List of members of the Basketball Hall of Fame: Wikis

  
  

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The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, located in Springfield, Massachusetts, honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches, referees, and other major contributors to the sport. It is named after Dr. James Naismith, who conceived the sport in 1891; he was inducted into the Hall as a contributor in 1959.[1]

To be considered for induction, nominees must meet certain prerequisites. Players must have been retired for at least five years before becoming eligible. Referees and coaches must have either been retired for at least five years, or, if they are still active, have coached or officiated for at least 25 years at high-school-level programs or higher. Those being considered for induction as contributors may be inducted at any time; the Hall of Fame and its committees evaluate whether contributions are significant enough for the nominee to be inducted as a contributor.[2] Teams are also inducted at the committees' discretion.

As of induction of the Class of 2009 on September 11, 2009, the Hall has selected 287 individuals (136 players, 79 coaches, 3 as both players and coaches, 56 as contributors, and 13 referees) and 6 teams.

Contents

Members

Coaches

As part of the inaugural class of 1959, three coaches were inducted (Forrest C. "Phog" Allen, Henry Clifford Carlson and Walter E. Meanwell); in total, eighty-two coaches have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. Eight of the inducted coaches were born outside the United States: Cesare Rubini (Italy, 1994), Aleksandr J. Gomelsky (Soviet Union, now Russia, 1995), Antonio Díaz-Miguel (Spain, 1997), Aleksandar "Aza" Nikolić (Yugoslavia, now Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1998), Geno Auriemma (Italy, 2006), Alessandro "Sandro" Gamba (Italy, 2006), Mirko Novosel (Yugoslavia, now Croatia, 2007), and Pedro Ferrándiz (Spain, 2007). Six of them have won the Euroleague championships. Seven of the inducted coaches are women: L. Margaret Wade (1985), Jody Conradt (1998), Pat Head Summitt (2000), Sandra Kay Yow (2002), Sue Gunter (2005), Cathy Rush (2008), and C. Vivian Stringer (2009). Three coaches have also been inducted as players: John Wooden, Bill Sharman, and Lenny Wilkens. Jerry Sloan and Stringer are the most recent coaches to have been inducted.

Most of the inductees have been college head coaches, twenty-six of whom have led a team to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) championship. Fourteen inductees have coached in the National Basketball Association (NBA); all of them except Alvin F. Julian have won an NBA championship. Larry Brown is the only inductee to coach both a college basketball team and a professional basketball team to a title, having coached the Kansas Jayhawks (NCAA) and the Detroit Pistons (NBA) to championships. Donald L. "Don" Haskins, inducted in 1997, was the head coach of the 1966 Texas Western basketball team, which was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007. Twelve inductees have won an Olympic medal coaching a men's national team to a top-three finish in the Olympic tournament. Eight coached the U.S. national team, while the other four coached foreign national teams. Two inductees, Kay Yow and Van Chancellor, have led a women's national team to a top-three finish in the Olympics, both winning gold medals with the USA, and a third, Auriemma, served as an assistant coach for a gold-medal winning USA team.

Contributors

For a person to be inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor, they must have made "significant contributions to the game of basketball".[2] Of the inaugural Hall of Fame class of 1959, seven individuals were inducted as contributors, including James Naismith, the inventor of basketball. All former NBA commissioners (Maurice Podoloff, Walter Kennedy and Larry O'Brien) have been inducted. Nine inductees have won the John Bunn Award, awarded by the Hall annually to a significant contributor: John Bunn (its inaugural recipient), Walter Kennedy, Clifford Fagan, Eddie Gottlieb, Daniel Biasone, Larry O'Brien, Dave Gavitt and Meadowlark Lemon. Two inductees are women: Senda Berenson Abbott and Bertha Teague (both inducted in 1985). Six individuals inducted in this category were born outside the United States—Naismith and Pete Newell in Canada, Biasone and Renato William Jones in Italy, Ferenc Hepp in modern-day Hungary (Austria–Hungary at his birth in 1909), and Borislav Stanković in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina (the Kingdom of Yugoslavia at his birth in 1925). William Davidson and Dick Vitale (both inducted in 2008) are the most recent to have been selected to the Hall of Fame as contributors. In total, 56 individuals have been inducted as contributors.

