tigers would have hosted Games 1, 2, 6 and 7 (on Tuesday and Wednesday nights), while the Cubs would have hosted Games 3, 4 and 5 (on Friday, Saturday and Sunday), with all three games in Chicago starting no later than 1:30 p.m. Central Time.
  • 1985 marked the first time that all World Series games were aired in prime time. Since 1985 marked the first year of the League Championship Series having a best-of-seven format, Game 1 started on a Saturday. Tim McCarver was practically a last minute replacement for Howard Cosell[52] on ABC's coverage. Cosell was removed from the telecasts on the eve of the World Series (October 18), by order of Jim Spence and Roone Arledge (the then Vice President and President of ABC Sports respectively) after the excerpts from Cosell's book (I Never Played the Game), which criticized colleagues at ABC, first appeared in TV Guide.
  • Game 6 of the 1987 World Series (played on Saturday, October 24) is the last World Series game to date not[53] to be played in prime time (ironically, the game was played in the Metrodome even though it took place under artificial illumination all the same). The game started at 4 p.m. Eastern Time. Another weekend afternoon sixth game was planned for 1988, but since the World Series ended in five games, it was unnecessary.

1970s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Field reporters Pregame hosts Pregame analysts Trophy presentation
1979 ABC[55] Keith Jackson (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Al Michaels (Games 3, 4, 5)
Don Drysdale and Howard Cosell Bob Uecker Howard Cosell Bob Uecker Don Drysdale
1978 NBC Joe Garagiola Tony Kubek and Tom Seaver Curt Gowdy Curt Gowdy   Tony Kubek
1977 ABC[56] Keith Jackson Howard Cosell and Tom Seaver Bill White (Games 1, 2, 6)
Ross Porter (Games 3, 4, 5)
Bill White (Games 1, 2, 6)
Ross Porter (Games 3, 4, 5)
Bill White
1976 NBC[57] Joe Garagiola Marty Brennaman (Games 1, 2)
Phil Rizzuto (Games 3, 4)
Tony Kubek Dick Enberg   Tony Kubek
1975 NBC[58] Curt Gowdy (Games 1, 3, 5, 7)
Joe Garagiola (Games 2, 4, 6)
Ned Martin (Games 1, 2, 7)
Marty Brennaman (Games 3, 4, 5)
Dick Stockton (Game 6)
Tony Kubek Joe Garagiola   Tony Kubek and Marty Brennaman
1974 NBC[59] Curt Gowdy Vin Scully (Games 1, 2)
Monte Moore (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Joe Garagiola   Tony Kubek and Monte Moore
1973 NBC[60] Curt Gowdy Monte Moore (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Lindsey Nelson (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Joe Garagiola   Tony Kubek and Monte Moore
1972 NBC[61] Curt Gowdy Al Michaels[62] (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Monte Moore (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Joe Garagiola Sandy Koufax Tony Kubek and Monte Moore
1971 NBC[63] Curt Gowdy Chuck Thompson (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Bob Prince (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Joe Garagiola Sandy Koufax Bob Prince
1970 NBC[64] Curt Gowdy Jim McIntyre (Games 1, 2)
Chuck Thompson (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Joe Garagiola Sandy Koufax and Mickey Mantle Chuck Thompson

Notes

  • Game 4 of the 1971 World Series was the first World Series game to be aired in prime time.
  • 1977 marked the first time that the participating teams' local announcers were not featured[65] as booth announcers on the network telecast of a World Series.
    • 1977 was also the first year in which one announcer (in this case, ABC's Keith Jackson) provided all of the play-by-play for a World Series telecast. In previous years, the play-by-play announcers and color commentators had alternated roles during each game.
    • Also in 1977, Yankees announcer Bill White and Dodgers announcer Ross Porter alternated between pregame/postgame duties on ABC and calling the games for CBS Radio. White worked the ABC telecasts for the games in New York (including the clubhouse trophy presentation ceremony after Game 6) while Porter did likewise for the games in Los Angeles.
  • During ABC's coverage of the 1979 and 1981 World Series, Keith Jackson and Al Michaels took turns at play-by-play. Jackson did the games at the American League park while Michaels would come in for the games at the National League park. This arrangement was made in large part to work around Jackson's already busy schedule (which included being ABC's lead college football announcer). By 1983, Al Michaels would finally be promoted to the full-time spot of lead baseball play-by-play man for ABC[66].

