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Location of Madrid electoral district in Spain

Madrid is one of the 52 electoral districts (circunscripciones) used for the Spanish Congress of Deputies - the lower chamber of the Spanish Parliament, the Cortes Generales. It has the largest electorate of all the 52 districts. Madrid is the largest city. Other municipalities with an electorate over 100,000 are (in descending order) Móstoles, Leganés, Alcalá de Henares, Fuenlabrada, Alcorcón and Getafe. [1]

Traditionally the two main parties candidates for Prime Minister are the heads of the Madrid list for their respective parties.

Contents

Boundaries and electoral system

Under Article 68 of the Spanish constitution [2] the boundaries must be the same as the province of Madrid and under Article 140 this can only be altered with the approval of congress. Voting is on the basis of universal suffrage in a secret ballot. The electoral system used is closed list proportional representation with seats allocated using the D'Hondt method. Only lists which poll 3% or more of all valid votes cast, including votes "en blanco" i.e. for "none of the above" can be considered for seats. Under article 12 of the constitution, the minimum voting age is 18.

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Eligibility

Article 67.3 of the Spanish Constitution prohibits dual membership of the Cortes and regional assemblies, meaning that candidates must resign from Regional Assemblies if elected. Article 70 also makes active judges, magistrates, public defenders, serving military personnel, active police officers and members of constitutional and electoral tribunals ineligible. [2]

Number of members

In the general elections of 1977, 1979 and 1982 Madrid returned 32 members. That figure was increased to 33 members for the 1986 General Election, to 34 members for the 1993 election and then to its current figure of 35 from the 2004 General Election.

Under Spanish electoral law, all provinces are entitled to a minimum of 2 seats with a remaining 248 seats apportioned according to population. [3] These laws are laid out in detail in the 1985 electoral law. (Ley Orgánica del Régimen Electoral General) The practical effect of this law has been to overrepresent smaller provinces at the expense of larger provinces like Madrid.

In 2004 for example Spain had 34,571,831 voters giving an average of 98,777 voters per deputy [4]. In Madrid however the number of voters per deputy was 127,377[5] the second largest ratio after Barcelona. In contrast the ratio was 38,714 and 26,177 respectively in the smallest provinces of Teruel [6] and Soria. [7]

Party strength by municipality

Generally certain patterns have emerged in recent elections. The Popular Party (PP) normally polls best in the City of Madrid, with the PSOE polling best in the smaller municipalities, particularly those in the 'sur metropolitano' (South Metropolitan region) area which consists of the satellite towns to the immediate south and of Madrid. [8]

Within the Madrid autonomous community, PP generally polled best in the municipalities in the north and west of the community, while PSOE does best in the south and east of the community. IU normally failed to break the 10% barrier, but did do relatively well in many of the smaller municipalities and in one of them, Berzosa del Lozoya, in the north of the autonomous community, outpolled the other parties, albeit by just one vote out of 106 cast.

Exactly the same pattern was evident in 2004 within Madrid city itself with PP polling best in the districts in the north western half of the city and PSOE doing best in the south eastern half. PP polled best in the districts of Chamartín (67.9%), Salamanca (67.7%) and Chamberí (64.9%) while PSOE's best vote shares came in the Vallecas districts where they polled 61.4% in Puente de Vallecas and 56.9% in Villa de Vallecas. IU's best result was in Centro where they polled 10.4%. [9]

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Party strength in largest municipalities

Municipality PP PSOE IU
Madrid Autonomous Community 46.0 45.0 6.6
Madrid 48.7 42.7 6.4
Móstoles 39.0 51.7 6.5
Leganés 33.8 54.9 8.4
Alcalá de Henares 40.9 48.9 7.1
Fuenlabrada 31.5 59.0 6.5
Alcorcón 39.0 51.7 6.5
Getafe 33.8 53.7 9.8
Torrejón de Ardoz 38.0 50.1 7.0
Alcobendas 46.1 44.0 4.9
Coslada 32.9 52.1 9.8
Parla 26.5 62.3 7.0
Pozuelo de Alarcón 62.8 29.3 3.2

Only municipalities with more than 50,000 voters shown.

