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Magnesium bromide[1]
Cadmium-iodide-3D-balls.png
Identifiers
CAS number 7789-48-2 Yes check.svgY,(anhydrous)
[13446-53-2] (hexahydrate)
[75198-45-7] (decahydrate)
PubChem 522691
Properties
Molecular formula MgBr2 (anhydrous)
MgBr2·2H2O (hexahydrate)
Molar mass 184.113 g/mol (anhydrous)
292.204 g/mol (hexahydrate)
Appearance white hygroscopic hexagonal crystals (anhydrous) colorless monoclinic crystals (hexahydrate)
Density 3.72 g/cm3 (anhydrous)
2.07 g/cm3 (hexahydrate)
Melting point

711°C (anhydrous)
172.4°C, decomposes (hexahydrate)

Solubility in water 102 g/100 mL (anhydrous)
316 g/100 mL (0 °C, hexahydrate)
Solubility ethanol: 6.9 g/100 mL (20 °C)
Structure
Crystal structure Rhombohedral, hP3, SpaceGroup = P-3m1, No. 164
Coordination
geometry
octahedral
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
-524.3 kJ·mol-1
Standard molar
entropy
So298
117.2 J·mol-1·K-1
Hazards
EU Index Not listed
Related compounds
Other anions magnesium fluoride
magnesium chloride
magnesium iodide
Other cations calcium bromide
strontium bromide
barium bromide
 Yes check.svgY (what is this?)  (verify)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Magnesium bromide (MgBr2) is a chemical compound of magnesium and bromine that is white and deliquescent. It is often used as a mild sedative and as an anticonvulsant for treatment of nervous disorders. [2]

Magnesium bromide is an ionic compound (a salt). The metal ion is Magnesium and the nonmetal ion is Bromide.

References

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 4–67, ISBN 0849305942  
  2. ^ Pradyot Patnaik. Handbook of Inorganic Chemicals. McGraw-Hill, 2002, ISBN 0070494398
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