The Full Wiki

Londonderry, New Hampshire: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Londonderry, New Hampshire
—  Town  —

Seal
Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire
Coordinates: 42°51′54″N 71°22′26″W / 42.865°N 71.37389°W / 42.865; -71.37389
Country United States
State New Hampshire
County Rockingham
Incorporated 1722
Government
 - Town council Michael Brown, Chairman
Brian Farmer
Paul DiMarco
Kathy Wagner
Sean O'Keefe
Area
 - Total 41.9 sq mi (108.6 km2)
 - Land 41.8 sq mi (108.3 km2)
 - Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)  0.31%
Elevation 420 ft (128 m)
Population (2007)
 - Total 24,975
 Density 597.5/sq mi (230.6/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 03053
Area code(s) 603
FIPS code 33-43220
GNIS feature ID 0873651
Website www.londonderrynh.org

Londonderry is a town in western Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The town is bordered on the north by the city of Manchester and on the east by the town of Derry. The population was 23,236 at the 2000 census. Londonderry is known for its apple orchards and is partial home to the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport.

The more densely settled portion of town, where over 49% of the population resides, is defined as the Londonderry census-designated place (CDP) and roughly occupies the eastern and southern parts of town, around New Hampshire Route 102.

Contents

History

Londonderry lies in an area that was first known as "Nutfield" because of the heavy woods with nut trees. The town was settled in 1718. In 1722, it was chartered and given the name "Londonderry", after the city in the Province of Ulster in the northern part of Ireland called Londonderry or Derry.

Early Ulster Scots settlers spread out into surrounding villages, bringing Scottish and Irish names like Antrim, Derry and Dunbarton. Londonderry was the second largest town in early colonial times, and Derry, Windham and a portion of Manchester were formed from it.

In 1719, the first American potato was grown in Derry, then a part of Londonderry.

In 1790, the first year that a census was taken in Londonderry, the population was 2,622.

Antique postcards

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 41.9 square miles (108.5 km2), of which 41.8 sq mi (108.3 km2) is land and 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2) is water, comprising 0.31% of the town. The census-designated place portion of Londonderry has a total area of 12.2 sq mi (32 km2), of which 0.16% is water.

Londonderry is drained on the east by Beaver Brook and on the west by Little Cohas Brook and Nesenkeag Brook. The town's highest point is 535 feet (163 m) above sea level, on "Number Eight Hill" (named after the old school house that used to be on it) north of the center of town.

The town is crossed by Interstate 93, New Hampshire Route 102, New Hampshire Route 128, and New Hampshire Route 28.

Advertisements

Neighboring cities and towns

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 23,236 people, 7,623 households, and 6,319 families residing in the town. The population density was 555.8 people per square mile (214.6/km²). There were 7,718 housing units at an average density of 184.6/sq mi (71.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.92% White, 0.56% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 1.16% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% of the population.

There were 7,623 households out of which 50.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.1% were non-families. 12.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.05 and the average family size was 3.36.

In the town the population was spread out with 32.9% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 5.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $70,501, and the median income for a family was $73,513. Males had a median income of $50,566 versus $33,821 for females. The per capita income for the town was $26,491. About 1.6% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Census-designated place

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 11,417 people, 3,832 households, and 3,130 families residing in the CDP occupying the eastern and southern parts of town. The population density was 936.0 people per square mile (361.3/km²). There were 3,881 housing units at an average density of 318.2/sq mi (122.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.22% White, 0.50% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.93% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.21% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.52% of the population.

There were 3,832 households out of which 48.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.7% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.3% were non-families. 13.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.98 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 32.0% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 5.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.8 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $68,707, and the median income for a family was $71,484. Males had a median income of $50,184 versus $31,998 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $26,767. About 1.5% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.6% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Londonderry is home to numerous businesses, many of which are located in the northern part of the town near Manchester-Boston Regional Airport (MHT), or in the southeastern part of town near I-93, on NH 102. Major businesses headquartered in town include Stonyfield Farm and Blue Seal Feeds; also a bottling facility of the Coca-Cola Bottling Co. is located in town. Mack's Apples, Sunnycrest Farm, Elwood Orchards, and Woodmont Orchards are among the several orchards in town and are emblematic of the town's important farming heritage. The town is also home to numerous chain retailers.

Education

The town is served by the Londonderry School District.

Kindergarten:

  • Moose Hill School (includes LEEP, the Londonderry Early Education Program)

Elementary Schools:

  • North School
  • Matthew Thornton Elementary School
  • South School

Middle School:

  • Londonderry Middle School

High School:

  • Londonderry High School (home of the Lancers), known for its exceptional marching band program, which traveled to China in the summer of 2008.

Notable inhabitants

Sister cities

Site of interest

References

Further reading

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message