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Mango
Ripe Banganpalli mangoes from Guntur, India.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Angiospermae
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Sapindales
Family: Anacardiaceae
Genus: Mangifera
.Mangoes belong to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous species of tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae, of which Mangifera indica, or the common mango, is commonly cultivated and used for food.^ Commercial potential: The mango is the apple (or peach) of the tropics, and one of the most commonly eaten fruits in tropical countries around the world.
  • MANGO Fruit Facts 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.crfg.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It is a matter of astonishment to many that the luscious mango, Mangifera indica L., one of the most celebrated of tropical fruits, is a member of the family Anacardiaceae–notorious for embracing a number of highly poisonous plants.

^ It is a matter of astonishment to many that the luscious Jamaican mango, Mangifera indica L., one of the most celebrated of tropical Jamaican mango fruits, is a member of the family Anacardiaceaenotorious for embracing a number of highly poisonous Jamaican mango plants.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The mango is indigenous to India.[1] .Cultivated in many tropical and subtropical regions and distributed widely in the world, mango is one of the most extensively exploited fruits for food, juice, flavor, fragrance and color.^ Jamaican mango is regarded as the queen of Jamaican mango fruits in tropical areas of the world.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fresh and juice mango flavor.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ Since its discovery, mango groves have spread to many parts of the world, though mostly the tropical and sub-tropical climates.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

In several cultures, its fruit and leaves are ritually used as floral decorations at weddings, public celebrations and religious ceremonies.

Contents

Description

Photo of branch of mango tree displaying flowers with a building in the background
Mango inflorescence and immature fruit
Photo of one whole and one split mango displaying its seed, which is approximately 1/3 the size of the entire fruit
The seed of mango can be hairy or fibrous
.Mango trees (Mangifera indica L.) grow 35–40 m (115–131 ft) tall, with a crown radius of 10 m (33 ft).^ The Jamaican mango or scientifically Mangifera indica is sometimes called Jamaican mangot, manga and Jamaican mango is native to southern Asia, especially Burma and eastern India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Blooming and Pollination Mango trees less than 10 years old may flower and fruit regularly every year.

^ Propagation Mango trees grow readily from seed.

.The mango tree is long-lived; some specimens still fruit after 300 years.^ The Jamaican mango tree is long-lived, some specimens being known to be 300 years old and still Jamaican mango fruiting.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango trees will bear in 2 to 3 years.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango tree is long-lived with some specimens known to be over 300 years old and still Jamaican mango fruiting.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In deep soil the taproot descends to a depth of 6 m (20 ft) and the profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots also send down many anchor roots which penetrate several feet of soil.^ In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of 20 ft (6 in), the profuse, wide-spreading, feeder root system also sends down many anchor roots which penetrate for several feet.
  • Mango 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.hort.purdue.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In deep soil the taproot descends to a depth of 20 ft, and the profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots also send down many anchor roots which penetrate for several feet.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The young trees should be placed in prepared and enriched holes at least 2 ft (60 cm) deep and wide, and 3/4 of the top should be cut off.

.The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, 15–35 cm (5.9–14 in) long and 6–16 cm (2.4–6.3 in) broad; when the leaves are young they are orange-pink, rapidly changing to a dark glossy red, then dark green as they mature.^ Foliage: The leaves are dark green above and pale below, usually red while young.
  • MANGO Fruit Facts 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.crfg.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The leaves are dark green above and pale below, usually red while young.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The skin is leathery, waxy, smooth, fairly thick, aromatic and ranges from light-or dark-green to clear yellow, yellow-orange, yellow and reddish-pink, or more or less blushed with bright-or dark-red or purple-red, with fine yellow, greenish or reddish dots, and thin or thick whitish, gray or purplish bloom, when fully ripe.

.The flowers are produced in terminal panicles 10–40 cm (3.9–16 in) long; each flower is small and white with five petals 5–10 mm (0.20–0.39 in) long, with a mild sweet odor suggestive of lily of the valley.^ Flowers: The yellowish or reddish flowers are borne in inflorescences which appear at branch terminals, in dense panicles of up to 2000 minute flowers.
  • MANGO Fruit Facts 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.crfg.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The elliptic fruit, 3 1/4 to 4 in (8-10 cm) long, has yellow skin and fiberless, though rather thin, flesh.

