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Lone Wolf McQuade

Lone Wolf McQuade movie poster
Directed by Steve Carver
Produced by Yoram Ben-Ami
Steve Carver
Written by H. Kaye Dyal
B.J. Nelson
Starring Chuck Norris
Music by Francesco De Masi
Cinematography Jerry G. Callaway
Roger Shearman
Michael Sibley
Editing by Anthony Redman
Studio El Paso
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date(s) 15 April 1983
Running time 108 mins
Country USA
Language English
Spanish

Lone Wolf McQuade is a 1983 action film, starring Chuck Norris, David Carradine, Barbara Carrera, and Robert Beltran, and is directed by Steve Carver. The film score was written by Francesco De Masi.

Contents

Plot

The main character, J.J. McQuade, is a Texas Ranger who prefers to work alone. He lives in a dirty home in the middle of nowhere with a pet wolf. The film opens with McQuade involved in an intense battle with Mexican-bandits—a gang of horse thieves—from which he emerges unscathed. Shaking off the dust, McQuade returns to El Paso, Texas to attend the retirement ceremony of his fellow Ranger and close friend Dakota. After the party, his commander attempts to curb his "lone wolf" attitude by insisting he work with local Texas State Trooper Kayo Ramos, a tough but clean-cut and polite Latino. McQuade has a teenage daughter who came from a past marriage and is still on relatively good terms with his former wife. When his daughter is injured (and her fiancé is killed) after witnessing the hijacking of an US Army convoy (one of the hijackers is driving a Dodge Aspen which pushes her fiancé's car over an embankment), McQuade more readily works with Kayo to find out who did this to his daughter. Kayo's computer skills allow him to track the errant convoy. At an illegal garment factory, they pick up a young delinquent named Snow, who is reluctant to talk until Dakota points a Mac-10 in his general direction and empties the magazine.

As the story progresses, they are joined by FBI Special Agent Jackson. The trail leads them to arms merchant Rawley Wilkes, who is hijacking U.S. arms shipments for his illicit weapons deals. Wilkes is trained in martial arts and often gives free demonstrations at county fairs.

The three eventually find the arms trading headquarters in the Mexican desert. Agent Núñez is killed while saving Kayo from machine gun fire. McQuade is buried inside his truck but manages to escape, though injured. Agent Jackson is struck by gunfire on two separate occasions but still manages to assist McQuade and Kayo in the final attack. After an intense battle, McQuade and Wilkes engage, with the fight leaning first in Wilkes' favor until he strikes McQuade's daughter, provoking McQuade into a frenzy that defeats Wilkes. McQuade is reunited with his daughter, only to be fired upon by an injured Wilkes. Wilkes' business partner (and McQuade's new romantic interest) steps into the line of fire to save McQuade and is killed in the process. Wilkes retreats, and the film ends with McQuade victorious after a climactic finale when he throws a grenade that explodes and kills Wilkes.

Cast

Production

  • David Carradine and Chuck Norris refused to use stunt doubles for their climactic fight scene, despite strong reservations from the producers.
  • Norris credits this film as a leading inspiration for his hit television series, Walker, Texas Ranger, which premiered a decade later. Yet the pilot had to be rewritten, and the characters' names changed, since "all things McQuade" were copyrighted by Orion Pictures.
  • An uncredited John Milius helped write the screenplay.

External links

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Lone Wolf McQuade
Directed by Steve Carver
Produced by Yoram Ben-Ami
Steve Carver
Written by H. Kaye Dyal
B.J. Nelson
Starring Chuck Norris
Music by Francesco De Masi
Cinematography Jerry G. Callaway
Roger Shearman
Michael Sibley
Editing by Anthony Redman
Studio El Paso
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date(s) 15 April 1983
Running time 108 mins
Country USA
Language English
Spanish

Lone Wolf McQuade is a 1983 action film, starring Chuck Norris, David Carradine, Barbara Carrera, and Robert Beltran, and is directed by Steve Carver. The film score was written by Francesco De Masi. The screeplay features a quiver full of one-dimensional characters: the "lone wolf" Ranger Jim McQuade (Norris), the bad guy (Carradine) with a wife (Carrera) who falls for the hero at first sight, the retired buddy, the captain trying to rein in the hero, and the new young partner the hero doesn't want.

Contents

Plot

The main character, J.J. McQuade, is a Texas Ranger who prefers to work alone. He lives in a dirty home in the middle of nowhere with a pet wolf. The film opens with McQuade involved in an intense battle with Mexican-bandits—a gang of horse thieves—from which he emerges unscathed. Shaking off the dust, McQuade returns to El Paso, Texas to attend the retirement ceremony of his fellow Ranger and close friend Dakota. After the party, his commander attempts to curb his "lone wolf" attitude by insisting he work with local Texas State Trooper Kayo Ramos, a tough but clean-cut and polite Latino. McQuade has a teenage daughter who came from a past marriage and is still on relatively good terms with his former wife. When his daughter is injured (and her fiancé is killed) after witnessing the hijacking of an US Army convoy (one of the hijackers is driving a Dodge Aspen which pushes her fiancé's car over an embankment), McQuade more readily works with Kayo to find out who did this to his daughter. Kayo's computer skills allow him to track the errant convoy. At an illegal garment factory, they pick up a young delinquent named Snow, who is reluctant to talk until Dakota points a Mac-10 in his general direction and empties the magazine.

As the story progresses, they are joined by FBI Special Agent Jackson. The trail leads them to arms merchant Rawley Wilkes, who is hijacking U.S. arms shipments for his illicit weapons deals. Wilkes is trained in martial arts and often gives free demonstrations at county fairs.

The three eventually find the arms trading headquarters in the Mexican desert. Agent Núñez is killed while saving Kayo from machine gun fire. McQuade is buried inside his truck but manages to escape, though injured. Agent Jackson is struck by gunfire on two separate occasions but still manages to assist McQuade and Kayo in the final attack. After an intense battle, McQuade and Wilkes engage, with the fight leaning first in Wilkes' favor until he strikes McQuade's daughter, provoking McQuade into a frenzy that defeats Wilkes. McQuade is reunited with his daughter, only to be fired upon by an injured Wilkes. Wilkes' business partner (and McQuade's new romantic interest) steps into the line of fire to save McQuade and is killed in the process. Wilkes retreats, and the film ends with McQuade victorious after a climactic finale when he throws a grenade that explodes and kills Wilkes.

Cast

Production

  • David Carradine and Chuck Norris refused to use stunt doubles for their climactic fight scene, despite strong reservations from the producers.
  • Norris credits this film as a leading inspiration for his hit television series, Walker, Texas Ranger, which premiered a decade later. Yet the pilot had to be rewritten, and the characters' names changed, since "all things McQuade" were copyrighted by Orion Pictures. The original co-producer of the series was The Cannon Group, which like Orion is now absorbed into Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (though the Cannon films are distributed on television by another company).
  • An uncredited John Milius helped write the screenplay.

External links


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