A black-and-white of a man with a mustache wearing a suit and a tie
Luther Gulick, inducted in 1959
A black-and-white of a man wearing a suit and a tie looking to the right side
Amos Alonzo Stagg, inducted in 1959
A black-and-white of a man wearing glasses and a suit. He sits inside a house with a hand placed on a table with a pile of papers.
Larry O'Brien, inducted in 1991
Year Inductee Achievements Ref.
1959 Gulick, Luther H.Luther H. Gulick Head of Physical Education at School for Christian Workers (1887–1900); Chairman of Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) Basketball Committee (1895–1905) [3]
1959 Hickox, Edward J. "Ed"Edward J. "Ed" Hickox Represented New England in Olympic Trials (Springfield College, 1936); five New England championships (Springfield College); Board of Directors of Basketball Hall of Fame (1959–66); National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) historian (1944–66) [4]
1959 Morgan, RalphRalph Morgan Founded Collegiate Basketball Rules Committee (1905); Secretary and Treasurer of Rules Committee (1905–31); Founded Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League (now the Ivy League) (1910); Secretary and Treasurer of Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League (1910–31) [5]
1959 Naismith, JamesJames Naismith Physical education instructor (Springfield College, 1890–95); invented the game of "basket ball," (now called basketball); developed basketball's original 13 rules; physical education professor (Kansas, 1917–37) [6]
1959 Olsen, Harold G.Harold G. Olsen Big Ten Championships (Ohio State; 1925, 1933, 1939, 1944, 1946); helped found NCAA tournament (1939); Chairman of NCAA Rules Committee; first Coach of Basketball Association of America's (BAA) Chicago Stags (1946–49) [7]
1959 Stagg, Amos AlonzoAmos Alonzo Stagg Played in the first public basketball game at Springfield and scored the team's only basket in a 5–1 loss; 7 Big Ten titles during late 19th century and early 20th century (Chicago) [8]
1959 Tower, OswaldOswald Tower Member of Basketball Rules Committee (1910–60); Editor of Official Basketball Guide (1915–60); official rules interpreter (1915–60); coach of Wilbraham (MA) Academy (1907–10) [9]
1960 Porter, Henry V.Henry V. Porter First representative for high schools on the National Basketball Rules Committee; pioneered use of motion pictures to study proper playing techniques; published the first high school rule book (1936); published the first state high school association publication, The Illinois Athlete [10]
1961 O'Brien, John J.John J. O'Brien President, Metropolitan Basketball League (1922–28, 1931–33); President and chairman of the board, American Basketball League (1928–31, 1933–53); dedicated to the advancement of professional basketball in the East; supporter of referees and one of the first league administrators to begin fining players [11]
1961 Schabinger, Arthur A.Arthur A. Schabinger Officiated in the Missouri Valley Conference, Big Eight, Kansas and Missouri Conferences, and the national AAU championships; one of the founders of the NABC; author of the NABC's Constitution and By-Laws, and designer of its emblem; promoted the adoption of molded basketball by colleges [12]
1961 Trester, Arthur L.Arthur L. Trester Commissioner of Indiana High School Athletic Association (1922–44); coach and referee in Indiana; known as the "Czar" of Indiana high school athletics [13]
1962 Morgenweck, FrankFrank Morgenweck Operated and coached professional teams in 14 cities in the National, New England, Western Massachusetts, Hudson River, Central, New York State, Inter-State, Metropolitan, Eastern States, and American leagues (1901–32); National League championship (Camden, 1904); Metropolitan League championships (Patterson, 1923; Kingston, 1928) [14]
1962 St. John, Lynn W.Lynn W. St. John Lobbied for formal national and international rules for amateur basketball for three decades; served on NCAA Rules Committee with James Naismith (1912–37); Chairman, Rules Committee (1919–37); Member, Olympic Basketball Committee (1936) [15]
1963 Reid, William A.William A. Reid Director of athletics, University of Detroit (1919); Director of athletics, Colgate University (1936–55); President, Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference (ECAC) (1944–45); Director ECAC Executive Council (1945–49) [16]
1964 Bunn, John W.John W. Bunn Coached Stanford to Pacific Coast Conference championships (1936–38); Helms Athletic Foundation Championship (Stanford, 1937); Chairman, Basketball Hall of Fame (1949–63); Editor, College Guide and Official Rules Interpreter (1959–60) [17]
1964 Irish, Edward S. "Ned"Edward S. "Ned" Irish Basketball director, Madison Square Garden (1934); integral in formation of BAA (1946); founded the New York Knicks (1946); President, New York Knicks (1946–74) [18]
1964 Jones, R. WilliamR. William Jones Co-founded the International Amateur Basketball Federation (FIBA) (1932); organized men's and women's European Championships (1935–63); organized men's and women's World Championships (1950–63); organized Olympic Basketball Tournament (1936–60) [19]
