The Full Wiki

List of the largest cannon by caliber: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Early 15th century Flemish supergun Dulle Griet at Ghent (caliber of 660 mm)

The list of cannon by caliber contains all types of cannons through the ages listed in decreasing caliber size. For the purpose of this list, the development of superguns can be divided into three periods, based on the kind of projectiles used:

  • Stone balls: Cannon of extraordinary bore, which fired stone balls, were first introduced at the turn of the 14th to 15th century in Western Europe. Following a logic of increasing performance through size, they had evolved from small handguns to giant wrought-iron or cast-bronze bombards within a span of just several decades.[1]
  • Iron balls: By the 16th century, however, a general switch from stone balls to smaller, but much more effective iron projectiles was in full swing. This and the parallel tendency towards standardized, rapid-firing cannon made the enormously costly and logistically demanding superguns soon obsolete in the European theatre (with the exception of the odd showpiece).[2]
  • Explosive shells: In the industrial age, artillery was again revolutionized by the introduction of explosive shells, beginning with the Paixhans guns. Breakthroughs in metallurgy and modes of production were followed up by new experimentation with super-sized caliber weapons, culminating in the steel colossi of the two World Wars. In the post-war era, the development of extremely overpowered artillery was gradually abandoned in favour of missile technology, while heavy guns are still demanded by various arms of the service.

As artillery pieces of the different periods, due to the dissimilar characteristics of their projectiles, are practically incommensurable in terms of their bore size, the following list is split into three sections.

Contents

Cannon by caliber

Advertisements

Stone balls

Heyday: 14th to 15th century

Caliber (mm) Name Type Produced Place of origin Made by
A view of the Tsar Pushka, showing its massive bore and cannonballs. 890[CB 1] Tsar Cannon Bombard 1586 Herb Moskovia-1 (Alex K).svg Tsardom of Russia Andrey Chokhov
Backside of the Pumhart von Steyr 820[CB 2][3] Pumhart von Steyr Bombard Early 15th cent. House of Habsburg
Engraving by Johann Georg Beck from 1714. The upper banner runs: "The largest cannon of Germany, called the Faule Metze". 735[CB 3][4] Faule Mette Bombard 1411 City of Brunswick,  Holy Roman Empire Henning Bussenschutte
The Dulle Griet at Ghent, close to the Friday Market square in the old town 660[5] Dulle Griet Bombard First half of 15th cent. City of Ghent,  Holy Roman Empire
Dismantled Dardanelles Gun in 2007 at Fort Nelson 650[6] Dardanelles Gun Bombard 1464  Ottoman Empire Munir Ali
Modern, fanciful illustration of the Faule Grete in action at the siege of Friesack in 1414. Contrary to the ordnance depicted, the Faule Grete was not assembled from wrought-iron bars, but a cast cannon. 520[7] Faule Grete Bombard 1409 Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights Heynrich Dumechen
Mons Meg with its 50 cm caliber cannon balls 520[8] Mons Meg Bombard 1449 Duchy of Burgundy Jehan Cambier
Bronze bombard of the Knights Hospitaller cast in 1480. 510[CB 4][9] Bombard 1480 Knights Hospitaller

