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Robert Lloyd Hall-Thompson TD (9 April 1920 - 20 May 1992), known as Lloyd Hall-Thompson, was a Unionist politician in Northern Ireland.

Born in Belfast, Hall-Thompson was the son of Samuel Hall-Thompson.[1] He studied at Campbell College in Belfast and joined the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) in 1938. He was commissioned into the 8th Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery in 1939 and served during World War II, reaching the rank of Captain. For ten years from 1946, he served in the Territorial Army, reaching the rank of Major.[2]

Hall-Thompson was elected to the Parliament of Northern Ireland at the 1969 election, representing Belfast Clifton. He won as an independent Unionist, supporting Prime Minister of Northern Ireland Terence O'Neill. In September 1970, he rejoined the UUP.[1]

Following the abolition of the Parliament, Hall-Thompson was elected to the 1973 Northern Ireland Assembly for Belfast North, representing the UUP. The following year, he became the leader of the Assembly and also the Executive's Chief Whip, before joining the Unionist Party of Northern Ireland. Under this new label, he was elected to the Northern Ireland Constitutional Convention of 1975.[1]

Outside politics, Hall-Thompson was involved in horse breeding.[2]

Late in life, Hall-Thompson joined the Conservative Party, and in 1988 he became the Chair of the Lagan Valley Conservative Association.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Northern Ireland Parliamentary Elections Results: Biographies
  2. ^ a b "Dictionary of Ulster Biography", Ulster History Circle
Parliament of Northern Ireland
Preceded by
William James Morgan
Member of Parliament for Belfast Clifton
1969 - 1972
Succeeded by
Position prorogued 1972
Parliament abolished 1973
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