^ Small, greenish Jamaican mango flowers are borne in pendent panicles to 5 in (12.5 cm) in length.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The fruit takes three to six months to ripen.^ Germination may take two to three weeks; graftable Jamaican mango seedlings of a quarter inch diameter take about six months.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Jamaican mango fruits of "smudged" Jamaican mango trees ripen several months before those of untreated Jamaican mango trees.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fruits of "smudged" trees ripen several months before those of untreated trees.

.The ripe fruit is variable in size and color.^ There is great variation in the form, size, color and quality of the fruits.

^ When the first fruit shows color on tree, all of that size fruit or larger may be removed; repeat when remaining fruit colors.
  • MANGO Fruit Facts 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.crfg.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Tree is of erect, slender habit, of moderate size, precocious; bears very well and fruit ships well, but, for the market, needs ethylene treatment to enrich color.

.Cultivars are variously yellow, orange, red or green and carry a single flat, oblong pit that can be fibrous or hairy on the surface.^ The leathery Jamaican mango skin is waxy and smooth, and when ripe entirely pale green or yellow marked with red, according to Jamaican mango cultivar.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is round-ovate, large; Jamaican mango skin is fairly thin, olive-green to yellow-green, blushed with red; attractive.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ 'Palmer Jamaican mango' oblong-ovate, plump; large; Jamaican mango skin medium-thick, orange-yellow with red blush and pale bloom and many large lenticels.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Ripe, unpeeled fruit gives off a distinctive resinous, sweet smell.^ When ripe the flesh is pale-orange or yellowish, fibrous and resinous but juicy and sweet, though most types are distinctly turpentine -flavored.
  • Mango 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.hort.purdue.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Inside the pit 1–2 mm (0.039–0.079 in) thick is a thin lining covering a single seed, 4–7 mm (0.16–0.28 in) long, 3–4 cm (1.2–1.6 in) and 1 cm (0.4 in).^ The elliptic fruit, 3 1/4 to 4 in (8-10 cm) long, has yellow skin and fiberless, though rather thin, flesh.

^ The elliptic Jamaican mango fruit, 3 1/4 to 4 in (8-10 cm) long, has yellow Jamaican mango skin and fiber less, though rather thin, flesh.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is oblong, 3 to 5 1/2 in (7.5-16 cm) long, plump, with yellowish- or grayish-green Jamaican mango skin when ripe.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The seed contains the plant embryo.
Photo of halved, inside-out mango with the fruit cut in a grid pattern, still attached to the peel. <a name=.The mango is inside-out, causing the resulting rectangles of fruit to splay out in a pattern similar to the tentacles of a sea urchin."^ Tear streaking is common, resulting from fungal spores that wash down the Jamaican mango fruit from infected twigs or Jamaican mango flower stalks.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The use of lawn sprinkler systems on a timer may result in over watering and cause mango trees to decline.
  • HS2/MG216: Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC edis.ifas.ufl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His resulting grafted Jamaican mango tree, in a protected location in South Florida, Jamaican mango fruited in 1974.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

src="http://images-mediawiki-sites.thefullwiki.org/02/1/0/2/11581102629685912.jpg" width="500" height="130" class="thumbimage" />
The "hedgehog" style is a common way of eating mangoes (left). A cross section of a mango can be seen on the right

Cultivation and uses

Photo of mango trees with clear sky in background
Mango orchard in Multan, Pakistan
White oblong fruits on a background of much thin, but much longer leaves
Unripe mangoes in a mango tree
.Mangoes have been cultivated in the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years[2] and reached East Asia between the 5th-4th century BC. By the 10th century AD, cultivation had begun in East Africa]][2], coming later to Brazil, West Indies and Mexico, where appropriate climate allows its growth.^ Mango originated in Southeast Asia, where it had been cultivated for over four-thousand years.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ Buddhist monks are believed to have taken the Jamaican mango on voyages to Malaya and eastern Asia in the 4th and 5th Centuries B.C. The Persians are said to have carried it to East Africa about the 10th Century A.D. It was commonly grown in the East Indies before the earliest visits of the Portuguese who apparently introduced it to West Africa early in the 16th Century and also into Brazil.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Buddhist monks are believed to have taken the mango on voyages to Malaya and eastern Asia in the 4th and 5th Centuries B.C. The Persians are said to have carried it to East Africa about the 10th Century A.D. It was commonly grown in the East Indies before the earliest visits of the Portuguese who apparently introduced it to West Africa early in the 16th Century and also into Brazil.