Iron balls

Heyday: 16th to 18th century

Explosive shells

Heyday: 19th to 20th century

Caliber (mm) Name Type Produced Place of origin Made by
The Mortier monstre 975 Monster Mortar Mortar 1832 France France Henri-Joseph Paixhans
Little David at the Aberdeen Proving Ground 914 Little David Mortar 1945  United States
Mallet's Mortar with 36 inch shells which would have contained 480lb (217kg) of gunpowder 910 Mallet's mortar Mortar 1857 United Kingdom United Kingdom Robert Mallet
800 Schwerer Gustav Railway gun 1941  Nazi Germany Krupp
60 cm Karl-Gerät "Ziu" firing in Warsaw, August 1944 600 Karl-Gerät Howitzer 1940  Nazi Germany Rheinmetall
French 520 mm howitzer on cradle sliding recoil railway mount.jpg 520 Obusier de 520 modèle 1916 Railway howitzer 1918 France France Schneider et Cie
508 508 mm/9.6 smooth-bore naval gun Naval gun 1868 Romanov Flag.svg Russian Empire Motovilikha Plants
The Japanese battleship Yamato under construction 460 40 cm/45 Type 94 Naval gun 1940  Empire of Japan
Boche Buster at Catterick, 12 December 1940 457.2 BL 18 inch railway howitzer Railway howitzer 1920 United Kingdom United Kingdom Elswick Ordnance Company
On monitor HMS General Wolfe 457.2 BL 18 inch Mk I naval gun Naval gun 1916  United Kingdom Elswick Ordnance Company
Elswick 100-ton gun at Gibraltar 450 RML 17.72 inch gun Naval gun 1877 United Kingdom United Kingdom Elswick Ordnance Company
One of the first Big Berthas being readied for firing 420 Big Bertha Howitzer  German Empire Krupp
Side view of a Gamma-Gerät 420 42 cm Gamma Mörser Mortar  German Empire /  Nazi Germany Krupp
2B1 Oka 420 2B1 Oka Mortar 1957  Soviet Union
BL 16.25 inch naval gun 412.8 BL 16.25 inch Mk I naval gun Naval gun 1888  United Kingdom Elswick Ordnance Company
406 mm gun from Japanese battleship Mutsu 406 41 cm/45 3rd Year Type Naval gun  Empire of Japan
16 inch Coastal Defense Gun at the US Army Ordnance Museum 406 16"/50 caliber M1919 gun Gun 1920  United States
Guns of HMS Rodney at maximum elevation, 1940 406 BL 16 inch Mk I naval gun Naval gun 1927  United Kingdom
Batterie Lindemann gun, 1942 406 Adolf Gun Naval gun  Nazi Germany Krupp
A cutaway of a turret mounting 16-inch guns 406 16"/50 caliber Mark 7 gun Naval gun 1943  United States
406 2A3 Kondensator 2P Howitzer 1956  Soviet Union
A 406 mm/50 B-37 naval gun in MP-10 test mount 406 406 mm/50 B-37 naval gun for BB Sovetskiy Soyuz Naval gun 1937  Soviet Union Barrikady Plant, Stalingrad

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The bombard has a conical bore of 82.5–90 cm.
  2. ^ The bombard has a conical bore of 76–88 cm.
  3. ^ The bombard has a conical bore of 67–80 cm.
  4. ^ The bombard has a conical bore of 45–58 cm.

Footnotes

  1. ^ Schmidtchen 1977b, pp. 228–230
  2. ^ Schmidtchen 1977a, pp. 153–161
  3. ^ Schmidtchen 1977a, p. 162; ball diameter is 20 mm less (p. 171, Fn. 41).
  4. ^ Schmidtchen 1977b, p. 222; ball diameter is 20 mm less (p. 171, Fn. 41).
  5. ^ Schmidtchen 1977a, p. 164; ball diameter is 20 mm less (p. 171, Fn. 41).
  6. ^ Schmidtchen 1977b, p. 227; ball diameter is 20 mm less (p. 171, Fn. 41).
  7. ^ Schmidtchen 1977b, p. 218; ball diameter is 20 mm less (p. 171, Fn. 41).
  8. ^ Schmidtchen 1977a, p. 166; ball diameter is 20 mm less (p. 171, Fn. 41).
  9. ^ Schmidtchen 1977b, p. 236, Fn. 103

References

  • Schmidtchen, Volker (1977a), "Riesengeschütze des 15. Jahrhunderts. Technische Höchstleistungen ihrer Zeit", Technikgeschichte 44 (2): 153–173 
  • Schmidtchen, Volker (1977b), "Riesengeschütze des 15. Jahrhunderts. Technische Höchstleistungen ihrer Zeit", Technikgeschichte 44 (3): 213–237 

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message