Source: [10]

Summary of seats won 1977-2004

1977 1979 1982 1986 1989 1993 1996 2000 2004 2008
Seats 32 32 32 33 33 34 34 34 35 35
Democratic Centre Union (UCD) 11 12 1
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 11 12 18 15 12 13 11 12 16 15
United Left (IU) 4 4 1 2 5 5 6 3 2 1
People's Party (PP) 3 3 11 11 12 16 17 19 17 18
Popular Socialist Party (PSP) 3
National Union (UN) 1
Democratic and Social Centre (CDS) 1 5 4
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 1

Seats shown for the People's Party include seats won by their predecessors, the Popular Alliance and the Popular Coalition before 1989. Seats shown for United Left include seats won by the Communist Party of Spain before 1986.

Vote share summary 1977-2004

1977 1979 1982 1986 1989 1993 1996 2000 2004
Democratic Centre Union (UCD) 32.0 33.1 3.4
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 31.7 33.3 52.1 40.8 33.5 34.5 31.4 33.1 44.1
United Left (IU) 10.7 13.5 5.0 6.0 15.4 14.6 16.4 9.1 6.4
People's Party (PP) 10.5 8.6 32.3 32.0 34.2 43.9 49.3 52.5 45.0
Popular Socialist Party (PSP) 9.2
National Union (UN) 4.8 0.8
Democratic and Social Centre (CDS) 4.1 13.9 11.0 3.0 0.4 0.1 0.2

2008 Election

As traditionally the prime ministerial candidate of each party is the leader of the Madrid list, PSOE's, PP's and IU's lists will be led by Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, Mariano Rajoy and Gaspar Llamazares respectively. In many political parties it is usually the number two on these lists who are considered the leader and left for discussion within the regional party branches. Up to December 2008 it is only clear that current Second Vice-President Pedro Solbes has been offered this position [11] and that current confederal environment Secretary of the Workers' Commissions trade union, Joaquin Nieto has been offered this position for IU [12] Pending ratificton by the Regional and Federal Political Councils of the organisation. Manuel Pizzarro, former Chairman of ENDESA, was chosen to run as number two in the madrid list of the Peoples's Party, his draft was announced at the time that current Mayor Madrid Alberto Ruiz Gallardón was rejected to take part in the party list.

Results

PSOE had their best result in Madrid since 1982 although the PP still narrowly retained the top position. IU lost a seat and had their biggest drop in percentage terms in any of the 52 districts.

2004 General Election

e • d Summary of the 14 March 2004 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
People's Party (Partido Popular) 1,576,636 45.02 17 Mariano Rajoy, Rodrigo Rato (Resigned), Carlos Aragonés, Rogelio Baón, Ismael Bardisa, Gabriel Elgorriaga, Elena Garcia-Alcañiz, Fernando López-Amór, Jesús López-Medel, Mario Mingo, Eugenio Nassare, Beatriz Rodríguez Salmones, Soraya Sáenz de Santamaria, Julio Sanchez Fierro, Roberto Soravilla, Juan Carlos Vera, Francisco José Villar
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 1,544,676 44.11 16 José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, María Fernández, Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba, Mercedes Cabrera, Cristina Narbona, José Acosta Cubero, Elviro Aranda, Juan Antonio Barrios Rosa Blanco, Lucila Corral, Juan Julián Eloa, Luis Fernández, Dolores Garcia-Hierro, Antonio Gutierrez, Antonio Hernando, Joaquín Leguina, Diego López Garrido
United Left 225,109 6.43 2 Gaspar Llamazares, Ángel Pérez (Resigned), Montserrat Muñoz
Los Verdes 19,600 0.56 0
Others 63,719 3.88 0

