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Magnesium alloy: Wikis

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Figure 1: Number of scientific articles which have terms AZ91 or AZ31 in the abstract.

Magnesium alloys are mixtures of magnesium with other metals (called an alloy), often aluminum, zinc, manganese, silicon, copper, rare earths and zirconium. Magnesium is the lightest structural metal. Magnesium alloys have hexagonal lattice structure, which effect fundamentals properties of these alloys. Plastic deformation of hexagonal lattice is more complicated than cubic latticed metals like aluminum, copper and steel. Therefore magnesium alloys are typical used as cast alloys, but research of wrought alloys is more extensive after 2003.

Contents

Designation

Magnesium alloys names are often given by two letters following by two numbers. Letters tells main alloying elements (A = aluminum, Z = zinc, M = manganese, S = silicon). Numbers tells nominal compositions of main alloying elements respectively. Marking AZ91 mean magnesium alloy where is roughly 9 weight percent aluminum and 1 weight percent zinc. Exact composition should be confirmed from the standards.

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Cast alloys

Magnesium casting proof stress is typically 75-200 MPa, tensile strength 135-285 MPa and elongation 2-10%. Typical density is 1800 kg/m3 and Young's modulus is 42 GPa.[1] Most common cast alloys are:

AZ63
AZ81
AZ91
AM50
ZK51
ZK61
ZE41
ZC63
HK31
HZ32
QE22
QH21
WE54
WE43
Elektron 21

Wrought alloys

Magnesium casting proof stress is typically 70-240 MPa, tensile strength 135-305 MPa and elongation 4-11%. Most common wrought alloys are:

AZ31
AZ61
AZ80
Elektron 675
ZK60
HK31
HM21

Wrought magnesium alloys have a special feature. They compressive proof strength is smaller than tensile proof strength. After the forming wrought magnesium alloys have string texture in the deformation direction, which increase tensile proof strength. In compression the proof strength is smaller because of twinning, which happen more easily in compression than in tension in magnesium alloys because of the hexagonal lattice structure.

Named alloys

Aluminium alloys with magnesium

References


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