1960s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Field reporters Pregame hosts Pregame analysts Trophy presentation
1969 NBC[67] Curt Gowdy Bill O’Donnell (Games 1, 2)
Lindsey Nelson (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Jim Simpson Sandy Koufax and Mickey Mantle Lindsey Nelson
1968 NBC[68] Curt Gowdy Harry Caray (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
George Kell (Games 3, 4, 5)
Tony Kubek Pee Wee Reese Sandy Koufax Ernie Harwell
1967 NBC[69] Curt Gowdy Ken Coleman (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Harry Caray (Games 3, 4, 5)
  Pee Wee Reese Sandy Koufax Harry Caray
1966 NBC[70] Curt Gowdy Vin Scully (Games 1, 2)
Chuck Thompson (Games 3, 4)
  Jim Simpson   Chuck Thompson
1965 NBC[71] Ray Scott Vin Scully   Bob Wolff Joe Garagiola Vin Scully
1964 NBC[72] Curt Gowdy Harry Caray   Bob Wolff Joe Garagiola Harry Caray
1963 NBC[73] Mel Allen Vin Scully   Bob Wolff Joe Garagiola Vin Scully
1962 NBC Mel Allen Russ Hodges   Bob Wolff Joe Garagiola Mel Allen
1961 NBC Mel Allen Joe Garagiola       Mel Allen
1960 NBC Mel Allen Bob Prince       Bob Prince

Notes

  • Before 1966, NBC typically paired the top announcers for the respective World Series teams to alternate play-by-play during each game's telecast. For example, if the Yankees played the Dodgers in the World Series, Mel Allen (representing the Yankees) would call half the game and Vin Scully (representing the Dodgers) would call the other half of the game. But in 1966, NBC wanted their regular network announcer, Curt Gowdy, to call most of the play-by-play at the expense of the top local announcers. So instead of calling half of every World Series game on television (as Vin Scully had done in 1953, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1963, and 1965) they would only get to call half of all home games on TV, providing color commentary while Gowdy called play-by-play for the remaining half of each game. The visiting teams' announcers would participate in the NBC Radio broadcasts. In broadcasts of Series-clinching (or potentially Series-clinching) games on both media, NBC would send the announcer for whichever team was ahead in the game to that team's clubhouse in the ninth inning in order to help cover the trophy presentation and conduct postgame interviews.

1950s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators
1959 NBC Vin Scully Jack Brickhouse
1958 NBC Mel Allen Curt Gowdy
1957 NBC Mel Allen Al Helfer
1956 NBC Mel Allen Vin Scully
1955 NBC Vin Scully Mel Allen
1954 NBC Russ Hodges Jack Brickhouse
1953 NBC Mel Allen Vin Scully
1952 NBC Mel Allen Red Barber
1951 NBC Jim Britt Russ Hodges
1950 NBC Jim Britt Jack Brickhouse

Notes

  • By 1950, World Series games could be seen in most of the country, but not all. 1950 also marked the first time that there was an exclusive network television broadcaster (NBC).
  • 1951 marked the first time that the World Series was televised coast to coast.

1940s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators
1949 NBC, CBS, DuMont and ABC Jim Britt
1948 NBC, CBS, DuMont and ABC Red Barber Van Patrick
1947 NBC (Games 1, 5)
CBS (Games 3, 4)
DuMont (Games 2, 6, 7)
Bob Stanton
Bob Edge
Bill Slater

Notes

  • By 1949, World Series games could now be seen east of Mississippi River. The games were open to all channels with a network affiliation.