2000 General Election

e • d Summary of the 12 March 2000 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
People's Party (Partido Popular) 1,625,831 52.52 19 Jose Maria Aznar, Rafael Arias-Salgado
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 1,023,212 33.06 12 Joaquin Almunia, Cristina Alberdi
United Left 282,180 9.12 3 Francisco Frutos
Others 106,130 3.40 0

1996 General Election

e • d Summary of the 3 March 1996 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
People's Party (Partido Popular) 1,642,489 49.29 17 Jose Maria Aznar, Rafael Arias-Salgado
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 1,046,904 31.42 11 Felipe Gonzalez
United Left 547,901 16.44 6 Julio Anguita
Others 52,825 1.60 0

1993 General Election

This election saw the CDS fall just short of the 3% threshold needed to secure representation and as a result they failed to win the seat that they would have won had there been no threshold. To date this was the only election where the threshold has cost a party representation.

e • d Summary of the 6 June 1993 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
People's Party (Partido Popular) 1,373,042 43.92 16 Jose Maria Aznar, Rafael Arias-Salgado
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 1,093,015 34.96 13 Felipe Gonzalez
United Left 455,685 14.58 5 Julio Anguita
Democratic and Social Centre 93,347 2.99 0
Others 80,507 2.60 0

1989 General Election

e • d Summary of the 29 October 1989 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
People's Party (Partido Popular) 919,357 34.22 12 Jose Maria Aznar
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 899,723 33.49 12 Felipe Gonzalez
United Left 414,392 15.42 5 Julio Anguita
Democratic and Social Centre 295,189 11.00 4 Adolfo Suarez
Others 130,751 4.90 0

1986 General Election

e • d Summary of the 22 June 1986 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 1,054,730 40.81 15 Felipe Gonzalez
People's Party (Partido Popular) 826,206 31.97 11 Manuel Fraga
Democratic and Social Centre 295,189 13.94 5 Adolfo Suarez
United Left 155,932 6.03 5 Gerardo Iglesias
Others 162,634 6.30 0

1982 General Election

e • d Summary of the 28 October 1982 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 1,439,137 52.09 18 Felipe Gonzalez
Popular Alliance (Alianza Popular) 826,206 32.26 11 Manuel Fraga
Communist Party of Spain (Partido Comunista de España) 137,459 4,98 1 Santiago Carrillo
Democratic and Social Centre (Centro Democrático y Social) 113,384 4.10 1 Adolfo Suarez
Union of the Democratic Centre (Unión de Centro Democrático) 92,508 3.35 1 Landelino Lavilla
New Force (Fuerza Nueva) 22,602 0.82 0
Others 54,735 2.00 0

1979 General Election

e • d Summary of the 1 March 1979 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 769,328 33.34 12 Felipe Gonzalez
Union of the Democratic Centre (Unión de Centro Democrático) 764,830 33.14 12 Adolfo Suarez
Communist Party of Spain (Partido Comunista de España) 310,496 13,46 4 Santiago Carrillo
Democratic Coalition (Coalicion Democratica) 198,345 8.60 3 Manuel Fraga, José María de Areilza
New Force (Fuerza Nueva) 110,730 4.80 1 Blas Piñar
Others 145,224 6.30 0

1977 General Election

e • d Summary of the 15 June 1977 Congress of Deputies election results in Madrid.
Parties and alliances Votes % Seats Members elected
Union of the Democratic Centre (Unión de Centro Democrático) 737,699 31.95 12 Adolfo Suarez
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) 731,380 31.68 11 Felipe Gonzalez
Communist Party of Spain (Partido Comunista de España) 247,038 10,70 3 Santiago Carrillo
Popular Alliance (Spain) (Alianza Popular) 242,077 10.48 3 Manuel Fraga
Popular Socialist Party (Partido Socialista Popular) 211,440 9.16 3 Enrique Tierno Glavan
Others 133,171 5.80 0

Source: [13]

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References


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