1965 Brown, Walter A.Walter A. Brown President of the Boston Garden (1937–64); founded the Boston Celtics (1946); spearheaded the formation of the NBA (1949); President of the International Ice Federation [20]
1965 Hinkle, Paul D. "Tony"Paul D. "Tony" Hinkle Helms Athletic Foundation Championship (Butler, 1924, 1929); President, NABC (1954–55); Chairman, Rules Committee of the National Basketball Committee of U.S. and Canada; coached the Great Lakes Navy teams during World War II [21]
1965 Mokray, William G. "Bill"William G. "Bill" Mokray Started concept of college basketball doubleheaders at the Boston Garden (1944–45); first Chairman of the Hall of Fame Honors Committee (1959–64); owned the world's largest basketball library; considered the number-one authority on the game's history [22]
1968 Bee, Clair F.Clair F. Bee Influential in the development of 3-second rule; developed the 1-3-1 zone defense; National Invitation Tournament (NIT) championship (Long Island University, 1939, 1941); Author, Chip Hilton's Sports Stories for Young People [23]
1969 Taylor, Charles H. "Chuck"Charles H. "Chuck" Taylor Organized first basketball clinic at North Carolina State University (1922); developed the popular Converse Basketball Yearbook (1922); selected All-America teams (1932); The Chuck Taylor "All-Star" was the official shoe of the Olympics (1936–68) [24]
1971 Saperstein, Abraham M. "Abe"Abraham M. "Abe" Saperstein Saperstein's Globetrotters played before 55 million fans in 87 countries; the Globetrotters were part of the first basketball sellout ever at Madison Square Garden; led the Globetrotters to the World Professional Title (1940); won the International Cup with the Globetrotters (1943–44) [25]
1972 Douglas, Robert L. "Bob"Robert L. "Bob" Douglas Owned and coached New York Renaissance (1922–49); World Professional Championship with Renaissance (1939); known as "The Father of Black Professional Basketball" [26]
1972 Gottlieb, Edward "Ed"Edward "Ed" Gottlieb BAA Championship (Philadelphia Warriors, 1947); NBA Championship (Philadelphia Warriors, 1956); Chairman of NBA Rules Committee for 25 years; served as NBA schedule maker for 30 years [27]
1972 Wells, W.R. Clifford "Cliff"W.R. Clifford "Cliff" Wells 50 district, regional, and invitational tournaments, including two championships (Indiana state; 1919, 1934); first President, Indiana High School Coaching Association; member of National Rules Committee (1952–56); first full-time executive secretary and director of Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (1963–66) [28]
1973 Ripley, Elmer H.Elmer H. Ripley 2 NCAA Tournament (Georgetown; 1941, 1943); Eastern Championship (Georgetown, 1943); Israeli Olympic team coach (Melbourne, 1956); Canadian Olympic team coach (Rome, 1960) [29]
1974 Fisher, Harry A.Harry A. Fisher 2 Helms Athletic Foundation Championship (Columbia; 1904–05); Helms Athletic Foundation All-America (Columbia; 1904–05); Eastern Intercollegiate League championship (Columbia; 1911–12, 1914); editor of Collegiate Guide (1905–15) [30]
1974 Podoloff, MauriceMaurice Podoloff Served as NBA's first commissioner (1949–63); negotiated NBA's first TV contract (1954); arranged for construction and use of the first 24-second clock (1954); NBA's MVP Award is named in his honor [31]
1975 Liston, Emil S.Emil S. Liston 2 Kansas Conference Championship (Baker University; 1930, 1937); President of Kansas Conference Coaches Association (1936–38); created National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball (NAIB)/National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) tournament (1937); served as NAIA executive secretary (1940–49) [32]
1979 McLendon, John B.John B. McLendon 3 NAIA championship (Tennessee State; 1957–59); NAIA Coach of the Year (1958); 8 CIAA championships (1941, 1943–44, 1946–47, 1949–50, 1952); first African-American coach with Cleveland Pipers of the American Basketball League [33]
1979 Newell, Peter F. "Pete"Peter F. "Pete" Newell NCAA Championship (California; 1959); NIT Championship (San Francisco, 1949); Olympic Gold Medal (Rome, 1960); National Coach of the Year (1960) [34]
1980 Harrison, Lester "Les"Lester "Les" Harrison Organized Rochester Seagrams, Ebers, and Pros (1920s–40s); NBA championship (Rochester Royals, 1951); instrumental in formation of NBA (1949); organized Kodak Classic Collegiate Tournament (now Rochester Basketball Classic) [35]
1981 Hepp, FerencFerenc Hepp Member of FIBA Technical Commission (1948–56); President of Hungarian Basketball Federation (1954); member of FIBA Central Board (1956); member of FIBA Commission of Finances and Amateurism (1960–80) [36]
1981 Kennedy, James WalterJames Walter Kennedy Public Relations Director (BAA/NBA; 1946–51); Public Relations Director (Harlem Globetrotters, 1950s); John Bunn Award (1975); NBA named their citizenship award in his honor [37]
1982 Duer, Alva O.Alva O. Duer NAIB Finals appearance (Pepperdine; 1945); Director and founder of NAIB/NAIA National Basketball Championship Tournament (1949–75); member of U.S. Basketball Association Ethics Committee (1960–64); Board of Directors, U.S. Olympic Committee [38]
