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Diplomatic missions in Hamburg. Dark blue active and light blue former missions, as of July 2009.
Hamburg

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Hamburg



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A stand alone, two storey red brick building with several trees surrounding it
Consulate-general of the Republic of Indonesia
Parts of a withe building with a tree in front. The entrance is on a higher level with columns.
Honorary consulate of Jordan
A multi-storey red brick building with a storefront.
Office building at Gänsemarkt in the Neustadt quarter with the Panamanian consulate-general
A two storey white building with an attic. Two flagpoles, one with the flag of Spain, the other with the European flag, are in front of the building.
Consulate-general of Spain

Hamburg's history of diplomatic missions started in the 16th century, in that time the city was a free imperial city. The first missions from the city of Hamburg to other countries date back to the Middle Ages and Hamburg's participation in the Hanseatic league. At first representatives were called Oldermänner or by the English term "Courtmaster", later in the style of the common "Consul".[1] As of 2009, there were 100 consulates in Hamburg, ranked the third-largest in the world (after New York City and Hong Kong) and largest in Europe.[2] The consuls are official representatives of the government of a foreign state to the city of Hamburg, normally acting to assist the citizens of the consul's own country, to represent his country's interests, and to facilitate trade and friendship between the people of Hamburg and the country of which he is a representative. There are several consuls providing assistance with bureaucratic issues to both, the citizens of the consul's own country travelling or living abroad, and to Hamburg's citizens (and often Northern Germany, e.g. the Consulate-general of Japan[3]), who wish to trade with the consul's country (e.g. information about visa or customs duties). Consuls are also patrons of fairs or exhibitions, like US Consul General Karen E. Johnson was the patron of the Youth Exchange Fair in September 2009.[4]

In the 19th century Hamburg was an important location for diplomatic missions, because of the prestige gained by the Hanseatic cities and the importance as a centre of commerce. The trade and independent striving of the Hanseatic cities of Bremen, Lübeck and Hamburg for the "common German service" were even named in the Westphalian peace treaty in 1648, and the Hanseatic and later Hamburgian consuls during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries were also representatives for "all fellow Germans".[5] The Senate of Hamburg often opened a consulate to cities and countries, if a trade post existed, esp. by shipping. There were very few cities like Dresden—then capital of Saxony—without a sea port. Treaties were signed, if a proper unsalaried candidate for the position had been found.[6] Article 23 of the treaty between the Hanseatic cities and Guatemala signed on 25 June 1847 decreed the bilateral deployment of consuls, or article 9 of the treaty with Sardinia ruled the judicial authority of the Hanseatic consuls.[7] Even in 20th century, the importance of Hamburg is emphasized by the position of the port of Hamburg in the world's ranking. In 2007, it was one of the busiest container ports of the world.[8] In the segment of transshipment Hamburg was in a leading position in 2004. In 2005, the port handled more containers with destination or provenance in Germany as Bremerhaven and Rotterdam combined.[9]

The first mission established, was from Austria (then Habsburg Monarchy) in 1570, the Slovak Republic's consulate was the 100th in 2006,[2] and the last one was the consulate of the Palau (as of 2009), former German colony from 1899 until 1918/19.[10][11] The first missions visiting Hamburg often were trade missions of foreign countries. During the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648) constant diplomatic missions were needed, most of those envoys or residents were Hamburg citizens—only large and most influential states sent own nationals.[12] Some countries sent their missions from 1815 – 1886, at this time Hamburg was an independent and sovereign state of the German Confederation.[13]

Legend

  •       Consulate-general
  •       Consulate
  •       Honorary consulate-general
  •       Honorary consulate

