List of awards and nominations received by William Gibson: Wikis

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William Gibson
awards and nominations
The head and shoulders of a middle-aged balding bespectacled white man, looking into the distance.
Portrait of Gibson in Paris on the occasion of his 60th birthday, May 17, 2008
Awards won 7
Nominations 35

William Gibson is an American-Canadian writer who has been called the "noir prophet" of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction.[1] Since first being published in the late 1970s, Gibson has written more than twenty short stories and nine critically acclaimed novels. His early works are bleak, noir near-future stories about the relationship between humans and technology – a "combination of lowlife and high tech".[2] Several of these garnered critical attention, receiving Hugo and Nebula Awards nominations in the categories of best short story and best novelette and featuring prominently in the annual Locus Awards reader's poll.

The themes, settings and characters developed in these stories culminated in his first novel, Neuromancer (1984), which proved to be the author's breakout work, achieving critical and commercial success and virtually initiating the cyberpunk literary genre.[3] It became the first novel to win the "triple crown"[3] of science fiction awards – the Nebula and the Hugo Awards for best novel, and the Philip K. Dick Award for paperback original,[4] an unprecedented achievement described by the Mail & Guardian as "the sci-fi writer's version of winning the Goncourt, Booker and Pulitzer prizes in the same year".[5] It also won the Ditmar and Seiun awards, received nominations for the year's "outstanding work" Aurora Award and the British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) award for best novel, topped the annual Science Fiction Chronicle poll and finished third in the standings for the 1985 John W. Campbell Award.

Much of Gibson's reputation remained associated with Neuromancer,[6] and though its sequels in the Sprawl trilogyCount Zero (1986) and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988) – also attracted Hugo and Nebula nominations for best novel, major award wins eluded the writer thereafter. "The Winter Market", a short story first published in November 1985, was well-received, garnering Hugo, Nebula, Aurora, and BSFA nominations and finished highly in the Locus, Interzone and Science Fiction Chronicle polls. Having completed the cyberpunk Sprawl trilogy, Gibson became a central figure in the steampunk subgenre by co-authoring the 1990 alternate history novel The Difference Engine, which was nominated for the Nebula, Campbell, Aurora and BSFA awards and featured in the Locus poll. His most recent novels – Pattern Recognition (2003) and Spook Country (2007) – put his work onto mainstream bestseller lists for the first time,[7] with the former being the first of Gibson's novels to be shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. Gibson was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2008.

Contents

Awards

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Hugo Award

The Hugo Awards are given every year for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. Gibson has won one award, the Hugo Award for Best Novel for his Neuromancer in 1985, and has been nominated on five other occasions.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1985 Neuromancer Hugo Award for Best Novel Won
1986 "Dogfight" Hugo Award for Best Novelette Nominated Co-authored with Michael Swanwick
1987 "The Winter Market" Hugo Award for Best Novelette Nominated
1987 Count Zero Hugo Award for Best Novel Nominated
1989 Mona Lisa Overdrive Hugo Award for Best Novel Nominated
1994 Virtual Light Hugo Award for Best Novel Nominated

Nebula Award

The Nebula Award is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction or fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years. Gibson's only Nebula Award was for Neuromancer in 1985, though he has received seven other nominations.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1982 "Johnny Mnemonic" Nebula Award for Best Short Story Nominated Originally published in 1981
1983 "Burning Chrome" Nebula Award for Best Novelette Nominated Originally published in 1982
1985 Neuromancer Nebula Award for Best Novel Won Originally published in 1984
1987 "The Winter Market" Nebula Award for Best Novelette Nominated Originally published in 1985
1986 "Dogfight" Nebula Award for Best Novelette Nominated Co-authored with Michael Swanwick; originally published in 1985
1987 Count Zero Nebula Award for Best Novel Nominated Originally published in 1985
1989 Mona Lisa Overdrive Nebula Award for Best Novel Nominated Originally published in 1988
1992 The Difference Engine Nebula Award for Best Novel Nominated Co-authored with Bruce Sterling; originally published in 1990

John W. Campbell Memorial Award

The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel is awarded by a jury to an outstanding novel published during the previous year. Gibson has been nominated twice, but has yet to win.[9]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1985 Neuromancer John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 3rd
1992 The Difference Engine John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 2nd Co-authored with Bruce Sterling

Philip K. Dick Award

The Philip K. Dick Award is awarded to the best original science fiction paperback published each year in the United States.[10] Neuromancer won the award in 1984,[11] and Gibson sat on the jury of the 1986 award.[12]