[2] The 14th century Moroccan traveler, Ibn Battuta, reported it at Mogadishu.[3]
.Mango is now cultivated in most frost-free tropical and warmer subtropical climates; nearly half of the world's mangoes are cultivated in India alone.^ Distribution: Mangos are grown in tropical and subtropical lowlands throughout the world.
  • HS2/MG216: Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC edis.ifas.ufl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Jamaican mangos basically require a frost-free climate.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Since its discovery, mango groves have spread to many parts of the world, though mostly the tropical and sub-tropical climates.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

[4][5][6]
.Other cultivators include North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, south, west and central Africa, Australia, China, Pakistan and Southeast Asia.^ Other important producers are Australia, South Africa, Israel, and Egypt.
  • HS2/MG216: Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC edis.ifas.ufl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango exists in two races, one from India and the other from the Philippines and Southeast Asia.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Minimum and maximum levels of food constituents derived from various analyses made in Cuba, Central America, Africa and India.

.Many of its 1,000+ cultivars are easily cultivated, ranging from the "turpentine mango" (named for its strong taste of turpentine, which according to the Oxford Companion to Food some varieties actually contain) to the huevos de toro ("eggs of the bull", a euphemism for "bull's testicles", referring to the shape and size).^ It's not too strong with the mango, but plenty enough to taste it."
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ The Jamaican mango tree is valued mainly for its timber which is largely sapwood, light in weight and easily worked but medium-hard and strong.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Over 500 named varieties of Jamaican mangoes (some say 1,000) have evolved and have been described in India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Though India is the largest producer of mangoes, it accounts for less than one percent of the global mango trade, consuming most of its own output.^ Commercial potential: The mango is the apple (or peach) of the tropics, and one of the most commonly eaten fruits in tropical countries around the world.
  • MANGO Fruit Facts 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.crfg.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ We where eating Durian every day and the cost for one Durian was less than half a dollar.

^ Blooming and Pollination Mango trees less than 10 years old may flower and fruit regularly every year.

[7]
Dwarf or semi-dwarf varieties serve as ornamental plants and can be grown in containers.
.A wide variety of diseases can afflict mangoes; see List of mango diseases.^ Varieties of the Indian type typically have monoembryonic (single embryo) Jamaican mango seeds, highly colored Jamaican mango fruit and are subject to anthracnose disease.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Food

.Mango is generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an over-ripe plum, while others flesh is firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado.^ It really tastes like mango, so fresh and a little sweet.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ When ripe the flesh is pale-orange or yellowish, fibrous and resinous but juicy and sweet, though most types are distinctly turpentine -flavored.
  • Mango 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.hort.purdue.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The aroma and flavor are strong but not artificial like some others we've tried."
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

Some cultivars' flesh has a fibrous texture. .Mango is consumed both as ripe fruit and as raw fruit (vegetable)[citation needed].^ In humid climates, anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Glomerella cingulata) affects Jamaican mango flowers, leaves, twigs, Jamaican mango fruits, both young and mature.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Germination rate and vigor of Jamaican mango seedlings are highest when Jamaican mango seeds are taken from Jamaican mango fruits that are fully ripe, not still firm.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is oblong, 3 to 5 1/2 in (7.5-16 cm) long, plump, with yellowish- or grayish-green Jamaican mango skin when ripe.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In raw and pickle forms, the mango skin is consumed comfortably, whereas in fruits, the skin gets thicker and bitter and is usually not eaten.^ The Jamaican mango fruit is round-ovate, large; Jamaican mango skin is fairly thin, olive-green to yellow-green, blushed with red; attractive.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Green Jamaican mangoes are sometimes eaten raw in the tropics.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It, like the sap of the trunk and branches and the Jamaican mango skin of the unripe Jamaican mango fruit, is a potent Jamaican mango skin irritant, and capable of blistering the Jamaican mango skin of the normal individual.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The ripe mango is commonly eaten fresh.^ Commercial potential: The mango is the apple (or peach) of the tropics, and one of the most commonly eaten fruits in tropical countries around the world.
  • MANGO Fruit Facts 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.crfg.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango is the apple (or peach) of the tropics, and one of the most commonly eaten Jamaican mango fruits in tropical countries around the world.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Quality of Jamaican mangoes is highly variable; some types being subacid to sweet and agreeable and these are commonly eaten in Malaya.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Indian and Pakistani Cuisine