1983 Wilke, Louis G.Louis G. Wilke Chairman, AAU Basketball Committee, seven terms; Chairman and team manager, Olympic Basketball Committee (1948); Executive board member, U.S. Olympic Committee (1956, 1960); Vice-chairman, Pan American Federation and FIBA Rules Committee (1962) [39]
1984 Fagan, Clifford B. "Cliff"Clifford B. "Cliff" Fagan Executive Secretary of Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association (1947–57); Secretary of National Basketball Rules Committee (1958–77); Executive Director of National Federation of High Schools, (1959–77); member of U.S. Olympic Committee Board of Directors (1961–76) [40]
1984 Steitz, Edward S. "Ed"Edward S. "Ed" Steitz Instrumental in the reinstatement of the dunk (1976); eliminated jump ball with the exception of the start of the game and overtime (1981); advocate of the 45-second shot clock and three-point shot (1985); NIT Selection Committee (1962–68) [41]
1985 Abbott, Senda BerensonSenda Berenson Abbott Director of Physical Education (Smith College; 1892–11); organized first women's game at Smith College (March 22, 1893); author, Basketball Guide for Women (1901–07); Chairperson, Basketball Committee for Women (1905–17) [42]
1985 Teague, Bertha F.Bertha F. Teague 8 Oklahoma state championships and 7 runner-ups; compiled 36 20-plus win seasons, including 28 consecutive (1930–57); founded the first girls' basketball clinic and camp in the Southwest; coach of the Decade (1930s, 1940s, 1960s) by Jim Thorpe Athletic Awards Committee (1974) [43]
1991 Fleisher, Lawrence "Larry"Lawrence "Larry" Fleisher NBA Players Association general counsel (1963–87); developed free-agent system (1976); established antidrug agreement; involved in ABA-NBA merger [44]
1991 O'Brien, Lawrence F. "Larry"Lawrence F. "Larry" O'Brien The Sporting News Sportsman of the Year (1976); created NBA college scholarship program (1980); developed antidrug program (1984); President, Basketball Hall of Fame (1985–87) [45]
1991 Stankovic, Borislav "Boris"Borislav "Boris" Stankovic Italian national championship (Oransoda team, 1968); overseen the introduction of the three-point line in international competition; overseen reorganization of FIBA into zonal administration system; member of International Olympic Committee [46]
1999 Embry, Wayne R.Wayne R. Embry Five-time NBA All-Star (1961–65); NBA championship (Boston Celtics, 1968); first African-American NBA general manager (Milwaukee Bucks, 1971–79); The Sporting News NBA Executive of the Year (1992, 1998) [47]
1999 Zollner, FredFred Zollner NBL championship (Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons, 1944–45); key figure in the merger of the BAA and NBL to form the NBA; NBA Finals appearance (Fort Wayne Pistons, 1955–56); named "Mr. Pro Basketball" at the 1975 Silver Anniversary All-Star Game [48]
2000 Biasone, Daniel "Danny"Daniel "Danny" Biasone President and founder (Syracuse Nationals, 1946–63); inventor of 24-second shot clock (1954); NBA championship (Syracuse Nationals, 1955); John Bunn Award (1982) [49]
2000 Newton, Charles MartinCharles Martin Newton NCAA Championship (Kentucky, 1951); Southeastern Conference (SEC) Coach of the Year (1972 and 1976 with Alabama, 1988 and 1989 with Vanderbilt); President, USA. Basketball (1992–96); John Bunn Award (1997) [50]
2003 Hearn, Francis D. "Chic"Francis D. "Chic" Hearn Three-time National Sportscaster of the Year (1959, 1965, 1987); Curt Gowdy Media Award (1992); Emmy Award for Excellence in Basketball Coverage (1965); Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame (1986) [51]
2003 Lemon, MeadowlarkMeadowlark Lemon John Bunn Award (1998); played in more than 16,000 games; known as the "Clown Prince of Basketball" [52]
2003 Lloyd, Earl F.Earl F. Lloyd CIAA "Player of the Decade" for the 1940s; NAIA Silver and Golden Anniversary Teams; member of NBA Championship Team (1955); first African-American bench coach (1968) [53]
2004 Colangelo, JerryJerry Colangelo The Sporting News NBA Executive of the Year (1976, 1981, 1989, 1993); youngest general manager in professional sports (1968); enshrined in Illinois Basketball Hall of Fame (1995); former Chairman and CEO of the Arizona Diamondbacks [54]
2005 Brown, Hubert "Hubie"Hubert "Hubie" Brown Two-time NBA Coach of the Year (1978, 2004); ABA Championship (Kentucky Colonels, 1975); Curt Gowdy Media Award (2000); nominated for a Sports Emmy (1994, 1999) [55]
2006 Gavitt, DaveDave Gavitt Coach, 1980 United States Olympic Team; five-time New England Coach of the Year; John Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award (1987); Naismith Outstanding Contribution to Basketball Award winner (1993) [56]
2008 Davidson, WilliamWilliam Davidson Principal owner, Detroit Pistons (1974–2009); NBA championships (Detroit Pistons, 1989–90, 2004); Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) championships (Detroit Shock, 2003, 2006, 2008); first owner in sports history to win championships in three different professional leagues, NBA, WNBA, and National Hockey League (NHL) [57]
2008 Vitale, DickDick Vitale Sports Personality of the Year by the American Sportscasters Association (1989); Curt Gowdy Media Award (1998); NABC Cliff Wells Appreciation Award (2000); Books include Time Out Baby!, Campus Chaos, Living a Dream and Holding Court [58]