Arthur C. Clarke Award

The Arthur C. Clarke Award is a British award given for the best science fiction novel first published in the United Kingdom during the previous year. Gibson's Pattern Recognition (2003) was shortlisted for the award in 2004.[13]

Aurora Award

The Prix Aurora Awards are granted annually by the Canadian SF and Fantasy Association for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy. Gibson won the best Long-form English work award twice, and received four other nominations.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1985 Neuromancer Outstanding work Nominated
1986 "The Winter Market" Short-form, English Nominated
1989 Mona Lisa Overdrive Long-form, English Won
1992 The Difference Engine Long-form, English Nominated Co-authored with Bruce Sterling
1994 Virtual Light Long-form, English Nominated
1995 Virtual Light Long-form, English Won

BSFA Awards

The British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) annually presents four awards, traditionally on the basis of a vote of its members. Gibson has been nominated for an award on six occasions,[8][14] though he has yet to win.[15]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1985 Neuromancer Novel Nominated
1987 "The Winter Market" Short story Nominated
1987 Count Zero Novel Nominated
1991 The Difference Engine Novel Nominated Co-authored with Bruce Sterling
2004 Pattern Recognition Novel Nominated
2007 Spook Country Novel Nominated

Ditmar Award

The Ditmar Award is granted at the Australian National Science Fiction Convention (the "Natcon") to recognize achievement in Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror and its fandom. Gibson has been nominated for two awards, winning for Neuromancer in 1985.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1985 Neuromancer International novel Won
1989 Mona Lisa Overdrive International novel Nominated

Seiun Award

The Seiun Award is awarded for the best science fiction published in Japan during the preceding year, as decided by a vote attendees of the Japan Science Fiction Convention. Gibson won once, for Neuromancer in 1987, and received a second nomination for All Tomorrow's Parties in 2001.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1987 Neuromancer Best Foreign Language Novel of the Year Won
2001 All Tomorrow's Parties Best Foreign Language Novel of the Year Nominated

Italia Awards

Conferred by vote at the annual Italcon, the Italia Awards have been granted since 1972. Gibson's Virtual Light was nominated in the inaugural "International novel" category in 1995, finishing second.[8]

Southeastern SF Awards

The Southeastern SF Awards recognising achievements in fantasy, horror and science fiction by authors connected to the Southeastern United States, were established in 2002. Gibson, a native of South Carolina who grew up in Virginia, was recognized in 2004, when Pattern Recognition was shortlisted for the Southeastern SF Achievement Award.[8]

Polls

Locus

The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus magazine's annual reader's poll. Though none of Gibson's works have claimed first position, they have polled twenty-four times.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1981 "The Gernsback Continuum" Short story 24th
1982 "Hinterlands" Short story 21st
1982 "Johnny Mnemonic" Novelette 20th
1983 "Burning Chrome" Novelette 7th
1984 "Red Star, Winter Orbit" Novelette 19th Co-authored with Bruce Sterling
1985 Neuromancer Locus Award for Best First Novel 2nd
1985 Neuromancer Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 8th
1985 "New Rose Hotel" Short story 19th
1985 "Dogfight" Short novelette 5th Co-authored with Michael Swanwick
1987 Burning Chrome Collection 2nd
1987 Count Zero Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 3rd
1987 "The Winter Market" Novelette 4th
1989 Mona Lisa Overdrive Novel 2nd
1991 The Difference Engine Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 8th Co-authored with Bruce Sterling
1992 "Skinner's Room" Short story 15th
1992 The Difference Engine Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 20th Co-authored with Bruce Sterling
1994 Virtual Light Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 4th
1997 Idoru Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 6th
1998 Neuromancer All-time science fiction novel (before 1990) 15th
1999 "Burning Chrome" All-time novelette 13th (tie)
1999 Burning Chrome All-time collection 18th (tie)
2000 All Tomorrow's Parties Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 15th
2004 Pattern Recognition Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 2nd
2008 Spook Country Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 2nd

Interzone

The annual Interzone Poll is conducted by readers of the British science fiction magazine Interzone. Gibson's short story "The Winter Market" polled third in the fiction category in 1987.[8]

Science Fiction Chronicle

The semiprozine Science Fiction Chronicle of Andrew I. Porter conducted a reader's poll from 1982 to 1998. Gibson claimed first place once, for Neuromancer in 1985, and finished in the top three on four other occasions.[8]