Contents



(As of July 2009)
Mission Date[A] Address[B] Notes Rank[C]
 Argentina 1835 Mittelweg 141,
20148 Hamburg
2009 –
 Austria 1570 Alsterufer 37,
20354 Hamburg
In 2009 the Foreign Ministry stated its intention to close the mission in 2010.[14] 2006 –
 Bangladesh 1975 Billhorner Kanalstraße 69,
20539 Hamburg
2005 –
 Belgium 1832 Langenhorner Markt 9,
22415 Hamburg
1997 –
 Bolivia 1855 Heimhuder Straße 33 a,
20148 Hamburg
1997 –
 Botswana 1971 Berzeliusstraße 45,
22113 Hamburg
2007 –
 Bulgaria 1993 Alstertor 15,
20095 Hamburg
1997 –
 Cape Verde 1986 Deichstrasse 9,
20459 Hamburg
2003 –
 Czech 1992 Feldbrunnenstrasse 72,
20148 Hamburg
2003 –
 Chile 1835 Harvestehuder Weg 7,
20148 Hamburg
2008 –
 China 1921 Elbchaussee 268,
22605 Hamburg
2003 –
 Colombia 1845 Wendenstr. 29,
20097 Hamburg
2003 –
 Costa Rica 1850 Meyerhofstraße 8,
22609 Hamburg
1983 –
 Croatia 1994 Hermannstraße 16,
20095 Hamburg
Doyen (senior member of the consulate corps) 2003 –
 Cyprus 1990 Rothenbaumchaussee 3,
20148 Hamburg
 Denmark 1648 Hermannstraße 16,
20095 Hamburg
2007 –
 Dominican Republic 1857 Heimhuder Straße 77,
20148 Hamburg
2005 –
 Ecuador 1846 Rothenbaumchaussee 221,
20149 Hamburg
2008 –
 El Salvador 1867 Raboisen 32,
20095 Hamburg
2004 –
 Egypt 1976 Mittelweg 183,
20148 Hamburg
2008 –
 Estonia 1993 Badestraße 38,
20148 Hamburg
1993 –
 France 1579 Heimhuder Straße 55,
20148 Hamburg
2006 –
 Finland 1921 Esplanade 41,
20354 Hamburg
2005 –
 Ghana 1963 Lübecker Str. 1,
22087 Hamburg
1998 –
 Greece 1836 Neue ABC-Straße 10,
20354 Hamburg
2005 –
 Guatemala 1960 Esplanade 6,
20354 Hamburg
2003 –
 Guinea 1990 Rehwechsel 28,
21224 Rosengarten
1993 –
 Haiti 1951 Tinsdaler Kirchenweg 275 a,
22559 Hamburg
2005 –
 Honduras 1869 An der Alster 21,
20099 Hamburg
2007 –
 Hungary 1992 Alsterufer 45,
20354 Hamburg
1995 –
 Iceland 1949 Gertrudenstrasse 3,
20095 Hamburg
2005 –
 India 1954 Graumannsweg 57,
22087 Hamburg
2007 –
 Indonesia 1956 Bebelallee 15,
22299 Hamburg
2007 –
 Iran 1858 Bebelallee 18,
22299 Hamburg
2006 –
 Ireland 1962 Feldbrunnenstraße 43,
20148 Hamburg
1991 –
 Italy 1816 Feldbrunnenstraße 54,
20148 Hamburg
2009 –
 Jamaica 1969 Ballindamm 1,
20095 Hamburg
1993 –
 Japan 1883 Rathausmarkt 5,
20095 Hamburg
2008 –
 Jordan 1964 Rothenbaumchaussee 95,
20148 Hamburg
2005 –
 Kazakhstan 1994 Rothenbaumchaussee 40,
20148 Hamburg
2007 –
 Kenya 1992 Rathausstraße 6,
20095 Hamburg
1992 –
 Kiribati 1990 Neumühlen 13,
22763 Hamburg
1990 –
 Republic of Korea 1886 Kaiser-Wilhelm-Str. 9,
20355 Hamburg
2008 –
 Kyrgyzstan 1996 Am Sandtorkai 77,
20457 Hamburg
1996 –
 Latvia 1925 Neuer Wall 72,
20354 Hamburg
1997 –
 Lithuania 1994 Brodschrangen 4,
20457 Hamburg
1998 –
 Luxembourg 1921 An der Alster 9,
20099 Hamburg
2007 –
 Macedonia 2006 Adenauerallee 25,
20097 Hamburg
2006 –
 Madagascar 1963 Habichtstraße 41,
22305 Hamburg
1999 –
 Malawi 1969 Elbchaussee 419,
22609 Hamburg
1987 –
 Malaysia 1959 Kajen 2,
20459 Hamburg
1996 –
 Malta 1970 Große Elbstrasse 145 F,
22767 Hamburg
2002 –
 Mexico 1829 Kleine Reichenstraße 1,
20457 Hamburg
2005 –
 Moldova 2000 Haldesdorferstraße 46,
22179 Hamburg
2000 –
 Monaco 1954 Neuer Jungfernstieg 20,
20354 Hamburg
1998 –
 Morocco 1960 In de Bargen 4,
22587 Hamburg
2007 –
 Mozambique 2007 Große Elbstraße 138,
