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Meis homeobox 2
Identifiers
Symbols MEIS2; HsT18361; MGC2820; MRG1
External IDs OMIM601740 MGI108564 HomoloGene7846 GeneCards: MEIS2 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE MEIS2 207480 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 4212 17536
Ensembl ENSG00000134138 ENSMUSG00000027210
UniProt O14770 Q3TY73
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_020149 NM_010825
RefSeq (protein) NP_064534 NP_034955
Location (UCSC) Chr 15:
34.97 - 35.18 Mb
Chr 2:
115.55 - 115.76 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Homeobox protein Meis2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MEIS2 gene.[1][2]

This gene encodes a homeobox protein belonging to the TALE ('three amino acid loop extension') family of homeodomain-containing proteins. TALE homeobox proteins are highly conserved transcription regulators, and several members have been shown to be essential contributors to developmental programs. Multiple transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms have been described for this gene.[2]

References

  1. ^ Smith JE, Afonja O, Yee HT, Inghirami G, Takeshita K (Jan 1998). "Chromosomal mapping to 15q14 and expression analysis of the human MEIS2 homeobox gene". Mamm Genome 8 (12): 951-2. PMID 9383298.  
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: MEIS2 Meis homeobox 2". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=4212.  

Further reading

  • Hui H, Perfetti R (2002). "Pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 regulates pancreas development during embryogenesis and islet cell function in adulthood.". Eur. J. Endocrinol. 146 (2): 129–41. doi:10.1530/eje.0.1460129. PMID 11834421.  
  • Steelman S, Moskow JJ, Muzynski K, et al. (1997). "Identification of a conserved family of Meis1-related homeobox genes.". Genome Res. 7 (2): 142–56. doi:10.1101/gr.7.2.142. PMID 9049632.  
  • Capdevila J, Tsukui T, Rodríquez Esteban C, et al. (2000). "Control of vertebrate limb outgrowth by the proximal factor Meis2 and distal antagonism of BMPs by Gremlin.". Mol. Cell 4 (5): 839–49. doi:10.1016/S1097-2765(00)80393-7. PMID 10619030.  
  • Yang Y, Hwang CK, D'Souza UM, et al. (2000). "Three-amino acid extension loop homeodomain proteins Meis2 and TGIF differentially regulate transcription.". J. Biol. Chem. 275 (27): 20734–41. doi:10.1074/jbc.M908382199. PMID 10764806.  
  • Liu Y, MacDonald RJ, Swift GH (2001). "DNA binding and transcriptional activation by a PDX1.PBX1b.MEIS2b trimer and cooperation with a pancreas-specific basic helix-loop-helix complex.". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (21): 17985–93. doi:10.1074/jbc.M100678200. PMID 11279116.  
  • Fujino T, Yamazaki Y, Largaespada DA, et al. (2001). "Inhibition of myeloid differentiation by Hoxa9, Hoxb8, and Meis homeobox genes.". Exp. Hematol. 29 (7): 856–63. doi:10.1016/S0301-472X(01)00655-5. PMID 11438208.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.  
  • Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, et al. (2004). "Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.". Nat. Genet. 36 (1): 40–5. doi:10.1038/ng1285. PMID 14702039.  
  • Dintilhac A, Bihan R, Guerrier D, et al. (2004). "A conserved non-homeodomain Hoxa9 isoform interacting with CBP is co-expressed with the 'typical' Hoxa9 protein during embryogenesis.". Gene Expr. Patterns 4 (2): 215–22. doi:10.1016/j.modgep.2003.08.006. PMID 15161102.  
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.  

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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