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Lucius Calpurnius Piso (consul 15 BC): Wikis

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Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi 'Pontifex' (PW 99) (48 BC - 32 AD) was a prominent Roman senator of the early principate. He was the son of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus and brother of Calpurnia Pisonis, wife of Julius Caesar. He became a confidante of the emperors Augustus and Tiberius. His tenure as a pontifex was used by contemporary Romans to differentiate him from his contemporary homonym, Lucius Calpurnius Piso the Augur

Piso was made consul in 15 BC, probably shortly thereafter engaged in Mediolanum as a proconsul (Suet. De rhet. 6). Cassius Dio refers to him as governor of Pamphylia in the years 13-11 BC; his province probably included Galatia. In 11 BC, he was sent to Thrace as legatus pro praetore to put down a revolt. For his successes there, the Senate honoured him with the ornamenta triumphalia (Cass. Dio 54.34.7; Tac. Ann. 6.10).

He may have also been proconsul of Asia and legate of Syria, but this is disputed. From AD 13-32 he was praefectus urbi, and he was a trusted advisor of both Augustus and Tiberius. He was a member of the pontifical college and the Arval Brethren. He died in AD 32 and was honoured with a state funeral (Tac. Ann. 6.10).

Piso's achievements and independence were highly regarded. Horace dedicated his Ars poetic to him (cf. Carmen 2.12). Antipater of Thessalonica dedicated many epigrams to him

Preceded by
Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus and Publius Cornelius Scipio
Consul of the Roman Empire
15 BC
Succeeded by
Marcus Licinius Crassus Dives and Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus

References

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Lucius Calpurnius Piso "the Pontifex" (PW 99) (48 BC - 32 AD) was a prominent Roman senator of the early principate. He was the son of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus and brother of Calpurnia Pisonis, wife of Julius Caesar. He became a confidante of the emperors Augustus and Tiberius. His tenure as a pontifex was used by contemporary Romans to differentiate him from his contemporary homonym, Lucius Calpurnius Piso the Augur

Piso was made consul in 15 BC, probably shortly thereafter engaged in Mediolanum as a proconsul (Suet. De rhet. 6). Cassius Dio refers to him as governor of Pamphylia in the years 13-11 BC; his province probably included Galatia. In 11 BC, he was sent to Thrace as legatus pro praetore to put down a revolt. For his successes there, the Senate honoured him with the ornamenta triumphalia (Cass. Dio 54.34.7; Tac. Ann. 6.10).

He may have also been proconsul of Asia and legate of Syria, but this is disputed. From AD 13-32 he was praefectus urbi, and he was a trusted advisor of both Augustus and Tiberius. He was a member of the pontifical college and the Arval Brethren. He died in AD 32 and was honoured with a state funeral (Tac. Ann. 6.10).

Piso's achievements and independence were highly regarded. Horace dedicated his Ars poetic to him (cf. Carmen 2.12). Antipater of Thessalonica dedicated many epigrams to him

Template:Start box |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus and Publius Cornelius Scipio |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Consul of the Roman Empire
15 BC |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Marcus Licinius Crassus Dives and Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus |- Template:End box

References


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