Macomb County, Michigan: Wikis

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Macomb County, Michigan
Map of Michigan highlighting Macomb County
Location in the state of Michigan
Map of the U.S. highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location in the U.S.
Seat Mt. Clemens
Largest city Warren
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

570 sq mi (1,476 km²)
480 sq mi (1,243 km²)
89 sq mi (231 km²), 15.68%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

788,149
1,639/sq mi (633/km²)
Founded January 15, 1818 [1]
Website macombcountymi.gov

Macomb County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. The 2000 census recorded its population to be 788,149. In 2008, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that its population had reached 830,663[1]. The county seat is Mt. Clemens[2]. Macomb County is part of the Detroit metropolitan area, though the city of Detroit is located south of 8 Mile Road which separates Macomb County from neighboring Wayne County. Macomb County contains 28 cities, townships and villages. These communities range from mature, inner-ring suburbs like the cities of Warren and Roseville to newer, wealthier locales such as Sterling Heights, Macomb Township, Shelby Township, and Washington Township. The county is named for Alexander Macomb, Jr., an early U.S. Army commander.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 570 square miles (1,476 km²)—480 square miles (1,244 km²) of it is land and 89 square miles (231 km²) of it (15.68%) is water.

Lake St. Clair borders the county on the east.

Far northern parts of the county, such as Richmond and Armada, are often considered to be part of Michigan's Thumb region.

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Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1900 33,244
1910 32,606 −1.9%
1920 38,103 16.9%
1930 77,146 102.5%
1940 107,638 39.5%
1950 184,961 71.8%
1960 405,804 119.4%
1970 625,309 54.1%
1980 694,600 11.1%
1990 717,400 3.3%
2000 788,149 9.9%
Est. 2008 830,663 5.4%

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 788,149 people, 309,203 households, and 210,876 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,640 people per square mile (633/km²). There were 320,276 housing units at an average density of 667 per square mile (257/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.66% White, 2.71% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 2.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 1.77% from two or more races. 1.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.1% were of German, 17.1% Polish, 13.6% Italian, 7.5% Irish and 5.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 87.6% spoke English, 1.7% Italian, 1.4% Polish, 1.2% Spanish, 1.1% Arabic and 1.1% Syriac as their first language.

Two Native American tribes had over 1,000 residents in Macomb County in 2000. The Cherokee tribe counted 1,781 county residents, while 1,038 reported membership in the Chippewa tribe.[3] This is the tribe known as the Ojibwa.

Among Asian ethnic groups, six numbered over 1,000 people in Macomb County. The most numerous were the 5,713 Asian Indians, followed by Filipinos (4,155), Chinese (2,489), Koreans (1,853) Vietnamese (1,557), and Hmong (1,103).[3]

There were 309,203 households out of which 31.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.30% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.80% were non-families. 26.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.10% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 22.80% from 45 to 64, and 13.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $52,102, and the median income for a family was $62,816. Males had a median income of $48,303 versus $30,215 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,446. About 4.00% of families and 5.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.00% of those under age 18 and 6.40% of those age 65 or over.

The years 2000-2005 saw the African American population in Macomb County more than double. This growth largely resulted from an exodus of African Americans from Detroit. By 2005 Census estimates for Macomb County showed it was 5.6% African American, meaning that the growth of the African-American population in the county had been well over 100% in the last five years. The percentage of Asians had risen to 2.9%, largely fueled by the exodus of the Detroit Hmong population northward into Warren. The American Community Survey showed 1.5% of Macomb County's population reporting two or more races.

According to the 2006 American Community Survey the average family size is 3.15. The population of 25 and over is 571,463. 86.9% of that population has graduated from high school, 21% of that population has a Bachelor's degree or higher. About 14.3 of that population is disabled. 12.5% of Macomb's population can speak another language at home.

History

The Ojibwa lived in the area centuries before European contact. The first European explorers arrived in the area during the 17th century. A Moravian colony was established in the county in the late 18th century. They included French fur trappers and missionaries. In addition to the original French and English, later settlers included Germans, Belgians and others who came directly from Europe. In the 19th century the county received many American migrants from New York and New England who were attracted to the area for land and booming jobs.

Macomb County was formally organized on January 15, 1818 as the third county in the Michigan territory. At that time, it covered a much larger area than it does today. In 1819 and 1820, large portions of the county were removed to form the counties of Oakland, Lapeer, Genesee and St. Clair. The county was named in honor of General Alexander Macomb, a highly decorated veteran of the War of 1812.

