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Macrophage scavenger receptor 1
Identifiers
Symbols MSR1; CD204; SCARA1; SR-A; phSR1; phSR2
External IDs OMIM153622 MGI98257 HomoloGene12822 GeneCards: MSR1 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE MSR1 214770 at tn.png
PBB GE MSR1 208423 s at tn.png
PBB GE MSR1 211887 x at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 4481 20288
Ensembl ENSG00000038945 ENSMUSG00000025044
UniProt P21757 Q3U2C3
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_002445 NM_031195
RefSeq (protein) NP_002436 NP_112472
Location (UCSC) Chr 8:
16.01 - 16.09 Mb
Chr 8:
41.08 - 41.13 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Macrophage scavenger receptor 1, also known as MSR1, is a protein which in humans is encoded by the MSR1 gene.[1][2]

MSR1 has also recently been designated CD204 (cluster of differentiation 204).

Contents

Function

This gene encodes the class A macrophage scavenger receptors, which include three different types (1, 2, 3) generated by alternative splicing of this gene. These receptors or isoforms are macrophage-specific trimeric integral membrane glycoproteins and have been implicated in many macrophage-associated physiological and pathological processes including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and host defense. The isoforms type 1 and type 2 are functional receptors and are able to mediate the endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins (LDLs). The isoform type 3 does not internalize modified LDL (acetyl-LDL) despite having the domain shown to mediate this function in the types 1 and 2 isoforms. It has an altered intracellular processing and is trapped within the endoplasmic reticulum, making it unable to perform endocytosis. The isoform type 3 can inhibit the function of isoforms type 1 and type 2 when co-expressed, indicating a dominant negative effect and suggesting a mechanism for regulation of scavenger receptor activity in macrophages.[1]

Biotechnology application

Macrophage scavenger receptor has been shown to mediate adhesion of macrophages and other cell lines to tissue culture plastic.[3]

Interactions

MSR1 has been shown to interact with HSPA1A.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: MSR1 macrophage scavenger receptor 1". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=4481.  
  2. ^ Matsumoto A, Naito M, Itakura H, Ikemoto S, Asaoka H, Hayakawa I, Kanamori H, Aburatani H, Takaku F, Suzuki H (December 1990). "Human macrophage scavenger receptors: primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87 (23): 9133–7. PMID 2251254.  
  3. ^ Robbins AK, Horlick RA (August 1998). "Macrophage scavenger receptor confers an adherent phenotype to cells in culture". BioTechniques 25 (2): 240–4. PMID 9714883.  
  4. ^ Nakamura, Toshinobu; Hinagata Jun-ichi, Tanaka Toshiki, Imanishi Takeshi, Wada Youichiro, Kodama Tatsuhiko, Doi Takefumi (Jan. 2002). "HSP90, HSP70, and GAPDH directly interact with the cytoplasmic domain of macrophage scavenger receptors". Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. (United States) 290 (2): 858–64. doi:10.1006/bbrc.2001.6271. ISSN 0006-291X. PMID 11785981.  

