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Mai, the Psychic Girl
Maithepsychicgirl1.jpg
The first issue.

(Mai)
Genre Supernatural
Manga
Author Kazuya Kudo (story)
Ryoichi Ikegami (art)
Publisher Japan Shogakukan, Media Factory
English publisher USA Eclipse Comics, Viz Media
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Japan Weekly Shōnen Sunday
Original run 19851986
Volumes 3 (28 comic books)
Anime and Manga Portal

Mai, the Psychic Girl, known simply as Mai (?) in Japan, is a manga written by Kazuya Kudō and illustrated by Ryoichi Ikegami.

The main character is Mai Kuju, a 14-year-old Japanese girl with powerful psychic abilities. She is being pursued by the Wisdom Alliance, an organization which secretly strives to control the world. The alliance already controls four other powerful psychic children, and it has hired the Kaieda Intelligence Agency to capture Mai.

Contents

English release

Mai, the Psychic Girl is one of, if not the, first manga series to be fully published in English.[1] It, along with The Legend of Kamui and Area 88, were published in North America by Eclipse Comics and Viz Comics in a bi-weekly comic book format starting on May 26, 1987.[2] As it was one of the forerunners of manga popularity in the West, Mai was chosen for localization due its middle-ground artwork: neither "too Japanese or too American".[2] It was present in the "flipped" format that was the norm with early localized manga. Mai proved popular enough that second printings were needed of the first two issues.[2].

The series was later re-released in three volumes as Mai, the Psychic Girl: Perfect Collection.

Canceled film adaptation

In 1991, The Hollywood Reporter ran the article on film director Tim Burton attached to direct a film adaptation of the character with Francis Ford Coppola as a producer and songs by Sparks,[1] however it didn't happen because the film's production company Carolco Pictures (which made Terminator2), went bankrupt after the release of Cutthroat Island.

Notes and references

  1. ^ Several manga have been published in English before Mai, but they were all one-shots or series interrupted before their completion.
  2. ^ a b c Gravett, Paul. Manga: 60 Years of Japanese Comics. New York: Collins Design, 2004. ISBN 1-85669-391-0.

Further reading

  • Napier, Susan J.. "Vampires, Psychic Girls, Flying Women and Sailor Scouts". in Martinez, Dolores P.. The Worlds of Japanese Popular Culture: Gender, Shifting Boundaries and Global Culture. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521631289. 

External links


Template:Safesubst:

(Mai)
GenreSupernatural
Manga
Written by Kazuya Kudō (story)
Ryoichi Ikegami (art)
Published by Japan Shogakukan, Media Factory
English publisher USA Eclipse Comics, Viz Media
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Japan Weekly Shōnen Sunday
Original run 19851986
Volumes 6 (28 comic books)
Anime and Manga Portal

Mai, the Psychic Girl, known simply as Mai (?) in Japan, is a manga written by Kazuya Kudō and illustrated by Ryoichi Ikegami.

The main character is Mai Kuju, a 14-year-old Japanese girl with powerful psychic abilities. She is being pursued by the Wisdom Alliance, an organization which secretly strives to control the world. The alliance already controls four other powerful psychic children, and it has hired the Kaieda Intelligence Agency to capture Mai.

Contents

English release

Mai, the Psychic Girl is one of, if not the, first manga series to be fully published in English.[1] It, along with The Legend of Kamui and Area 88, were published in North America by Eclipse Comics and Viz Comics in a bi-weekly comic book format starting on May 26, 1987.[2] As it was one of the forerunners of manga popularity in the West, Mai was chosen for localization due its middle-ground artwork: neither "too Japanese or too American".[2] It was present in the "flipped" format that was the norm with early localized manga. Mai proved popular enough that second printings were needed of the first two issues.[2].

The series was later re-released in three volumes as Mai, the Psychic Girl: Perfect Collection.

Film adaptation

In the late eighties and early nineties, work was begun on a film adaptation. It was to be directed by Tim Burton and feature music by Sparks, but the project fell through, even though Sparks had completed work on the soundtrack.[3] Burton has since gotten the rights back, and is reportedly wanting to make it "a priority".[4]

Notes and references

  1. ^ Several manga have been published in English before Mai, but they were all one-shots or series interrupted before their completion.
  2. ^ a b c Gravett, Paul. Manga: 60 Years of Japanese Comics. New York: Collins Design, 2004. ISBN 1-85669-391-0.
  3. ^ Galliano, Joseph (2009-10-30). "Striking Sparks with Bergman – The Mael brothers’ new album takes a poke at Hollywood". The Times. http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/music/classical/article6895801.ece. Retrieved 24 April 2010. 
  4. ^ http://www.latinoreview.com/news/exclusive-tim-burton-gets-mai-back-10005

Further reading

  • Napier, Susan J.. "Vampires, Psychic Girls, Flying Women and Sailor Scouts". In Martinez, Dolores P.. The Worlds of Japanese Popular Culture: Gender, Shifting Boundaries and Global Culture. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521631289. 

External links








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