The county gained fame in the 1980s and '90s as a bellwether of state and national politics. Macomb's large cohort of working-class, socially conservative whites gave it one of the nation's most prominent concentrations of "Reagan Democrats". Outsider candidates with a conservative-populist bent have done well there in the past (e.g. George Wallace in 1968 and Pat Buchanan in 1992).

Parks and recreation

Macomb County is home to more than 130 parks covering 12,000 acres (49 km²) managed by the state, regional, county, and local government. There are four major public parks in the County - Freedom Hill County Park, Macomb Orchard Trail, Metro Beach Metropark, and Stony Creek Metropark. The county also has 31 miles of shoreline and over 100 marinas.

Government

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

In May 2008, Macomb County voters approved the inclusion of a County Executive in a new charter to be submitted to the voters by 2010. A charter commission was elected in November 2008 for the purpose of drafting a charter for submission to Governor Granholm, which was submitted and approved and placed on the November 2009 ballot. The Charter passed with a 60.4% to 39.6% margin.[4]

Macomb County Elected Officials

Noted people from Macomb County

Actors/Actresses

Athletes

Musicians

Other

Cities, villages, and townships

Townships

High schools

Transportation

Air

Major highways

I-94.svg
(O'Hara Freeway) runs east-west through Detroit and serves Ann Arbor to the west (where it continues to Chicago) and Port Huron to the northeast. The stretch of the current I-94 freeway from Ypsilanti to Detroit was one of the first American limited-access freeways. Henry Ford built it to link his factories at Willow Run and Dearborn during World War II. It was called the Willow Run Expressway.
I-696.svg
(Walter Reuther Freeway) runs east-west from the junction of I-96 and I-275, providing a route through the northern suburbs of Detroit.
M-3.svg
M-3 Gratiot Avenue (M-3) is a major road that runs from Port Huron to downtown Detroit.
M-19.svg
M-19
M-29.svg
M-29
M-53.svg
M-53 (Christopher Columbus Freeway from Sterling Heights to Washington), more commonly known as the Van Dyke Expressway or Van Dyke Freeway. Continues as Van Dyke Road or Van Dyke Avenue north to Port Austin and south through Warren to Gratiot Avenue in Detroit.
M-59.svg
M-59 (Veterans Memorial Freeway from Utica to Pontiac), continues east as Hall Road to Clinton Township and west as various surface roads to I-96 near Howell
M-97.svg
M-97
M-102.svg
M-102 8 Mile Road, known by many due to the film 8 Mile, forms the dividing line between Detroit on the south and the suburbs of Macomb and Oakland counties on the north. It is also known as Baseline Road outside of Detroit, because it coincides with the baseline used in surveying Michigan; that baseline is also the boundary for a number of Michigan counties as well as the boundary for Illinois and Wisconsin. Designated as M-102 for much of its length in Wayne County.

Other Major Roads

  • Jefferson Avenue is a scenic highway that runs parallel to the shore of the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair. It is also the principal thoroughfare for the Grosse Pointes, where it is called Lake Shore Drive. Another important dividing line between Detroit and the city of Grosse Pointe Park is Alter Road, where portions of some intersecting streets have been reconfigured or walled-off in order to thwart vehicular and pedestrian movement from Detroit into Grosse Pointe Park.
  • "Mile" roads: Surface street navigation in Metro Detroit is commonly anchored by "mile roads," major east-west surface streets that are spaced at one-mile intervals and increment as one travels north and away from the city center. Mile roads sometimes have two names, the numeric name (ex. 15 Mile Road) used in Macomb County and a local name (ex. Maple Road) used in Oakland County mostly.

References

External links

Coordinates: 42°40′N 82°55′W / 42.67°N 82.91°W / 42.67; -82.91


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

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Macomb County, Michigan
Map
File:Map of Michigan highlighting Macomb County.png
Location in the state of Michigan
Map of the USA highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded January 15, 1818 [1]
Seat Mt. Clemens
Largest City Warren
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 15.68%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

788149
Website: macombcountymi.gov

Macomb County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census the population was 788,149. The 2006 census estimate placed Macomb's population at 832,861. The county seat is Mt. Clemens6. Macomb County is part of the Detroit metro area, though the actual city of Detroit is located in neighboring Wayne County, south of 8 Mile Road. Macomb County is comprised of 28 cities, townships and villages. These communities range from mature, inner-ring suburbs like the cities of Warren and Roseville to newer, wealthier locales such as Sterling Heights, Macomb Township and Washington Township. The county was named for an early U.S. Army commander, Alexander Macomb.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 570 square miles (1,476 km²)—480 square miles (1,244 km²) of it is land and 89 square miles (231 km²) of it (15.68%) is water.