22767 Hamburg
2007 –
 Namibia 1997 An der Alster 82,
20099 Hamburg
1997 –
 Nepal 1998 Jungfernstieg 44,
20354 Hamburg
1998 –
 New Zealand 1992 Domstraße 19,
20095 Hamburg
2007 –
 Nicaragua 1859 Max-Brauer-Allee 20,
22765 Hamburg
1997 –
 Niger 1970 Fischertwiete 2,
20095 Hamburg
1988 –
 Norway 1906 ABC-Straße 19,
20354 Hamburg
The mission of Norway was one of the first missions after the independence of Norway in 1905. In 2006 Mette-Marit re-opened the consulate-general of Norway, it had been closed in 2003.[15] 2006 –
 Palau 2008 Rutschbahn 6,
20146 Hamburg
2008 –
 Pakistan 1962 Max-Brauer-Allee 45,
22765 Hamburg
2008 –
 Panama 1905 Gänsemarkt 44,
20354 Hamburg
2004 –
 Papua New Guinea 1990 Mattentwiete 5,
20457 Hamburg
1990 –
 Paraguay 1872 Elbchaussee 439,
22609 Hamburg
2007 –
 Peru 1843 Blumenstraße 28,
22301 Hamburg
2004 –
 Poland 1921 Gründgensstraße 20,
22309 Hamburg
2008 –
 Portugal 1658 Büschstr. 7 – I.,
20354 Hamburg
2005 –
 Romania 1883 Oberaltenallee 20a ,
22081 Hamburg
2006 –
 Russia 1709 Am Feenteich 20,
22085 Hamburg
2005 –
 Saint Kitts and Nevis 2008 Van-der-Smissen-Straße 2,
22767 Hamburg
2008 –
 Samoa 2008 Oderfelder Straße 23,
20149 Hamburg
2008 –
 Senegal 1965 Frankenstrasse 3,
20097 Hamburg
2001 –
 Serbia 2004 Harvestehuder Weg 101,
20149 Hamburg
 Seychelles 1984 Billwerder Neuer Deich 14,
20539 Hamburg
1997 –
 Slovakia 1995 Jungfernstieg 38,
20354 Hamburg
2006 –
 Slovenia 1994 Ballindamm 8,
20095 Hamburg
1994 –
 South Africa 1896 Palmaille 45,
22767 Hamburg
2003 –
 Spain 1626 Mittelweg 37,
20148 Hamburg
2006 –
 Sri Lanka 1966 Pickhuben 9,
20457 Hamburg
1974 –
 Sweden 1630 Ditmar-Koel-Strasse 36,
20459 Hamburg
Former consulate-general closed in 2008.[16] 2008 –
 Switzerland 1846 Rathausmarkt 5,
20095 Hamburg
The mission was the second Swiss mission to German territory (in 1835 a mission was established in Leipzig). In 1958 Switzerland upgraded the Hamburg consulate to a consulate-general. In 2008 it was announced by the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs to close the mission in 2009[17] 2005 –
 Syria 1992 Osakaallee 11,
20457 Hamburg
1992 –
 Tanzania 1992 Franz Rabe Strasse 23,
25474 Bönningstedt
1992 –
 Thailand 1881 An der Alster 85,
20099 Hamburg
1990 –
 Tonga 1983 Habichtstraße 41,
22305 Hamburg
2001 –
 Tuvalu 1985 An der Alster 45,
20099 Hamburg
2003 –
 Trinidad and Tobago 1998 Raboisen 3,
20095 Hamburg
1998 –
 Tunisia 1972 Lübecker Straße 1,
22087 Hamburg
2005 –
 Turkey 1844 Tesdorpfstraße 18,
20148 Hamburg
 Uganda 1987 Dornkamp 18,
22869 Schenefeld
1987 –
 Ukraine 2002 Mundsburger Damm 1,
22087 Hamburg
2007 –
 Uruguay 1838 Hochallee 76,
20149 Hamburg
2009 –
 UK 1632 Neuer Jungfernstieg 20,
20354 Hamburg
Former consulate-general closed in 2006.[18][19] 2007 –
 USA 1793 Alsterufer 27/28,
20354 Hamburg
Consulate General of the United States in Hamburg 2007 –
 Venezuela 1833 Rothenbaumchaussee 30,
20148 Hamburg
 Yemen 2006 Martinistr. 18,
20251 Hamburg
2006 –
 Zambia 2004 Neuer Wall 19,
20354 Hamburg
2004 –
 Brazil Closed[20]
 Canada Closed[21]
 Liberia 1952 (re-opening)[22] In the 1920s, Momolu Massaquoi was the first African consulate in Europe.[23] Closed
 Netherlands Closed on 1 July 2009[24]
 Philippines 1958[25] Closed[26]
 FR Yugoslavia Closed[27]