Photo of sealed, soft, metal package
.Mangoes are widely used in Indian and Pakistani cuisine.^ The polyembryonic Indian Jamaican mango cultivars, 'Olour' and 'Vellai Colamban', when used as rootstocks, have a dwarfing effect; so has the polyembryonic 'Sabre' in experiments in Israel and South Africa.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Sour, unripe mangoes are used in chutneys, pickles, side dishes like meth-amba in Maharashtra and manga pachadi in Kerala.^ Fresh consumption is the most important use of Jamaican mango, but the Jamaican mango fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Jamaican mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Good for ocassional use" Kathleen K. Jun 10th '02 "wonderful...definitely tastes like mango" Noriko O. Jun 5th '02 "It's a nice smelling tea!
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ It, like the sap of the trunk and branches and the Jamaican mango skin of the unripe Jamaican mango fruit, is a potent Jamaican mango skin irritant, and capable of blistering the Jamaican mango skin of the normal individual.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

They are eaten raw with salt and chili. .Raw mangoes are preserved in brine with dried red chilis, known as Achar in Hindi or "Ooragaaya" in Telugu or "Oorga" in Tamil and "Uppil Ittathu" in Malayalam literally meaning "Put in Salt". A cooling summer drink called panna or panha comes from mangoes.^ Jamaican mangos luxuriate in summer heat and resent cool summer fog.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fresh consumption is the most important use of Jamaican mango, but the Jamaican mango fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Jamaican mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The best climate for Jamaican mango has rainfall of 30 to 100 in (75-250 cm) in the four summer months (June to September) followed by 8 months of dry season.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Ripe mangoes are typically eaten fresh. .Mango smoothie, made by adding mango pulp to a yoghurt drink, is a popular drink called lassi in India and Indian restaurants elsewhere.^ The Jamaican mango or scientifically Mangifera indica is sometimes called Jamaican mangot, manga and Jamaican mango is native to southern Asia, especially Burma and eastern India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mango consumers in England are mostly residents of Indian origin, or English people who formerly lived in India.

^ Jamaican mango consumers in England are mostly residents of Indian origin, or English people who formerly lived in India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Ripe mangoes are also used to make curries like mambazha kaalan in Kerala.^ Green or ripe mangos may be used to make relish.

^ Green or ripe Jamaican mangos may be used to make relish.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Good for ocassional use" Kathleen K. Jun 10th '02 "wonderful...definitely tastes like mango" Noriko O. Jun 5th '02 "It's a nice smelling tea!
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

.Aamras is a popular pulp/thick juice made of mangoes with sugar or milk and is consumed along with bread.^ Cammie O. Feb 12th '05 "This is one of my favorites so far, has such a good mango flavor to it and is even better with milk and sugar!"
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