Further reading

  • Asaoka H, Matsumoto A, Itakura H, Kodama T (1993). "[Structural and function of the human macrophage scavenger receptor]". Nippon Rinsho 51 (6): 1677–83. PMID 8391600.  
  • Naito M, Suzuki H, Mori T, et al. (1992). "Coexpression of type I and type II human macrophage scavenger receptors in macrophages of various organs and foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions.". Am. J. Pathol. 141 (3): 591–9. PMID 1519666.  
  • Matsumoto A, Naito M, Itakura H, et al. (1991). "Human macrophage scavenger receptors: primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87 (23): 9133–7. doi:10.1073/pnas.87.23.9133. PMID 2251254.  
  • Emi M, Asaoka H, Matsumoto A, et al. (1993). "Structure, organization, and chromosomal mapping of the human macrophage scavenger receptor gene.". J. Biol. Chem. 268 (3): 2120–5. PMID 8093617.  
  • Ashkenas J, Penman M, Vasile E, et al. (1993). "Structures and high and low affinity ligand binding properties of murine type I and type II macrophage scavenger receptors.". J. Lipid Res. 34 (6): 983–1000. PMID 8394868.  
  • Resnick D, Chatterton JE, Schwartz K, et al. (1996). "Structures of class A macrophage scavenger receptors. Electron microscopic study of flexible, multidomain, fibrous proteins and determination of the disulfide bond pattern of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain.". J. Biol. Chem. 271 (43): 26924–30. doi:10.1074/jbc.271.43.26924. PMID 8900177.  
  • Hsu HY, Hajjar DP, Khan KM, Falcone DJ (1998). "Ligand binding to macrophage scavenger receptor-A induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression by a protein kinase-dependent signaling pathway.". J. Biol. Chem. 273 (2): 1240–6. doi:10.1074/jbc.273.2.1240. PMID 9422792.  
  • Gough PJ, Greaves DR, Gordon S (1998). "A naturally occurring isoform of the human macrophage scavenger receptor (SR-A) gene generated by alternative splicing blocks modified LDL uptake.". J. Lipid Res. 39 (3): 531–43. PMID 9548586.  
  • Teupser D, Thiery J, Seidel D (1999). "Alpha-tocopherol down-regulates scavenger receptor activity in macrophages.". Atherosclerosis 144 (1): 109–15. doi:10.1016/S0021-9150(99)00040-4. PMID 10381284.  
  • Nakamura T, Hinagata J, Tanaka T, et al. (2002). "HSP90, HSP70, and GAPDH directly interact with the cytoplasmic domain of macrophage scavenger receptors.". Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 290 (2): 858–64. doi:10.1006/bbrc.2001.6271. PMID 11785981.  
  • Tomokiyo R, Jinnouchi K, Honda M, et al. (2002). "Production, characterization, and interspecies reactivities of monoclonal antibodies against human class A macrophage scavenger receptors.". Atherosclerosis 161 (1): 123–32. doi:10.1016/S0021-9150(01)00624-4. PMID 11882324.  
  • Xu J, Zheng SL, Komiya A, et al. (2002). "Germline mutations and sequence variants of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 gene are associated with prostate cancer risk.". Nat. Genet. 32 (2): 321–5. doi:10.1038/ng994. PMID 12244320.  
  • Xu J, Zheng SL, Komiya A, et al. (2003). "Common sequence variants of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 gene are associated with prostate cancer risk.". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 72 (1): 208–12. doi:10.1086/345802. PMID 12471593.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.  
  • Kosswig N, Rice S, Daugherty A, Post SR (2003). "Class A scavenger receptor-mediated adhesion and internalization require distinct cytoplasmic domains.". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (36): 34219–25. doi:10.1074/jbc.M303465200. PMID 12819208.  
  • Miller DC, Zheng SL, Dunn RL, et al. (2003). "Germ-line mutations of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 gene: association with prostate cancer risk in African-American men.". Cancer Res. 63 (13): 3486–9. PMID 12839931.  
  • Wang L, McDonnell SK, Cunningham JM, et al. (2003). "No association of germline alteration of MSR1 with prostate cancer risk.". Nat. Genet. 35 (2): 128–9. doi:10.1038/ng1239. PMID 12958598.  
  • Nupponen NN, Wallén MJ, Ponciano D, et al. (2004). "Mutational analysis of susceptibility genes RNASEL/HPC1, ELAC2/HPC2, and MSR1 in sporadic prostate cancer.". Genes Chromosomes Cancer 39 (2): 119–25. doi:10.1002/gcc.10308. PMID 14695991.  
  • Hillman RT, Green RE, Brenner SE (2005). "An unappreciated role for RNA surveillance.". Genome Biol. 5 (2): R8. doi:10.1186/gb-2004-5-2-r8. PMID 14759258.  

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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