Surviving telecasts

All telecasts of World Series games starting with 1975 (Reds-Red Sox) are accounted for and exist[74]. This is a full record of World Series telecasts prior to 1975 that are known to exist in whole or part:

  • 1952 (Yankees-Dodgers) - Only the complete telecasts of Games 6 and 7 are known to exist.
  • 1956 (Yankees-Dodgers) - The last three innings of Game 2 are known to exist. Also, all but the first inning of Don Larsen's perfect game (Game 5), which alas, can only be seen if you pay the owner of the kinescope $300 for a group showing at his place. (That Game 5 kinescope aired on the first night of the MLB Network on January 1, 2009, without the first inning.)
  • 1957 (YankeesBraves) - All of Game 3 except for a snip of Tony Kubek's second home run in the top 7th inning are known to exist. Also, most of the first six innings of Game 6 as well as Game 7 reportedly exists as well too.
  • 1961 (YankeesReds) - Only half hour segments of Game 3 (the first two innings), Game 4 (the 4th and 5th inning) and Game 5 (the opening and top of the 1st inning) are known to exist.
  • 1963 (YankeesDodgers) - Only Game 3 apparently exists in full.
  • 1965 (TwinsDodgers) - All seven games, preserved by the CBC on kinescope exist.
  • 1968 (TigersCardinals). All seven games, preserved by the CBC on kinescope exist.
  • 1969 (OriolesMets). Games 1 and 2 have been preserved by the CBC on kinescope. Meanwhile, Games 3-5 exist in their original color videotape quality from "truck feeds."
  • 1970 (OriolesReds). Games 1–4, preserved by the CBC on kinescope exist. Meanwhile, Game 5 exists in its original color videotape quality from the "truck feed."
  • 1971 (Orioles-Pirates). Games 1, 2, 6 and 7 exist in their complete forms. However, Games 3-5 only partially exist, while the existing telecast for Game 4 is almost all complete.
  • 1972 (A's-Reds) - Game 4 is the only complete game that exists along with almost all of Game 5, and a fair chunk of Game 2. There are only fragments that still exist for Games 1, 3, 6 and nothing of Game 7 that's known to exist.
  • 1973 (A's-Mets) - Game 1 is the only complete game with nothing missing that's known to exist. Game 2 is missing the last inning and a half (including both Mike Andrews plays). The existing telecast of Game 3 is missing the last inning. The existing telecast of Game 4 lasts from just the pregame show to the top of the 4th inning. The existing telecast of Game 5 just has the last two innings. Meanwhile, there's nothing to show for Game 6, and Game 7 cuts off with one out in the top of the 9th inning. Also, while the last inning and a half of Game 2 featuring the Mike Andrews plays is lost from the Major League Baseball/NBC copy, the plays themselves (totalling about 60 seconds of coverage) survived because after the World Series, NBC put together a 20 minute presentation tape narrated by Curt Gowdy to submit to the Peabody Awards in order to get consideration for an award for their coverage by the committee. The two Mike Andrews plays with Curt Gowdy and Tony Kubek's calls and analysis of them were used in that presentation tape. Meanwhile, the presentation tape exists in the Peabody vault, so there is a case where "reconstructing" a game in an incomplete format would require going to two different outlets.
  • 1974 (A's-Dodgers) - While Games 1-3 are complete, Games 4 and 5 are currently missing but might exist.

Radio

2010s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Pregame hosts Pregame analysts
2010 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Jon Sciambi Dave Campbell† and Peter Pascarelli†
  †  Expected announcer, subject to change.

2000s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Pregame hosts Pregame analysts
2009 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Jon Sciambi Dave Campbell and Peter Pascarelli
2008 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Jon Sciambi Dave Campbell and Peter Pascarelli
2007 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Jon Sciambi Dave Campbell and Peter Pascarelli
2006 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Dan Shulman Dave Campbell and Peter Pascarelli
2005 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Dan Shulman Dave Campbell
2004 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Dan Shulman Dave Campbell
2003 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Dan Shulman Dave Campbell
2002 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Dan Shulman Dave Campbell
2001 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Charley Steiner Dave Campbell
2000 ESPN Jon Miller Dave Campbell[75] Charley Steiner