See also

Notes

  1. ^^ Date of establishment
  2. ^^ Sorted by postal code
  3. ^^ Protocolic rank of the consul in Hamburg, depends on the type of the mission and the term in office. (As of July 2009)

References

  1. ^ Beneke, p. 1
  2. ^ a b "Konsulate in Hamburg" (in German). Senatskanzlei. http://www.hamburg.de/konsulate/. Retrieved 2009-09-01.  
  3. ^ "Über uns > Zuständigkeitsbereiche" (in German, Japanese selectable). Japanisches Generalkonsulat Hamburg. http://www.hamburg.emb-japan.go.jp/relaunch/deutsch/ueber_uns/zustaendigkeitsbereiche.htm. Retrieved 2009-10-22.  
  4. ^ "Schüleraustausch-Messe am 19. September 2009" (in German). BürgerStiftung Region Ahrensburg. http://www.schueleraustausch-messe.de/messe-am-1992009.html. Retrieved 2009-10-22.  
  5. ^ Beneke, pp. 10–11
  6. ^ Beneke, p. 8
  7. ^ Beneke, pp. 13–14
  8. ^ Staff. "Containerumschlag in TEU (Twenty Foot Equivalent Units)" (in German). Hafen Hamburg. http://translations.hafen-hamburg.de/mafo/mafo.php. Retrieved 2009-10-23.  
  9. ^ "Nachrichten › Hamburger Hafen top" (in German). VOCA media. 2008-02-25. http://cargoforum.de/News/article/sid=246.html. Retrieved 2009-10-23.  
  10. ^ "Background Note: Palau". U.S. Department of State. August 2009. http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/1840.htm. Retrieved 2009-09-02.  
  11. ^ "Statistische Angaben zu den deutschen Kolonien" (in German). Deutsches Historisches Museum. http://www.dhm.de/lemo/html/kaiserreich/aussenpolitik/kolonien2/index.html. Retrieved 2009-09-02.  
  12. ^ Lorenzen-Schmidt, Klaus-Joachim (2005). "Konsulate". Hamburg Lexikon (3 ed.). Ellert&Richter. pp. 282. ISBN 3831901791.   (German)
  13. ^ Hundt, Michael (2005). "Souveränität". Hamburg Lexikon (3 ed.). Ellert&Richter. pp. 439–440. ISBN 3831901791.   (German)
  14. ^ "Vertretungen im Ausland umstrukturiert" (in German). Wiener Zeitung. 2009-05-07. http://www.wienerzeitung.at/DesktopDefault.aspx?TabID=3856&Alias=wzo&cob=412608. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  15. ^ "Generalkonsulat eröffnet: Königlicher Glanz: Mette-Marit in Hamburg" (in German). Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. 2006-10-18. http://www.faz.net/s/Rub501F42F1AA064C4CB17DF1C38AC00196/Doc~E5D0CDE19EBF64EDE8E464643E8CFD1F0~ATpl~Ecommon~Scontent.html. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  16. ^ "Schwedisches Konsulat in Hamburg schließt" (in German). Norddeutscher Rundfunk. 2008-03-07. http://www1.ndr.de/nachrichten/hamburg/konsulate2.html. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  17. ^ Jean-Michel Berthoud (2008-09-19). "Aus für älteste Schweizer Vertretung in Deutschland" (in German). swissinfo.ch. http://www.swissinfo.ch/ger/politik_schweiz/fuenfte_schweiz/Aus_fuer_aelteste_Schweizer_Vertretung_in_Deutschland.html?siteSect=1681&sid=9746297&cKey=1221856486000&ty=st. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  18. ^ Sebastian Knauer (2007-01-30). "Round-the-Clock Security for Skeleton Staff". Der Spiegel. http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,462976,00.html. Retrieved 2009-09-02.  
  19. ^ "Britisches Generalkonsulat in Hamburg endgültig geschlossen" (in German). Norddeutscher Rundfunk. 2006-09-29. http://www1.ndr.de/nachrichten/hamburg/hh3290.html. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  20. ^ Mordecai Paldiel (2007). Diplomat heroes of the Holocaust. Jersy City, NY: Ktav. p. 26. ISBN 9780881259094. "Aracy de Carvalho Guimarães Rosa"  
  21. ^ "Büro für deutsch-russischen Jugendaustausch ab Herbst in Hamburg" (in German). ngo-online.de. 2005-04-12. http://www.ngo-online.de/ganze_nachricht.php?Nr=10856. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  22. ^ William D. Coale (1978), "West German transnationals in tropical Africa: the case of Liberia and the Bong Mining Company", Forschungsberichte, Afrika-Studienstelle (Ifo-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung) (Ifo-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung) Band 59: p. 41, ISBN 9783803901651  
  23. ^ "The Life Journey of Momolu Massaquoi, First African Diplomat". Daily Observer. 2009-08-24. http://www.liberianobserver.com/node/807. Retrieved 2009-09-02.  
  24. ^ "Ade, Frau Antje" (in German). fr-online.de. 2009-06-17. http://www.fr-online.de/frankfurt_und_hessen/nachrichten/frankfurt/1800636_Hohe-Diplomatie-Ade-Frau-Antje.html. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  
  25. ^ Hermógenes E. Bacareza (1980), A history of Philippine-German relations, University of California, p. 157  
  26. ^ "Frankfurters. Hamburgers, and bonners". Manila Bulletin. 2009-08-30. http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/218383/frankfurters-hamburgers-and-bonners. Retrieved 2009-09-02.  
  27. ^ "An 'Us vs. Them' Mantra Raises the Balkan Fever". The New York Times. 1997-01-11. http://www.nytimes.com/1997/01/11/world/an-us-vs-them-mantra-raises-the-balkan-fever.html. Retrieved 2009-09-02.  
Main

Further reading

  • Ahrens, Michael (2003). Das britische Generalkonsulat am Harvesterhuder Weg: Handel, Kultur und Diplomatie - 100 Jahre Geschichte einer Alster-Villa English:  The British Consulate-General in Harvestehuder Weg. Hamburg: Britisches Generalkonsulat Hamburg. OCLC 249041882.  

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