Lake St. Clair borders the county on the east.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 788,149 people, 309,203 households, and 210,876 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,640 people per square mile (633/km²). There were 320,276 housing units at an average density of 667 per square mile (257/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.66% White, 2.71% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 2.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 1.77% from two or more races. 1.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.1% were of German, 17.1% Polish, 13.6% Italian, 7.5% Irish and 5.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 87.6% spoke English, 1.7% Italian, 1.4% Polish, 1.2% Spanish, 1.1% Arabic and 1.1% Syriac as their first language.

Two Native American tribes had over 1000 people who self-identified with the tribe in Macomb County in 2000. 1781 county residents indicated that they were Cherokee on the census form. 1038 did the same for being Chippewa.[1] This is the tribe known as the Ojibwa. It should be kept in mind that whether someone marked "Ojibwa", "Chippewa" or "Anishabaag" it was all grouped together in the reported counts.

Among Asians groups, Macomb County has six with over 1000 people. The most numerous were the 5713 Asian Indians. Filipinos came in a close second numbering 4155, this includes many children who are Filipino on their mother's side and European-American on their father's side. Chinese number 2489. Koreans numbered 1853, while Vietnamese numbered 1557. There were 1103, the only Asian group without a nation to be so recognized.[2] It should be remembered that people from Iran and further west are classed as whites.

There were 309,203 households out of which 31.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.30% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.80% were non-families. 26.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.10% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 22.80% from 45 to 64, and 13.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $52,102, and the median income for a family was $62,816. Males had a median income of $48,303 versus $30,215 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,446. About 4.00% of families and 5.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.00% of those under age 18 and 6.40% of those age 65 or over.

The years 2000-2005 saw the African American population in Macomb County more than double. This growth largely resulted from an exodus of African Americans from Detroit. By 2005 Census estimates for Macomb County showed it was 5.6% African American, meaning that the growth of the African-American population in the county had been well over 100% in the last 5 years. The percentage of Asians had risen to 2.9%, largely fueled by the exodus of the eastside Detroit Hmong population northward into Warren. The American Community Survey showed 1.5% of Macomb County's population reporting two or more races.

According to the 2006 American Community Survey the average family size is 3.15. The population of 25 and over is 571,463. 86.9% of that population has graduating from High school, 21% of that population has a Bachelor's degree or higher. About 14.3 of that population is disabled. 12.5% of Macomb's population can speak another language at home.

History

The Ojibwa were the first settlers in the area. The first Europeans arrived in the area during the 17th century. A Moravian colony was established in the county in the late 18th Century. They included French fur trappers and missionaries. In addition to the original French and English, later settlers included Germans, Belgians and others who came directly from Europe.

Macomb County was formally organized on January 15, 1818 as the third county in the Michigan territory. At that time, it covered a much larger area than it does today. In 1819 and 1820, large portions of the county were removed to form the counties of Oakland, Lapeer, Genesee and St. Clair. The county was named in honor of General Alexander Macomb a highly decorated veteran of the War of 1812.

The county gained fame in the 1980s and '90s as a bellwether of state and national politics. Macomb's large cohort of working-class, socially conservative whites gave it one of the nation's most prominent concentrations of "Reagan Democrats", and outsider candidates with a conservative-populist bent have done well there in the past (e.g. George Wallace in 1968 and Pat Buchanan in 1992).

Parks and recreation

Macomb County is home to more than 130 parks covering 12,000 acres (49 km²) managed by the state, regional, county, and local government. There are four major public parks in the County - Freedom Hill County Park, Macomb Orchard Trail, Metro Beach Metropark, and Stony Creek Metropark. The county also has 31 miles of shoreline and over 100 marinas.

Government

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Macomb County Elected Officials

(information as of February 2006)

Noted people from Macomb County

Actors/Actresses

Athletes

Musicians

Other

Cities, villages, and townships

References

External links

Coordinates: 42°40′N 82°55′W / 42.67, -82.91

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Macomb County, Michigan. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Macomb County, MichiganRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Michigan  +
Short name Macomb County  +

This article uses material from the "Macomb County, Michigan" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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