1990s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Pregame hosts Pregame analysts
1999 ESPN Jon Miller Rick Sutcliffe Charley Steiner Dave Campbell
1998 ESPN Jon Miller Joe Morgan Charley Steiner Kevin Kennedy
1997 CBS Vin Scully Jeff Torborg John Rooney  
1996 CBS Vin Scully Jeff Torborg John Rooney  
1995 CBS Vin Scully Jeff Torborg John Rooney  
1993 CBS Vin Scully Johnny Bench John Rooney  
1992 CBS Vin Scully Johnny Bench John Rooney  
1991 CBS Vin Scully Johnny Bench John Rooney  
1990 CBS Vin Scully Johnny Bench John Rooney  

1980s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Pregame hosts
1989 CBS Jack Buck Johnny Bench John Rooney
1988 CBS Jack Buck Bill White John Rooney
1987 CBS Jack Buck Bill White John Rooney
1986 CBS Jack Buck Sparky Anderson Win Elliot
1985 CBS Jack Buck Sparky Anderson Win Elliot
1984 CBS Jack Buck Brent Musburger Win Elliot
1983 CBS Jack Buck Sparky Anderson Win Elliot
1982 CBS Vin Scully Sparky Anderson Win Elliot
1981 CBS Vin Scully Sparky Anderson Win Elliot
1980 CBS Vin Scully Sparky Anderson Win Elliot

Notes

  • 1984 marked the first time that teams' flagship radio stations were regularly permitted to produce their own local World Series radio broadcasts and air them live. In prior years, these stations were contractually required to carry the national radio networks' broadcasts (although they could produce re-created games with local announcers and air them after the Series had ended). The affiliate stations in the teams' radio networks continued to be obligated to carry the national broadcasts.
  • In 1985, KMOX, the St. Louis Cardinals' flagship station at the time, simulcast with CBS Radio's World Series coverage involving the Cardinals. That was mainly because Jack Buck had a lengthy career calling Cardinals games for KMOX to go along with his national work for CBS Radio.
  • In 1985 and 1986, CBS Radio designated the fifth inning of each Series game as a "Home Team Inning". A local announcer for the visiting team would appear on the network's broadcast in the top of the fifth, with the home team announcer doing so in the bottom of the fifth.

1970s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Pregame hosts
1979 CBS Vin Scully Sparky Anderson Win Elliot
1978 CBS Bill White and Ross Porter Win Elliot
1977 CBS Bill White (Games 1, 2, 5, 6) and Ross Porter (Games 3, 4, 5) Win Elliot
1976 CBS Bill White and Marty Brennaman Bill Sorrell
1975 NBC Joe Garagiola (Games 1, 3, 5, 7)
Curt Gowdy (Games 2, 4, 6)
Marty Brennaman (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Ned Martin (Games 3, 4, 5)
 
1974 NBC Jim Simpson Monte Moore (Games 1, 2)
Ross Porter (Games 3, 4, 5)
 
1973 NBC Jim Simpson Bob Murphy (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Monte Moore (Games 3, 4, 5)
 
1972 NBC Jim Simpson Monte Moore (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Al Michaels (Games 3, 4, 5)
 
1971 NBC Jim Simpson Bob Prince (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Bill O’Donnell (Games 3, 4, 5)
 
1970 NBC Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson (Games 1, 2)
Jim McIntyre (Games 3, 4, 5)
 

Notes

  • In 1977, Yankees announcer Bill White and Dodgers announcer Ross Porter alternated between pregame/postgame duties on ABC-TV and calling the games for CBS Radio. White worked the ABC telecasts for the games in New York (including the clubhouse trophy presentation ceremony after Game 6) while Porter likewise did for the games in Los Angeles.
  • 1979 was the first year in which one announcer (in this case, CBS Radio's Vin Scully) provided all of the play-by-play for a World Series radio broadcast. In prior years, the play-by-play announcers and color commentators had alternated roles during each game or between games.