Players

As part of the inaugural class of 1959, four players were inducted, including George Mikan, who was the first NBA player to be enshrined. In total, 139 players have been inducted into the Hall of Fame; 86 of them have played in the NBA. The 1993 class had the most inductees, with eight. No players were inducted in 1965, 1967, 1968 and 2007. Three players have also been inducted as coaches: John Wooden in 1973, Bill Sharman in 2004, and Lenny Wilkens in 2004. Michael Jordan, David Robinson and John Stockton (all inducted in 2009) are the most recent players to have been inducted.

Eleven inductees are women: Lusia Harris-Stewart (1992), Nera D. White (1992), Ann E. Meyers (1993), Uljana Semjonova (1993), Carol A. Blazejowski (1994), Anne T. Donovan (1994), Cheryl Miller (1995), Nancy I. Lieberman (1996), Joan Crawford (1997), Denise M. Curry (1997), Lynette Woodard (2004) and Hortência de Fatima Marcari (2005). Out of those eleven, only Donovan, Lieberman and Woodard have played in the Women's National Basketball Association.[59][60] Harris-Stewart is the only female drafted by an NBA team,[61] while Meyers is the only one to have been signed by an NBA team.[62]

Nine inductees were born outside the United States. Canadian-born Robert J. "Bob" Houbregs (inducted 1987) was drafted by NBA's Milwaukee Hawks in 1953 and played five seasons in the league.[63] Both Sergei A. Belov and Uljana Semjonova (inducted 1992 and 1993) were born in the former Soviet Union (USSR) (respectively in modern-day Russia and Latvia) and respectively won gold medals for the USSR men's and women's teams at the Olympic Games. Krešimir Ćosić, Dražen Petrović, and Dražen Dalipagić (inducted in 1996, 2002 and 2004 respectively) represented Yugoslavia internationally during their careers, and Petrović represented Croatia after the initial breakup of Yugoslavia in 1991. Italian-born Dino Meneghin (inducted 2003) spent much of his career playing in the Italian A League. Hortência de Fatima Marcari, inducted in 2005, was born in Brazil and represented her homeland internationally. Nine-time NBA All-Stars Jacques Dominique Wilkins, inducted in 2006, was born in France.

