List of birds: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bird taxonomy
Neornithes 


Struthioniformes*



Tinamiformes





Neoaves


 Galloanserae 

Anseriformes



Galliformes





Neoaves 


Podicipediformes



Phoenicopteriformes




Phaethontidae



Pteroclidiformes



Mesitornithidae



Columbiformes




Eurypygidae



Rhynochetidae



 Cypselomorphae 

Caprimulgiformes




Apodiformes



Aegotheliformes





Opisthocomidae




Gruiformes



Cuculiformes



"Waterbirds"





Charadriiformes



"Landbirds"




"Waterbirds" 

Gaviiformes





Sphenisciformes



Procellariiformes





Ciconiiformes



Pelecaniformes





"Landbirds" 

Accipitriformes



Strigiformes



Coliiformes




Leptosomatidae



Trogoniformes




Bucerotiformes




Coraciiformes



Piciformes






Cariamidae




Falconidae




Psittaciformes



Passeriformes





A phylogenetic tree of the modern birds, based on a recent study[1]. Note the polytomies.
This is a list relating to extant species of birds. For a list of birds in history and fiction, see List of historical and fictional birds. For extinct birds, please see Extinct birds, Prehistoric birds and Fossil birds.

This page lists living orders and families of birds. The links below should then lead to family accounts and hence to individual species.

Taxonomy is very fluid in the age of DNA analysis, so comments are made where appropriate, and all numbers are approximate. In particular see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy for a very different classification.

Contents

Paleognathae

The flightless and mostly giant Struthioniformes lack a keeled sternum and are collectively known as ratites. Together with the Tinamiformes, they form the Paleognathae or "old jaws", one of the two evolutionary superorders.

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Struthioniformes

Mainly southern hemisphere; 12 species; sometimes all families are raised to order rank.

Tinamiformes

South America; 45 species.

Neognathae

Nearly all living birds belong to the superorder of Neognathae or "new jaws". With their keels, unlike the ratites, they are known as carinatae. The passerines alone account for well over 5000 species.

Anseriformes

Worldwide; 150 species.

Galliformes

Worldwide; 250 species.

Podicipediformes

Worldwide; 19 species; sometimes grouped with Phoenicopteriformes.

Phoenicopteriformes

Worldwide; 6 species.

Pteroclidiformes

Africa, Europe, Asia; 16 species; sometimes grouped with Columbiformes.

Columbiformes

Worldwide; 300 species.

Caprimulgiformes

Worldwide; 90 species.

Apodiformes

Worldwide; 400 species.

Aegotheliformes

Oceania; 10 species; sometimes grouped with Apodiformes.

Cuculiformes

Worldwide; 150 species.

Gruiformes

Worldwide; 200 species.

Gaviiformes

North America, Eurasia; 5 species.

Sphenisciformes

Antarctic and southern waters; 17 species.

Procellariiformes

Pan-oceanic; 120 species.

Ciconiiformes

Worldwide; 100 species.

Pelecaniformes

Worldwide; 68 species.

Charadriiformes

Worldwide; 350 species; sometimes considered part of the Ciconiiformes order under the Sibley-Ahlquist system.

Falconiformes

Worldwide; 260 species; sometimes all families except Falconidae, or all families except Falconidae and Cathartidae, are separated as Accipitriformes.

Strigiformes

Worldwide; 130 species.

Coliiformes

Sub-Saharan Africa; 6 species.

Trogoniformes

Sub-Saharan Africa, Americas, Asia; 35 species.

Coraciiformes

Worldwide; 200 species; sometimes Bucerotidae, Upupidae and Phoeniculidae are separated as Bucerotiformes.

Piciformes

Worldwide except Australasia; 400 species.

Psittaciformes

Pan-tropical, southern temperate zones; 330 species.

Passeriformes

Worldwide; 5000 species.

See also

For regions smaller than continents see:

References

  1. ^ A Phylogenomic Study of Birds Reveals Their Evolutionary History. Shannon J. Hackett, et al. Science 320, 1763 (2008).

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