1960s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Pregame hosts
1969 NBC Jim Simpson Ralph Kiner (Games 1, 2)
Bill O’Donnell (Games 3, 4, 5)
 
1968 NBC Pee Wee Reese Ernie Harwell (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Jack Buck (Games 3, 4, 5)
Joe Garagiola
1967 NBC Pee Wee Reese Harry Caray (Games 1, 2, 6, 7)
Ken Coleman (Games 3, 4, 5)
Gene Elston
1966 NBC Bob Prince Chuck Thompson (Games 1, 2)
Vin Scully (Games 3, 4)
 
1965 NBC By Saam Joe Garagiola  
1964 NBC Phil Rizzuto Joe Garagiola  
1963 NBC Ernie Harwell Joe Garagiola  
1962 NBC George Kell Joe Garagiola Lon Simmons
1961 NBC Bob Wolff Waite Hoyt  
1960 NBC Chuck Thompson Jack Quinlan  

Notes

  • Beginning in 1966 and continuing through 1975, a local announcer for the visiting team in each Series game would split play-by-play and color commentary with a neutral NBC Radio announcer. Prior to 1966 and going back to the dawn of the television era, Series radio broadcasts typically featured announcers from around the major leagues, with the regular announcers for both the home and visiting Series participants splitting play-by-play on NBC television. In broadcasts of Series-clinching (or potentially Series-clinching) games on both media, NBC would send the announcer for whichever team was ahead in the game to that team's clubhouse in the ninth inning in order to help cover the trophy presentation and conduct postgame interviews.

1950s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators
1959 NBC Mel Allen By Saam
1958 NBC Bob Wolff Earl Gillespie
1957 NBC Bob Neal Earl Gillespie and Bill Corum
1956 Mutual Bob Wolff Bob Neal
1955 Mutual Al Helfer Bob Neal
1954 Mutual Al Helfer Jimmy Dudley
1953 Mutual Al Helfer Gene Kelly
1952 Mutual Al Helfer Jack Brickhouse and Bill Corum
1951 Mutual Mel Allen Al Helfer
1950 Mutual Mel Allen Gene Kelly

1940s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators
1949 Mutual Mel Allen Red Barber
1948 Mutual Mel Allen Jim Britt
1947 Mutual Mel Allen Red Barber
1946 Mutual Jim Britt Arch McDonald and Bill Corum
1945 Mutual Bill Slater Al Helfer and Bill Corum
1944 Mutual Bill Slater Don Dunphy and Bill Corum
1943 Mutual Red Barber Bob Elson and Bill Corum
1942 Mutual Red Barber Mel Allen and Bill Corum
1941 Mutual Red Barber Bob Elson and Bill Corum
1940 Mutual Red Barber Bob Elson and Mel Allen

1930s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators
1939 Mutual Red Barber Bob Elson
1938[76] NBC Red
NBC Blue
CBS
Mutual
Red Barber and Tom Manning
Johnny O'Hara and George Higgins
John Harrington, Pat Flanagan, and France Laux
Bob Elson and Stan Lomax
George Hicks
Albert Rosewell
Bill Dyer and Mel Allen
Quin Ryan
1937 NBC
CBS
Mutual
Tom Manning
France Laux
Bob Elson
Red Barber and Warren Brown
Bill Dyer and Paul Douglas
Johnny O’Hara and David Driscoll
1936 NBC
CBS
Mutual
Tom Manning
France Laux
Bob Elson
Ty Tyson and Red Barber
Boake Carter and Warren Brown
Gabriel Heatter and Bill Dyer
1935 NBC
CBS
Mutual
Hal Totten
France Laux
Bob Elson
Ty Tyson and Graham McNamee
Truman Bradley and Jack Graney
Red Barber and Quin Ryan
1934 NBC
CBS
Tom Manning
France Laux
Ford Bond and Graham McNamee
Ted Husing and Pat Flanagan
1933 NBC
CBS
Hal Totten
Fred Hoey (Game 1) and France Laux (Games 2-5)
Graham McNamee and Tom Manning
Ted Husing
1932 NBC
CBS
Graham McNamee
Ted Husing
Tom Manning
Bob Elson and Pat Flanagan
1931 NBC
CBS
Graham McNamee
Ted Husing
Tom Manning and George Hicks