.Mangoes are used in preserves like moramba, amchur (dried and powdered unripe mango) and pickles (commonly known as achaar).^ Thin slices, seasoned with turmeric, are dried, and sometimes powdered, and used to impart an acid flavor to chutneys, vegetables and soup.
  • Mango 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.hort.purdue.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A long-poled picking bag which holds no more than 4 Jamaican mango fruits is commonly used by pickers.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fresh consumption is the most important use of Jamaican mango, but the Jamaican mango fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Jamaican mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Different varieties of mango pickles are made in many regions of India, such as Avakaya Pachchadi of Andhra Pradesh, Vadu Maangaa pickle and Thokku Manga pickle from Tamil Nadu, miscut (pronounced mis-koot), a spicy mustard-oil pickle from Goa.^ In the warmest regions in Jamaica the mangoes flourish however in the coastal regions the most cold adapted varieties are likely to succeed.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Robert A. Oct 8th '01 "Being of Cuban descent, mango is a fruit of lifestyle for me and my family, which made this tea that much more enjoyable.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ Over 500 named varieties of Jamaican mangoes (some say 1,000) have evolved and have been described in India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Ripe mangoes are often cut into thin layers, desiccated, folded, and then cut.^ Surplus ripe mangos are peeled, sliced and canned in sirup, or made into jam, marmalade, jelly or nectar.

^ Season: July and August and often into September, but if left on too long the Jamaican mango seed tends to sprout in the Jamaican mango fruita condition called ovipary.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But neither cuttings nor air layers develop good root systems and are not practical for establishing Jamaican mango plantations.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.These bars, known as aampapdi,' amavat or halva in Hindi, are similar to dried guava fruit bars available in Colombia.^ Other times, too, I would be on an all raw vegan diet, with a high fruit percentage, but include some carrot or lettuce, dried seaweed or similar ..

The fruit is also added to cereal products like muesli and oat granola.

Other countries

Photo of dozens of green fruits
Native green mangoes from the Philippines
In Australia, the mango is an introduced species.
.In the Philippines, unripe mango is eaten with bagoong.^ Immature Jamaican mango leaves are cooked and eaten in Indonesia and the Philippines.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Immature mango leaves are cooked and eaten in Indonesia and the Philippines.

.Dried strips of sweet, ripe mango (sometimes combined with seedless tamarind to form Mangorind) are also popular, with those from Cebu exported worldwide.^ Green Jamaican mangos are peeled, sliced, parboiled, then combined with sugar, salt, various spices and cooked, sometimes with raisins or other Jamaican mango fruits, to make chutney; or they may be salted, sun-dried and kept for use in chutney and pickles.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Green mangos are peeled, sliced, parboiled, then combined with sugar, salt, various spices and cooked, sometimes with raisins or other fruits, to make chutney; or they may be salted, sun-dried and kept for use in chutney and pickles.

^ Sometimes corn flour and tamarind Jamaican mango seed jellose are mixed in.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Mangoes are used to make juices, mango nectar, and as a flavoring and major ingredient in ice cream and sorbetes.^ Fresh and juice mango flavor.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ The mango flavor is pretty strong but icing it makes it perfect."
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ The flavor is not that strong so, some cut up mango with the iced tea would go nicely, but not needed to enjoy."
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

Guimaras produces a delicious mango.
.In Mexico, mango is used to make juices, smoothies, ice cream, fruit bars, raspados, aguas frescas, pies and sweet chili sauce, or mixed with chamoy, a sweet and spicy chili paste.^ It can also be frozen, dried, canned, or cooked in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • HS2/MG216: Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC edis.ifas.ufl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A long-poled picking bag which holds no more than 4 Jamaican mango fruits is commonly used by pickers.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I also like to mix it with the passionfruit flavor, or make it iced tea!!"
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

It is popular on a stick dipped in hot chili powder and salt or also as a main ingredient in fresh fruit combinations. .In Central America (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica), mango is either eaten green with salt, pepper and hot sauce, or ripe in various forms.^ Green or ripe mangos may be used to make relish.

^ 'Black Cold' mangoes, dark-green externally when ripe, are partly peeled like "radish roses" on the Bangkok market to show their yellow, fiberless flesh.

^ The diced flesh of ripe mangos, bathed in sweetened or unsweetened lime juice, to prevent discoloration, can be quick-frozen, as can sweetened ripe or green mango puree.