Referees

The Referee category has existed since the beginning of the Hall of Fame and the first referee was inducted in 1959. Since then, 13 referees have been inducted.[2] Ernest C. Quigley, born in Canada, is the only inductee born outside of the United States.

Year Inductee Achievements[a] Ref.
1959 Kennedy, Matthew P. "Pat"Matthew P. "Pat" Kennedy Officiated high school, college, and professional games (1924–56); officiated in NCAA and NIT tournaments; BAA/NBA supervisor of referees (1946–50); officiated for the Harlem Globetrotters (1950–56) [64]
1960 Hepbron, George T.George T. Hepbron Conducted first national rules seminar; editor of AAU Basketball Guide (1901–14); secretary of the Olympic Basketball Committee (1903) [65]
1961 Hoyt, George H.George H. Hoyt Founded Eastern Massachusetts Board of Approved Basketball Officials; founded New England Interscholastic Basketball Tournament; chief of officials for the Eastern Massachusetts High School Tournament; refereed high school and college games [66]
1961 Quigley, Ernest C.Ernest C. Quigley Supervisor of NCAA tournament officials (1940–42); member of NCAA Football Rules Committee (1946–54); officiated more than 1,500 games in 40-year career; was Major League Baseball umpire for 25 years [67]
1961 Tobey, David "Dave"David "Dave" Tobey Officiated in the Eastern Intercollegiate Conference, the Eastern Conference, the Ivy League, and in the National Invitation Tournament; Executive Committee of the New York City High School Coaches Association; honorary member of the International Association of Approved Basketball Officials (IAABO) [68]
1961 Walsh, David H.David H. Walsh New Jersey State championship at Hoboken High School (1924); Associate Director of Collegiate Basketball Officials Bureau (1941–56); co-author of first Manual of Basketball Officiating; officiated in the Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball Conference and the Eastern Conference [69]
1978 Nucatola, John P.John P. Nucatola Officiated in 18 NCAA tournaments, in 18 National Invitation Tournaments; original referee in the BAA and NBA (1946–54); officiated in the Olympics (Helsinki, 1952, Melbourne, 1956) [70]
1979 Enright, James E. "Jim"James E. "Jim" Enright Officiated in Olympic playoffs (London, 1948, Helsinki, 1952), in NCAA Final Four (1954), in NCAA regional tournaments (1952, 1953); officiated two Major League Baseball All-Star Games (1950, 1962) [71]
1980 Shirley, J. DallasJ. Dallas Shirley Officiated in the Olympics (Rome, 1960); chief official of Pan American Games (1959); Chairman of U.S. Olympic Basketball Officials Committee (1976); conducted clinics in the U.S. and 13 foreign countries [72]
1983 Leith, Lloyd R.Lloyd R. Leith Officiated NCAA championship game between Kentucky and Kansas State (1951); officiated in the NCAA tournament for 16 years; became the tenth referee enshrined into the Hall; supervisor of officials of the Pacific Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (1955–62) [73]
1986 Mihalik, Zigmund J. "Red"Zigmund J. "Red" Mihalik Officiated 6 NCAA championship finals; refereed 3 NAIA Finals and 3 NIT Finals; officiated in the Olympics (Tokyo, 1964, Mexico City, 1968); best referee by Dell Publications [74]
1995 Strom, EarlEarl Strom Officiated in 7 NBA All-Star Games, in 29 NBA and ABA Finals; officiated in 2,400 regular season and 295 playoff games; NBA crew chief (1967–68) [75]
2007 Rudolph, Marvin "Mendy"Marvin "Mendy" Rudolph Officiated 2,112 NBA games, a record at the time of his retirement; first referee to officiate more than 2,000 NBA games; referee of 8 NBA All-Star Games and at least 1 game of the NBA Finals for 22 consecutive seasons; NBA Head of Officials [76]

Teams

The Team category has existed since the beginning of the Hall of Fame and the first teams were inducted in 1959. Since then, six teams have been inducted.