1930 NBC
CBS
Graham McNamee
Ted Husing

1920s

Year Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators
1929 NBC
CBS
Graham McNamee
Ted Husing
1928 NBC
CBS
Graham McNamee
Major White
Phillips Carlin

1927 NBC
CBS
Graham McNamee
Major White
Phillips Carlin

1926 Westinghouse Graham McNamee Phillips Carlin
1925 Westinghouse Graham McNamee
1924 Westinghouse Graham McNamee
1923 Westinghouse W. O. McGeehan (Games 1, 2, 3)
Graham McNamee (Games 3, 4, 5, 6)
1922 Westinghouse Grantland Rice W. O. McGeehan
1921 KDKA
WBZ
WJZ
Grantland Rice
Tommy Cowan

Notes

Sources

  1. ^ The New York Times - 2010 World Series on FOX
  2. ^ The New York Times - 2009 World Series on FOX
  3. ^ The New York Times - 2008 World Series on FOX
  4. ^ The New York Times - 2007 World Series on FOX
  5. ^ The New York Times - 2006 World Series on FOX
  6. ^ The New York Times - 2005 World Series on FOX
  7. ^ The New York Times - 2004 World Series on FOX
  8. ^ The New York Times - 2003 World Series on FOX
  9. ^ The New York Times - 2002 World Series on FOX
  10. ^ The New York Times - 2001 World Series on FOX
  11. ^ The New York Times - 2000 World Series on FOX
  12. ^ "Obama ad would delay start of World Series Game 6". Sporting News. 2008-10-16. http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=472908. Retrieved 2008-10-16. 
  13. ^ 1999 World Series | Game 4
  14. ^ The New York Times - 1999 World Series on NBC
  15. ^ 1998 World Series | Game 4
  16. ^ The New York Times - 1998 World Series on FOX
  17. ^ 1997 World Series | Game 7
  18. ^ The New York Times - 1997 World Series on NBC
  19. ^ 1996 World Series | Game 4
  20. ^ 1996 World Series | Game 6
  21. ^ The New York Times - 1996 World Series on FOX
  22. ^ 1995 World Series | Game 6
  23. ^ The New York Times - 1995 World Series on ABC
  24. ^ The New York Times - 1995 World Series on NBC
  25. ^ 1993 World Series | Game 6
  26. ^ The New York Times - 1993 World Series on CBS
  27. ^ 1992 World Series | Game 6
  28. ^ 1992 World Series | Game 6
  29. ^ The New York Times - 1992 World Series on CBS
  30. ^ 1991 World Series | Game 6
  31. ^ 1991 World Series | Game 7
  32. ^ The New York Times - 1991 World Series on CBS
  33. ^ 1990 World Series | Game 4
  34. ^ The New York Times - 1990 World Series on CBS
  35. ^ The New York Times - 1989 World Series on ABC
  36. ^ 1989 World Series home page at Hollywood.com
  37. ^ The New York Times - 1988 World Series on NBC
  38. ^ 1988 World Series home page at Hollywood.com
  39. ^ NBC's World Series telecasts showed it's still the best at covering the national pastime
  40. ^ The New York Times - 1987 World Series on ABC
  41. ^ Baseball Clinic From Abc
  42. ^ Bob Lundegaard, a TV critic for the Minneapolis Star Tribune , pulled a few screws from Michaels's hinges during last year's World Series. While Game 5 was being beamed from St. Louis, Lundegaard tuned a satellite dish so he could listen in on ABC's "pure" feed during commercial breaks. He quoted Michaels knocking his hotel accommodations, bad-mouthing the Series and talking about how much he longed for Monday Night Football . Michaels, who's so chummy with the dish audience that he sometimes tells them when he's going to the bathroom, complained that Lundegaard had blindsided him. "He made it sound like I'd been caught with my pants down," Michaels says. "It was an out-and-out attempt to make me look like a fool." After reading the story, Michaels phoned Lundegaard and screamed, "So, whatever I say is fair game, right?" "Sure," said Lundegaard. "Then listen in tonight, you true journalist. I'm going to make you a star." That night, during Game 6, Michaels said for the satellite feed, "Folks, those of you looking in on Telstar, there's a scum bag out there by the name of Bob Lundegaard...." ABC cut the sound. Later he said, "Since we're still on the dish, you jerk, Lundegaard, try to...." Again