The Full Wiki

More info on Livia Bitton-Jackson

Livia Bitton-Jackson: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Livia Bitton-Jackson is an author and Holocaust survivor. Born Elli L. Friedmann in Czechoslovakia[1], she was 13 years old when she, along with her mother and brother, were taken to Auschwitz, the largest German concentration camp.[2]She and her brother, Bubi, were liberated in 1945, and came to the U.S. on a refugee boat in 1951. She studied at New York University, from which she received a Ph.D. in Hebrew Culture and Jewish History.

Holocaust

Livia lived in Samorja, Hungary, when the Germans invaded in 1944. The customary segregation's of Jews were initiated, (i.e. Entering areas like theaters, restaurants, and groceries was prohibited. They had to wear the yellow star, and their possessions were confiscated) Two months into the German occupation, she was, along with all the Jews in that area, were moved to a ghetto that consisted of a synagogue and roughly 20 surrounding houses. Partway through their stay there, all men between the ages of 18 and 45, her father included, were sent to a forced labor camp in Komárom, some fifty miles from the ghetto[3]. Two weeks after her father was taken, she, her aunt, mother.., and brother where removed from the ghetto and taken, over a journey of four days, to Auschwitz, the largest concentration camp in Poland. She and her mother stayed there for 10 days. In June, 1944, she, and her mother, are transferred, along with 500 other women, to Camp Plaszow, the most notorious forced labor camp in Poland. There, their work consisted of leveling off a hilltop in preparation for construction. If they did not work, or work properly, or violate any rule, they would be beaten by their Kapo, or his assistants. After two months stay at Plaszow, they are returned to Auschwitz.

In August, they are taken from Auschwitz to a factory in Augsburg. In Augsburg, she is put to work in assembly line in the factory, where they produce a

...precision instrument that is supposed to control the distance and direction of the bomb ejected by a fighter plane. [3]

where they stay until April, 1945. After the war she, her brother, and her mother return to Šamorín, believing that her father will be waiting for them, only to discover that he is dead. Her brother then moves to New York with a visa from a school scholarship. Bitton-Jackson had the opportunity to go go with her brother but chose to stay in Czechoslovakia with her mother. The two stay in Šamorín until 1951, when they finally get visas to go to America.[4]

Life

After the war she and her brother and mother return to Šamorín, believing that her father will be waiting for them, only to discover that he is dead. Her brother then moves to New York with a visa from a school scholarship. Bitton-Jackson had the opportunity to go go with her brother but chose to stay in Czechoslovakia with her mother. The two stay in Šamorín until 1951, when they finally get visas to go to America. They travel over to America on a refugee boat, and Ms. Jackson, as she is now bob saiyhf an adult, continues her education. She eventually enrolled in New York University, and got a degree there. Dr. Bitton Jackson has a Ph.D. in Hebrew Culture and Jewish History obtained at New York University. She has been a professor of history at City University of New York for 37 years. has won numerous awards, including the 1998 Christopher Award for her book, I Have Lived a Thousand Years. ?[5]

In 1977 Prof. Bitton moved to Israel, where she has been living since. She continued teaching in CUNY for years thereafter, and still makes periodic trips to the US for speaking engagements. In April 2009, Prof. Bitton Jackson was invited to speak in Omaha, NE for Holocaust Remembrance Day in the Durham Museum, with videolinks to Pleasanton and other Nebraska high schools. She also spoke to members of the Strategic Air Command at Offutt AFB.[6]

References

  1. ^ Zeiger, Hanna B. "I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust." Horn Book Magazine 73.4 (July 1997): 472-473. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 10 Mar. 2009 <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=9709035144&site=ehost-live>
  2. ^ "Livia Bitton-Jackson - Author profile and Information". Simon & Schuster. http://authors.simonandschuster.com/Livia-Bitton-Jackson/1324911.  
  3. ^ a b Bitton-Jackson, Livia. (1999). I Have Lived a Thousand Years. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-6898-2395-9.  
  4. ^ Bitton-Jackson, Livia, " Hello, America, A Refugee's Journey from Auschwitz to the New World", July 1, 2006, ISBN 1-4169-1625-3
  5. ^ "Christopher Awards 1990 - 1999". http://book.consumerhelpweb.com/awards/christopher/1990.htm.  
  6. ^ [1]
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message