A black-and-white image of young male basketball players dressed in team uniform, sitting around a display that holds trophies. The plaque below the display reads "Pan-American Basket Ball Champions."
Buffalo Germans, inducted in 1961
Year Inductee Achievements[a] Ref.
1959 First Team Founded during a class at the Springfield YMCA; first game of basketball played on December 21, 1891 and consisted of 18 players, 9 to a side; score of first game was 1–0; toured U.S. and helped popularize basketball in the months following its invention [77]
1959 Original Celtics First professional team to sign exclusive player contracts; 2 American Basketball League (ABL) championships (1926–27); introduced post play, zone defenses, and switching man-to-man defense [78]
1961 Buffalo Germans Pan American Championship (1901); Olympic exhibition title (St. Louis, 1904); went undefeated in 5 of first 18 seasons; won 111 straight games (1908–10) [79]
1963 New York Renaissance Founded and owned by Hall of Famer Robert L. Douglas; World Professional Tournament (1939) [80]
2002 Harlem Globetrotters Played more than 20,000 games in more than 100 countries; the 25th anniversary tour was highlighted by a game before 75,000 fans in Berlin's Olympic Stadium (1951); won John Bunn Award (1999) [81]
2007 Texas Western Won the 1966 NCAA National Championship, started 5 African-American players (Bobby Joe Hill, David Lattin, Orsten Artis, Willie Worsley, & Harry Flournoy); finished the season with a 28–1 record; coached by Hall of Famer Don Haskins [82]