the audio went dead. Later still, when the network went to a commercial, Michaels said into his mike, "Let me go through Lundegaard's trash for syringes. Nobody straight could do that." Michaels didn't get much sympathy for his part in this outrageous tiff. "It came right back in my face," says Michaels, "like I've got thin skin and can't take criticism." Michaels also got into verbal fights at last year's Series with a reporter who had criticized the ABC broadcasting team for being biased in favor of the Cardinals. Two years ago he took on The Boston Globe's Jack Craig, who had placed Michaels slightly behind NBC's Bob Costas and Vin Scully in a column rating baseball announcers. "Al sent me the nastiest letter I've ever received from an announcer," says Craig. "Yet I'd actually praised him in the piece."
  43. ^ The New York Times - 1986 World Series on NBC
  44. ^ The New York Times - 1985 World Series on ABC
  45. ^ Al Michaels will do the play-by-play, with Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver offering commentary, and Michaels and Reggie Jackson will anchor the pre-game show.
  46. ^ The New York Times - 1984 World Series on NBC
  47. ^ The New York Times - 1983 World Series on ABC
  48. ^ The New York Times - 1982 World Series on NBC
  49. ^ The New York Times - 1981 World Series on ABC
  50. ^ The New York Times - 1980 World Series on NBC
  51. ^ The network's World Series announcers, Joe Garagiola, Tony Kubek and Tom Seaver, were also relatively restrained.
  52. ^ Cosell, who called Michaels Alfalfa, hasn't spoken to him since before the '85 World Series. He was removed from the ABC booth and replaced by Tim McCarver, partly because of his frosty relationship with Michaels. Says Michaels, "To me, it was the greatest trade in the history of broadcasting."
  53. ^ Day games don't rate in World Series
  54. ^ Michaels on 1989 WS earthquake
  55. ^ The New York Times - 1979 World Series on ABC
  56. ^ The New York Times - 1977 World Series on ABC
  57. ^ The New York Times - 1976 World Series on NBC
  58. ^ The New York Times - 1975 World Series on NBC
  59. ^ The New York Times - 1974 World Series on NBC
  60. ^ The New York Times - 1973 World Series on NBC
  61. ^ The New York Times - 1972 World Series on NBC
  62. ^ In 1972 the Big Red Machine obliged him by winning the pennant. Michaels helped call the Series for NBC.
  63. ^ The New York Times - 1971 World Series on NBC
  64. ^ The New York Times - 1970 World Series on NBC
  65. ^ OPINION: World Series misses home-team announcers on national broadcasts
  66. ^ After seven years at ABC he was still playing understudy to Keith Jackson, the smooth, folksy football commentator who was badly miscast doing baseball. One day in '83 Michaels stormed into the office of Jim Spence, then the No. 2 man at ABC Sports. "I read him the riot act," says Michaels. "Basically I said if they didn't pay attention to me, I was getting out." "I'll get back to you," Spence said. A month later Jackson was off the No. 1 baseball team, and Michaels was installed in his place.
  67. ^ The New York Times - 1969 World Series on NBC
  68. ^ The New York Times - 1968 World Series on NBC
  69. ^ The New York Times - 1967 World Series on NBC
  70. ^ The New York Times - 1966 World Series on NBC
  71. ^ The New York Times - 1965 World Series on NBC
  72. ^ The New York Times - 1964 World Series on NBC
  73. ^ The New York Times - 1963 World Series on NBC
  74. ^ Surviving World Series Telecasts
  75. ^ "The Way It Was, in the Booth, and the Way It Will Be". The New York Times. 2000-10-20. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9805E2D9133EF933A15753C1A9669C8B63&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss. Retrieved 2008-10-26. 
  76. ^ "357 stations to broadcast World Series". Chicago Tribune. 1938-10-05. 

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