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Ships of the
United States Navy

A-B * C * D-F * G-H
I-K * L * M * N-O* P
Q-R * S * T-V * W-Z

Aircraft carriers
Airships
Amphibious warfare ships
Auxiliaries
Battleships
Cruisers
Destroyers
Destroyer escorts
Escort carriers
Frigates
Mine warfare vessels
Monitors
Patrol vessels
Sailing frigates
Steam frigates
Steam gunboats
Ships of the line
Sloops of war
Submarines
Torpedo boats
USS Constitution in 1997

This is a list of sailing frigates of the United States Navy. Frigates were the backbone of the early Navy, although the list shows that many suffered unfortunate fates.

The sailing frigates of the United States built from 1797 on were unique in that their hulls were made of American live oak, a particularly hardy genus that made very resilient hulls; as a result of this, the ships were known to withstand damage that would have scuppered frigates of other nations. American frigates were also very heavily armed; the USN's 44s were actually armed with approximately 54 to 60 guns.

Contents

Continental Navy

Name Class Dates of Service Fate
Alliance[1] Alliance-class[2] 1778[1]– 1785[1] abandoned near Philadelphia[1]
Bonhomme Richard   1779 sank after taking Serapis
Boston[2] Boston-class[2] 1777[2]– 1780[2] captured by the British[2]
Bourbon 1783 never completed
Confederacy 1778–1781 captured by the British
Congress (II) 1776–1777 never completed
Deane 1778–1783
Delaware 1776–1777 captured by the British
Effingham 1777 never completed
Hancock[2] Hancock-class[2] 1776[2]– 1777[2] captured by the British[2]
Montgomery 1776–1777 destroyed to prevent capture, Hudson River
Providence 1776–1780 captured by the British, Charleston, South Carolina
Raleigh 1776–1778 captured by the British, Matinicus Isle, Maine
Randolph[2] Randolph-class 1776[2]– 1778[2] exploded in battle[2]
Virginia 1776–1778 captured by the British
Warren[2] Randolph-class[2] 1776[2]– 1779[2] destroyed to prevent capture, Penobscot Expedition[2]
Washington 1776–1777 destroyed to prevent capture, Philadelphia

United States Navy

Name Type Class Dates of Service Fate
Adams [2] 2nd class [3] Adams-class [2] 1799 – 1814 [2] scuttled and burned to prevent capture [2]
Boston [2] 2nd class [3] Boston-class [2] 1799 – 1814 [2] burned to prevent capture [2]
Brandywine [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1825 – 1864 [6] destroyed by fire [6]
Chesapeake [1] 2nd class [3] Chesapeake-class [1] 1800 – 1813 [1] captured by the British [1]
Columbia [6] 1st class [4] Guerriere-class [7] 1813 - 1814 [6] burned on the stocks to prevent capture [6]
Columbia [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1836 – 1861 scuttled and burned to prevent capture
Congress [1] 2nd class [8] Constellation-class [1] 1799 – 1834 [1] broken up [1]
Congress [9] 1st class [9] Congress-class [5] 1841 – 1862 [7] burned and sank after action with CSS Virginia [7]
Constellation [1] 2nd class [8] Constellation-class [1] 1797 – 1853 [1] remodeled into sloop-of-war
Constitution [1] 1st class [8] United States-class [1] 1797 [2] to date remains in commission
Cumberland [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1842 – 1862 sunk by CSS Virginia
Essex [2] 2nd class [10] Essex-class [2] 1799 – 1814 [2] captured by the British [2]
General Greene [2] 2nd class [3] General Greene-class [2] 1799 – 1814 [2] destroyed by fire [2]
Guerriere [8] 1st class [8] Guerriere-class [7] 1814 – 1841 [7] broken up [7]
Hudson [11] 1st class [11] Hudson-class [5] 1826 – 1844 [6] broken up [6]
Independence [9] 1st class [9] Independence-class [6] 1836 – 1912 scrapped
Insurgent 1799 – 1800 lost at sea
Java [7] 1st class [8] Guerriere-class [7] 1814 – 1842 [7] broken up, Norfolk, Virginia [7]
John Adams [2] John Adams-class [2] 1799 – 1867 [2] sold [2]
Macedonian [8] 2nd class [8] Lively-class [12] 1812 – 1828 broken up, Norfolk, Virginia
Macedonian [4] 2nd class [4] Lively-class [12] 1836 – 1871 sold
Mohawk [5] Mohawk-class [5] 1814 – 1823 [5] sunk [5]
New York [2] 2nd class [3] New York-class [2] 1800 – 1814 [2] burned by the British [2]
Philadelphia [2] 1st class [13] Philadelphia-class [2] 1799 – 1804 [2] captured by Tripoli [2]
boarded and burned by Stephen Decatur [2]
Plattsburg [5] Plattsburg-class [5] 1814 – 1825 [5] sold on ways [5]
Potomac [8] 1st class [8] Potomac-class [5] 1822 – 1877 sold
President [1] 2nd class [3] United States-class [1] 1800 – 1815 [1] captured by the British [1]
Raritan [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1843 – 1861 destroyed to prevent capture
Sabine [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1855 – 1883 sold
Santee [5] 1st class [9] Potomac-class [5] 1855 – 1912 [6] sank at moorings [6]
Savannah [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1855 – 1883 sold
St. Lawrence [4] 1st class [4] Potomac-class [5] 1848 – 1875 sold
Superior [6] Superior-class [5] 1814 – 1825 [5] sold [6]
United States [1] 1st class [8] United States-class [1] 1797 – 1861 [1]
1862 – 1866 [1]
broken up for scrap

References

Chapelle, Howard Irving. The History of the American Sailing Navy; The Ships and Their Development. New York: Norton, 1949.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sloops_of_war_of_the_United_States_Navy"

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Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Silverstone, Paul H. (2001). The Sailing Navy, 1775-1854. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1557508935. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax Bauer, Karl Jack; Roberts, Stephen S. (1991). Register of ships of the U.S. Navy, 1775-1990. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0313262029. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Griffis, William Elliot (2009). Matthew Calbraith Perry: A Typical American Naval Officer. BiblioLife. ISBN 978-1103046263. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q New York Journal of Commerce (December 19). December 1932. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Bauer, K. Jack (1991). Register of Ships of the US Navy, 1775-1990: Major Combatants. Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0313262029. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Canny, Donald L. (2001). Sailing Warships of the US Navy. US Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1557509901. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k This article includes information collected from the Naval Vessel Register, which, as a U.S. government publication, is in the public domain.
  9. ^ a b c d e Register of the Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the Navy of the United States, including Officers of the Marine Corps, and other, for the Year 1852. 
  10. ^ Brownell, Henry Howard (1863). North and South America Illustrated: The English in America. Hollbert, Williams, & Company. 
  11. ^ a b Williams, Edwin (1836). The New-York Annual Register for the Year of Our Lord 1836. Edwin Williams. 
  12. ^ a b De Kay, James Tertius (2000). Chronicles of the Frigate Macedonian, 1809-1922. W. W. Norton & Co.. ISBN 978-0393320244. 
  13. ^ Brighton, Ray (1984). The Checkered Career of Tobias Lear. Portsmouth Marine Society. ISBN 978-0915819034. 

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