The Full Wiki

More info on Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center

Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center
LAC-USC Healthcare Logo.png
Geography
Location Los Angeles, California, United States
Organization
Care system Public hospital
Hospital type Teaching
Affiliated university University of Southern California
Services
Emergency department Level I trauma center
Beds 600
History
Founded 1878
Links
Website home page
Lists Hospitals in California

Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center (also known as LAC+USC and County General) is a 600-bed public teaching hospital located in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.

Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center is one of the largest public hospitals and medical training centers in the United States, and the largest single provider of healthcare in Los Angeles County. It provides healthcare services for the region's medically underserved, is a Level I trauma center and treats over 28 percent of the region's trauma victims (2005). It provides care for half of all AIDS and sickle-cell anemia patients in Southern California. LAC+USC Medical Center is owned and operated by the County of Los Angeles.

Although by law the emergency room must accept all patients regardless of ability to pay, hospital care is not free. LAC+USC accepts self-pay patients as well as patients covered by private insurance, Medicare, and Medicaid (Medi-Cal).

On November 8, 2008, transfer of all inpatients from Womens and Children's Hospital and the historic white 800-bed hospital on the hill to a new, $1 billion, state-of-the-art 600-bed replacement hospital just south of it was completed, and the new hospital was fully opened for service. The new hospital consists of three linked buildings: a clinic tower, a diagnostic and treatment tower, and an inpatient tower. It was built in part because the old building did not meet fire codes. The old building remains open for offices and support services only. The new facility has a larger number of intensive care beds to handle patients in the aftermath of disasters.

Street front view of the outpatient clinic of the new hospital, opened November 2008.

The LAC+USC Medical Center provides a full spectrum of emergency, inpatient and outpatient services. These include medical, surgical, emergency/trauma, obstetrical, gynecological and pediatric services as well as psychiatric services for adults, adolescents and children. Some LAC+USC doctors are faculty of the USC Keck School of Medicine; care is also provided by more than 1,000 medical residents.[1]

Front entrance of the historic building.

LAC+USC is one of the busiest public hospitals in the Western United States, with nearly 39,000 inpatients discharged, and one million ambulatory care patient visits each year. The Emergency Department is one of the world's busiest, with more than 150,000 visits per year. [1]. LAC+USC operates one of only three burn centers in Los Angeles County and one of the few Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Southern California. LAC+USC is also the home of the Angeles County College of Nursing and Allied Health, which has prepared registered nurses for professional practice since its founding in 1895.

The Los Angeles County Hospital and the University of Southern California Medical School were first affiliated in 1885, five years after USC was founded. The present-day LAC+USC complex is adjacent to the University of Southern California Health Sciences Campus, which includes the USC Keck School of Medicine, USC School of Pharmacy, USC University Hospital and the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and Hospital.

LAC+USC's three-year cardiology fellowship program is currently on probation because of "insufficient teaching time by the faculty"; training and teaching plans are being reformed.[2] The cardiology fellowship has been reaccredited and is again matriculating fellows.

View of Downtown Los Angeles from the top of the hospital's parking structure

Contents

Film and television appearances

The portion of the LAC+USC Medical Center seen as the exterior during the closing credits of General Hospital from 1975 until 1993.

Marilyn Monroe was born in the charity ward of this hospital on June 1, 1926. The hospital also has a jail ward. In 1954, Stan Getz was processed in the jail ward as his wife gave birth to their third child one floor below. He had been arrested for attempting to rob a pharmacy to get a morphine fix.

The distinct Art Deco-style main building served as the exterior of the hospital in the opening titles of the soap opera General Hospital beginning in 1975, and for the 1998 Meg RyanNicolas Cage movie City of Angels. In Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles the episode entitled "The Good Wound" exterior shots of the older LAC+USC facility to represent the hospital where Riley (Leven Rambin) was being held.

The outside of the hospital appeared in the television series "Dr. Kildare", where it was known as "Blair General Hospital". There were a number of scenes filmed in one of the hospital's larger operating theaters in the TV series "Ben Casey". The hospital also appears in the movie "El Norte".

References

  1. ^ "Los Angeles County Hospital + USC Medical Center". Keck School of Medicine. University of Southern California. 2006-02-10. http://www.usc.edu/schools/medicine/patient_care/hospitals_clinics/lacusc_medical.html. Retrieved 2008-07-11.  
  2. ^ Lin, Rong-Gong (2008-07-11). "County-USC may lose its cardiology training program". Los Angeles Times. http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-usc11-2008jul11,0,4005555.story. Retrieved 2008-07-11.  

External links

Coordinates: 34°03′34″N 118°12′30″W / 34.05939°N 118.20847°W / 34.05939; -118.20847

See also

  • Knocking, a documentary on Jehovah's Witnesses, featuring LAC+USC Medical Center
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message