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Louis Hayward
Born Louis Charles Hayward
March 19, 1909(1909-03-19)
Johannesburg, South Africa
Died February 21, 1985 (aged 75)
Palm Springs, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1932–1974
Spouse(s) June Hanson (1953-1985) (his death)
Peggy Morrow Field (1946-1950) (divorced)
Ida Lupino (1938-1945) (divorced)
[Louis Hayward at the Internet Movie Database Official website]

Louis Charles Hayward (19 March 1909 – 21 February 1985) was a British actor born in South Africa.

Contents

Biography

Born in Johannesburg, Hayward's screen work began in British films, notably as Leslie Charteris' The Saint in The Saint in New York. In 1939 he played a dual role in The Man in the Iron Mask.

During World War II, Hayward enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and commanded a photographic unit that filmed the Battle of Tarawa in a documentary titled With the Marines at Tarawa (winner of the 1944 Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject). Hayward was awarded the Bronze Star Medal[1]

He also played the role of Philip Lombard in the 1945 version of And Then There Were None. Hayward starred in the 1954 television series The Lone Wolf. Hayward's other television work includes a role as a judge in an episode, "Day of Reckoning" (original air date 22 November 1962), of the Alfred Hitchcock Hour.[citation needed]

He retired from acting during the 1970s.[2]

Personal life

Louis Hayward had one son, Dana, with his third wife, June Hanson. He also had a homosexual relationship with Noel Coward.[3][4]

Death

Louis Hayward died in Palm Springs, California from lung cancer, aged 75. Commenting on his own impending death he said "I got precisely what I deserved after a four-pack-a-day habit for fifty years.".[5]

Selected filmography

Source

References

  1. ^ Tarawa documentary won Academy Award - Marine Corps Community for USMC Veterans
  2. ^ Louis Hayward Internet Movie Database accesses 24 February 2010.
  3. ^ Morley, Sheridan (2005). Coward (Life & Times). Haus Publishing. p. 135. ISBN 978-1904341888. 
  4. ^ Various (2007). The Columbia Encyclopedia of Modern Drama. Columbia University Press. p. 296. ISBN 978-0231140324. 
  5. ^ Louis Hayward Internet Movie Database accesses 24 February 2010.

External links

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