Year Nominated work Category Result Notes
1983 "Burning Chrome" Novelette 3rd
1985 Neuromancer Novel 1st
1986 "Dogfight" Novelette 2nd Co-authored with Michael Swanwick
1987 "The Winter Market" Novelette 2nd (tie)
1987 Count Zero Novel 2nd

Career honours

In addition to the recognition of his individual works, Gibson has been accorded several career honours. In a 1989 Interzone poll to determine the "All-time best SF author", Gibson finished 19th, while in the Locus All-Time Poll taken a decade later, he was tied at 42nd for the "All time short fiction writer". He received nominations for a "Life achievement" Southeastern SF Achievement Award in 2005 and 2006, and was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2008.[8]

Related pages

References

  1. ^ Bennie, Angela (September 7, 2007). "A reality stranger than fiction". Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. http://www.smh.com.au/news/books/a-reality-stranger-than-fiction/2007/09/06/1188783376158.html. Retrieved March 15, 2009.  
  2. ^ Gibson, William; Bruce Sterling (1986). "Introduction". Burning Chrome. New York: Harper Collins. ISBN 0060539828. OCLC 51342671.  
  3. ^ a b McCaffery, Larry. "An Interview with William Gibson". Storming the Reality Studio: a casebook of cyberpunk and postmodern science fiction. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press. pp. 263–285. ISBN 9780822311683. OCLC 23384573. http://project.cyberpunk.ru/idb/gibson_interview.html. Retrieved November 5, 2007.  
  4. ^ Cheng, Alastair. "77. Neuromancer (1984)". The LRC 100: Canada's Most Important Books. Literary Review of Canada. http://lrc.reviewcanada.ca/index.php?page=71---80. Retrieved September 9, 2007.  
  5. ^ Walker, Martin (September 3, 1996). "Blade Runner on electro-steroids". Mail & Guardian Online. M&G Media. http://www.brmovie.com/Articles/Guardian_WG_1995.htm. Retrieved November 28, 2009.  
  6. ^ Johnston, Antony (August 1999). "William Gibson: All Tomorrow’s Parties : Waiting For The Man". Spike Magazine. http://www.spikemagazine.com/0899williamgibson.php. Retrieved October 14, 2007.  
  7. ^ Hirst, Christopher (May 10, 2003). "Books: Hardbacks". The Independent. Independent News and Media. Archived from the original on October 13, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20071013205201/http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_20030510/ai_n12684401. Retrieved July 8, 2007.  
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Kelly, Mark R. (2008). "Locus index to Science Fiction Awards: William Gibson". Locusmag.com. Locus Publications. http://www.locusmag.com/SFAwards/Db/NomLit52.html. Retrieved March 15, 2009.  
  9. ^ "The John W. Campbell Memorial Award". Center for the Study of Science Fiction. University of Kansas. November 16, 2009. http://www2.ku.edu/~sfcenter/campbell.htm. Retrieved December 27, 2009.  
  10. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: About the Philip K. Dick Award". Locusmag.com. Locus Publications. http://www.locusmag.com/SFAwards/Db/Pkd.html. Retrieved March 23, 2009.  
  11. ^ Bancroft, Colette (August 21, 2007). "Sci-fi writer William Gibson finds inspiration in the present". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. St. Petersburg Times (Hearst Corporation). http://www.seattlepi.com/books/328475_gibson22.html. Retrieved September 23, 2009.  
  12. ^ Kelly, Mark R. (2008). "The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Judges and Jurors". Locusmag.com. Locus Publications. http://www.locusmag.com/SFAwards/Db/Judge7.html#1945. Retrieved March 15, 2009.  
  13. ^ Sourbut, Elizabeth (May 8, 2004). "Mall of the imagination". New Scientist (Reed Business Information). http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg18224465.900-mall-of-the-imagination.html. Retrieved December 27, 2009.  
  14. ^ "BSFA Awards: 2007 Nominations". bsfa.co.uk. British Science Fiction Association. http://www.bsfa.co.uk/Awards/BSFAAwards2007Nominations/tabid/68/language/en-GB/Default.aspx. Retrieved September 23, 2009.  
  15. ^ "BSFA Awards: Past Awards". bsfa.co.uk. British Science Fiction Association. http://www.bsfa.co.uk/Awards/BSFAAwardsPastAwards/tabid/70/language/en-GB/Default.aspx. Retrieved September 23, 2009.  

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