Notes

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ "James Naismith Biography". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/james-naismith. Retrieved March 28, 2009.  
  2. ^ a b c "Guidelines For Nomination and Election Into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/enshrinement-process/. Retrieved April 11, 2009.  
  3. ^ "Luther H. Gulick". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/luther-h-gulick. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  4. ^ "Edward J. "Ed" Hickox". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/edward-j-ed-hickox. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  5. ^ "Ralph Morgan". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/ralph-morgan. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  6. ^ "James Naismith". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/james-naismith. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  7. ^ "Harold G. Olsen". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/harold-g-olsen. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  8. ^ "Amos Alonzo Stagg". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/amos-alonzo-stagg. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  9. ^ "Oswald Tower". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/oswald-tower. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  10. ^ "Henry V. Porter". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/henry-v-porter. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  11. ^ "John J. O'Brien". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/john-j-obrien. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  12. ^ "Arthur A. Schabinger". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/arthur-a-schabinger. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  13. ^ "Arthur L. Trester". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/arthur-l-trester. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  14. ^ "Frank Morgenweck". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/frank-morgenweck. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  15. ^ "Lynn W. St. John". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/lynn-w-st-john. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  16. ^ "William A. Reid". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/william-a-reid. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  17. ^ "John W. Bunn". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/john-w-bunn. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  18. ^ "Edward S. "Ned" Irish". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/edward-s-ned-irish. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  19. ^ "R. William Jones". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/r-william-jones. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  20. ^ "Walter A. Brown". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/walter-a-brown. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  21. ^ "Paul D. "Tony" Hinkle". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/paul-d-tony-hinkle. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  22. ^ "William G. "Bill" Mokray". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/william-g-bill-mokray. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  23. ^ "Clair F. Bee". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/clair-f-bee. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  24. ^ "Charles H. "Chuck" Taylor". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/charles-h-chuck-taylor. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  25. ^ "Abraham M. "Abe" Saperstein". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/abraham-m-abe-saperstein. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  26. ^ "Robert L. "Bob" Douglas". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/robert-l-bob-douglas. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  27. ^ "Edward "Ed" Gottlieb". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/edward-ed-gottlieb. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  28. ^ "W.R. Clifford "Cliff" Wells". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/wr-clifford-cliff-wells. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  29. ^ "Elmer H. Ripley". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/elmer-h-ripley. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  30. ^ "Harry A. Fisher". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/harry-a-fisher. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  31. ^ "Maurice Podoloff". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/maurice-podoloff. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  32. ^ "Emil S. Liston". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/emil-s-liston. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  33. ^ "John B. McLendon". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/john-b-mclendon. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  34. ^ "Peter F. "Pete" Newell". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/peter-f-pete-newell. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  35. ^ "Lester "Les" Harrison". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/lester-les-harrison. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  36. ^ "Ferenc Hepp". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/ferenc-hepp. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  37. ^ "James Walter Kennedy". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/james-walter-kennedy. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  38. ^ "Alva O. Duer". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/alva-o-duer. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  39. ^ "Louis G. Wilke". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/louis-g-wilke. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  40. ^ "Clifford B. "Cliff" Fagan". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/clifford-b-cliff-fagan. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  41. ^ "Edward S. "Ed" Steitz". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/edward-s-ed-steitz. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  42. ^ "Senda Berenson Abbott". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/senda-berenson-abbott. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  43. ^ "Bertha F. Teague". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/bertha-f-teague. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  44. ^ "Lawrence "Larry" Fleisher". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/lawrence-larry-fleisher. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  45. ^ "Lawrence F. "Larry" O'Brien". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/lawrence-f-larry-obrien. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  46. ^ "Borislav "Boris" Stankovic". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/borislav-boris-stankovic. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  47. ^ "Wayne R. Embry". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/wayne-r-embry. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  48. ^ "Fred Zollner". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/fred-zollner. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  49. ^ "Daniel "Danny" Biasone". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/daniel-danny-biasone. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  50. ^ "Charles Martin Newton". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/charles-martin-newton. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  51. ^ "Francis D. "Chic" Hearn". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/francis-d-chic-hearn. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  52. ^ "Meadowlark Lemon". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/meadowlark-lemon. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  53. ^ "Earl F. Lloyd". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/earl-f-lloyd. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  54. ^ "Jerry Colangelo". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/jerry-colangelo. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  55. ^ "Hubert "Hubie" Brown". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/hubert-hubie-brown. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  56. ^ "Dave Gavitt". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/dave-gavitt. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  57. ^ "William Davidson". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/william-davidson. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  58. ^ "Dick Vitale". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/dick-vitale. Retrieved August 15, 2009.  
  59. ^ "Nancy Lieberman". Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. http://www.wbhof.com/lieberman.html. Retrieved November 7, 2009.  
  60. ^ "Lynette Woodard". Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. http://www.wbhof.com/woodard.html. Retrieved November 7, 2009.  
  61. ^ Kim, Randy. "Draft Oddities". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. http://www.nba.com/draft2003/draft_oddities_030619.html. Retrieved November 7, 2009.  
  62. ^ "Mercury Name Ann Meyers Drysdale As General Manager". WNBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. http://www.wnba.com/mercury/news/myers_gm_060912.html. Retrieved November 7, 2009.  
  63. ^ "Bob Houbregs". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. http://www.basketball-reference.com/players/h/houbrbo01.html. Retrieved November 7, 2009.  
  64. ^ "Matthew P. "Pat" Kennedy". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/matthew-p-pat-kennedy. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  65. ^ "George T. Hepbron". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/george-t-hepbron. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  66. ^ "George H. Hoyt". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/george-h-hoyt. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  67. ^ "Ernest C. Quigley". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/ernest-c-quigley. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  68. ^ "David "Dave" Tobey". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/david-dave-tobey. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  69. ^ "David H. Walsh". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/david-h-walsh. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  70. ^ "John P. Nucatola". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/john-p-nucatola. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  71. ^ "James E. "Jim" Enright". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/james-e-jim-enright. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  72. ^ "J. Dallas Shirley". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/j-dallas-shirley. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  73. ^ "Lloyd R. Leith". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/lloyd-r-leith. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  74. ^ "Zigmund J. "Red" Mihalik". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/zigmund-j-red-mihalik. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  75. ^ "Earl Strom". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/earl-strom. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  76. ^ "Marvin Rudolph". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/marvin-rudolph. Retrieved April 3, 2009.  
  77. ^ "First Team". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/first-team. Retrieved March 26, 2009.  
  78. ^ "Original Celtics". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/original-celtics. Retrieved March 26, 2009.  
  79. ^ "Buffalo Germans". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/buffalo-germans. Retrieved March 26, 2009.  
  80. ^ "New York Renaissance". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/new-york-renaissance. Retrieved March 26, 2009.  
  81. ^ "Harlem Globetrotters". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/harlem-globetrotters. Retrieved March 26, 2009.  
  82. ^ "Texas Western". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. CBS Interactive. http://www.hoophall.com/hall-of-famers/tag/texas-western. Retrieved March 26, 2009.  







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