The Full Wiki

Mandrill: Wikis

  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mandrill
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Cercopithecidae
Genus: Mandrillus
Species: M. sphinx
Binomial name
Mandrillus sphinx
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Distribution of the Mandrill in Africa

The Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) is a primate of the Cercopithecidae (Old-world monkeys) family, closely related to the baboons and even more closely to the Drill. Both the Mandrill and the Drill were once classified as baboons in genus Papio, but recent research has determined that they should be separated into their own genus, Mandrillus. The Mandrill is the world's largest species of monkey.

Contents

Description

The Mandrill is recognized by its olive-colored fur and the colorful face and rump of males, a coloration that grows stronger with sexual maturity; females have duller colours. This coloration becomes more pronounced as the monkey becomes excited and is likely to be an example of sexual selection. The coloration on the rump is thought to enhance visibility in the thick vegetation of the rainforest and aids in group movement.

Males average 25–35 kg (55-77 lb), females less than half that weigh (11-14 kg, or 25-30 lb). Unusually large males can weigh 50 kg (110 lb).[2][3][4] The average male is 81-90 cm (32-36 in) and the female is 56-66 cm (22-26 in), with the tail adding another 5–8 cm (2–3 in).[5][6] They can survive up to 31 years in captivity. Females reach sexual maturity at about 3.5 years.

Habitat

The Mandrill is found in the tropical rainforests and occasionally woodlands of southern Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, and Congo. Its distribution is bounded by the Sanaga River to the north and the Ogooué and Ivindo rivers to the east. Recent research suggests that mandrill populations north and south of the Ogooué river are so genetically different as to be separate subspecies.

Behavior

Mandrills are social animals and live in large groups, primarily including females and young and led by a single dominant male. Most adult males are solitary. It is difficult to accurately estimate group size in the forest, but filming a group crossing a gap between two forest patches or crossing a road is a reliable way of estimating group size. The largest group verifiably observed in this way contained over 1300 individuals, in Lopé National Park, Gabon—the largest aggregation of non-human primates ever recorded [1].

The Mandrill is an omnivore and acquires its food by foraging (mainly plants, insects and smaller animals) from the ground as it is terrestrial. Although the Mandrill does not normally hunt larger prey, males have been observed to hunt and consume duiker (a small antelope).

Its main natural predators are leopards, pythons and humans. Attacks on subadults by African crowned eagles have also been reported. Mandrills are hunted for food throughout their range, either with guns or using dogs and nets. In Cameroon, habitat loss to agriculture is also a threat.

A large group of mandrills can cause significant damage to crops in a very short time, and where common they are widely perceived as pests.

Reproduction

Mandrill at Singapore Zoo

The gestation (pregnancy) time for the Mandrill is 6–7 months and young are usually born between January and April. However, the mandrill mates throughout the year during the estrous cycle, which occurs once every 33 days. The interbirth interval is typically 13–14 months.

Courtship

Canadian Researcher William Sommers has found that during courtship, the female will walk after the male. If the male is interested he will stop and turn towards her. He will then mount her and they will copulate.

Parenting

Mandrill infants are born with their eyes open and with fur. They have a black coat and pink skin for the first two months. They cling to their mother's belly immediately and can support their own weight. Mothers form bonds with their children. These bonds last into adulthood with the daughters, while the bonds with the sons last only until his sexual maturity. These bonds entail the two sitting with each other and grooming each other.

In popular culture

  • In the drugs episode of the British mockumentary Brass Eye, satirist Chris Morris, explained that "it's legal to buy and sell drugs, if you do it through a mandrill."
  • Spark Mandrill from Mega Man X is, of course, a mandrill.
  • In the comedy sequel Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls a mandrill is seen guarding the hut, only to fall asleep and let Ace Ventura sneak in.

References

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Database error article)

From LoveToKnow 1911

(There is currently no text in this page)


Simple English

Mandrill
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Cercopithecidae
Genus: Mandrillus
Species: M. sphinx
Binomial name
Mandrillus sphinx
(Linnaeus, 1758)

The Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) are the most colourful primates in the world. The skin colours brighten as the animal gets more excited.

Description

Males have an orange/yellow beard and an unmistakable bright red and blue snout and rump. Females and juveniles have a duller blue snout and a buff beard. Mandrills can live for over 46 years. They feed on fruits, leaves, roots, seeds, nuts, greens and invertebrates.

Habitat

Mandrills live in Cameroon and Gabon. Mandrills live in dense rainforest and coastal forests, although they will sometimes venture into savannah.

Behaviour

There are two distinct group types in mandrill society. One type consists of one very large male and an average of 15 females. The other group-type is multi male and multi female, and can include up to 200 members. Mandrills are predominantly terrestrial. They sleep in trees at a different site each night.








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message