The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on MRTV-3

MRTV-3: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

MRTV-3
MRTV-3 logo.jpg
Type Broadcast radio network
and television network
Country Myanmar
Broadcast area Myanmar and internationally
Owner Ministry of Information, Myanmar
Launch date August 1, 2001
Official Website http://www.mrtv3.net.mm

Myanmar Radio and Television 3 (MRTV-3 or Myanmar TV International) is a Burmese state-owned national and international English-language television channel based in Yangon, Myanmar.

Contents

Overview

The channel, which began broadcasts on August 1, 2001,[1] was financed with a $1 million grant from Japan and is broadcast on the Shin Corp Thaicom 3 satellite.[2] It is the sixth channel to be launched in Myanmar, after MTV1, Myawady, MTV2, MM, MRTV (1969, 1995, 2000, 2000, 2001)[3] The channel is owned by the military government and is viewable in 156 countries, broadcasting 17 hours a day in Myanmar and 8 hours a day in Europe and America.[1]

The service is one of six television channels freely available in Burma, the others being MTV1 (Myanmar), MTV2 (Myanmar), MRTV, MRTV-4 and Myawady Television.[4]

According to U Ye Tun, assistant manager of MTRV-3, the purposes of the channel are threefold: "to inform, to educate and to entertain the public and broadcast healthy programs".[4] However, the channel has been criticised for broadcasting propaganda for the junta.[5][6] A government official said the channel was launched to provide an "objective response" to international media reports about Burma.[7]

A web-based video streaming system was launched on November 10, 2002, and an online newspaper on March 24, 2003. The channel has news exchange agreements with CCTV, NHK, Airang TV and CFI.[1]

Programming

News programmes regulary feature army and political leaders, while entertainment programmes feature ethnic groups singing songs of national unity.[2] Myanmar Mosaic features cookery, cultural and tourism programmes about Burma.

During the 2007 Burmese anti-government protests, the channel criticised Western media outlets for "fabricating stories" about the incident, describing them as ""not happy with peace, stability and development of the [Burmese] nation." A news programme broadcast slides reading "VOA and BBC, sky full of liars. Beware of destructionists, BBC and VOA."[8][9] The channel reported on the protests after several days.

Name confuse

Most people start confusing since March 2010 when the station is renovated and re-branded to Myanmar International, it is still under construction, also it got the designed logo, not just simple logo, but the name refers to MTV International, which was Myanmar International in 1998

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Htun, Kyaw Kyaw & Lwin, Win. Myanmar Country Report, pp. 12-16
  2. ^ a b Lewis, G. Virtual Thailand: The Media and Cultural Politics in Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. Taylor & Francis, 2006. ISBN 978-0415364997.
  3. ^ Junta Launches New PR Offensive, The Irrawaddy, August 1, 2001
  4. ^ a b Broadcasting options expanding, The Myanmar Times, 12-18 March 2007.
  5. ^ Myanmar learns to live with the lights out, IOL, April 10, 2007.
  6. ^ Burma update, The Atlantic.com, September 27, 2007.
  7. ^ World to see the real Myanmar on global TV, The Myanmar Times, December 25, 2000
  8. ^ Burmese TV Blames Protests on Western Broadcasters, VOA, 27 September, 2007.
  9. ^ Youtube clip

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message