.Only in Costa Rica, ripe mangoes are called manga to differentiate them.^ The Jamaican mango or scientifically Mangifera indica is sometimes called Jamaican mangot, manga and Jamaican mango is native to southern Asia, especially Burma and eastern India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In Guatemala, toasted and ground pumpkin seed (called Pepita) with lime and salt are the norm when eating green mangoes.^ Season: July and August and often into September, but if left on too long the Jamaican mango seed tends to sprout in the Jamaican mango fruita condition called ovipary.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The diced flesh of ripe mangos, bathed in sweetened or unsweetened lime juice, to prevent discoloration, can be quick-frozen, as can sweetened ripe or green mango puree.

^ The diced flesh of ripe Jamaican mangos, bathed in sweetened or unsweetened lime juice, to prevent discoloration, can be quick-frozen, as can sweetened ripe or green Jamaican mango puree.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In Colombia mango is also eaten either green with salt and/or lime, or ripe in various forms.^ Green or ripe mangos may be used to make relish.

^ 'Black Cold' mangoes, dark-green externally when ripe, are partly peeled like "radish roses" on the Bangkok market to show their yellow, fiberless flesh.

^ The diced flesh of ripe mangos, bathed in sweetened or unsweetened lime juice, to prevent discoloration, can be quick-frozen, as can sweetened ripe or green mango puree.

.Pieces of mango can be mashed and used as a topping on ice cream or blended with milk and ice as milkshakes.^ Fresh consumption is the most important use of Jamaican mango, but the Jamaican mango fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Jamaican mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Signature Blend Tea Mango Passion Iced Tea blended by Zack Mcdougall .
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

.In Thailand and other South East Asian countries, sweet glutinous rice is flavored with coconut then served with sliced mango as a dessert.^ Flesh orange-yellow, firm, fiber less except near the Jamaican mango seed; of rich, sweet flavor; very good quality of Jamaican mangoes.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Annaliese F. Oct 19th '04 "I love this tea because it is not too sweet but still has a great mango flavor!
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ Egypt produces 110,230 tons (100,000 MT) of mangos annually and exports moderate amounts to 20 countries in the Near East and Europe.

.In other parts of South-east Asia, mangoes are pickled with fish sauce and rice vinegar.^ The Jamaican mango exists in two races, one from India and the other from the Philippines and Southeast Asia.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In Indonesia and Thailand, green mango is sold by street vendors with sugar and salt and/or chili, or used in a sour salad called rujak or rojak in Indonesia and Singapore.^ Green or ripe mangos may be used to make relish.

^ Green or ripe Jamaican mangos may be used to make relish.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Green mangos are peeled, sliced, parboiled, then combined with sugar, salt, various spices and cooked, sometimes with raisins or other fruits, to make chutney; or they may be salted, sun-dried and kept for use in chutney and pickles.

.Green mangoes can be used in mango salad with fish sauce and dried shrimps.^ Fresh consumption is the most important use of Jamaican mango, but the Jamaican mango fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Jamaican mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mango juice may be spray-dried and powdered and used in infant and invalid foods, or reconstituted and drunk as a beverage.

^ Half-ripe or green mangos are peeled and sliced as filling for pie, used for jelly, or made into sauce which, with added milk and egg whites, can be converted into mango sherbet.

In Taiwan, mango is a topping that can be added to shaved ice along with condensed milk.

Nutrients and phytochemicals

Mango, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 272 kJ (65 kcal)
Carbohydrates 17.00 g
Sugars 14.8 g
Dietary fiber 1.8 g
Fat 0.27 g
Protein .51 g
Vitamin A equiv. 38 μg (4%)
- beta-carotene 445 μg (4%)
Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.058 mg (4%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.057 mg (4%)
Niacin (Vit. B3) 0.584 mg (4%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.160 mg (3%)
Vitamin B6 0.134 mg (10%)
Folate (Vit. B9) 14 μg (4%)
Vitamin C 27.7 mg (46%)
Calcium 10 mg (1%)
Iron 0.13 mg (1%)
Magnesium 9 mg (2%)
Phosphorus 11 mg (2%)
Potassium 156 mg (3%)
Zinc 0.04 mg (0%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database
Mango is rich in a variety of phytochemicals[8] and nutrients. The fruit pulp is high in prebiotic dietary fiber, vitamin C, polyphenols and provitamin A carotenoids.[9]
.Mango contains essential vitamins and dietary minerals.^ The irritant is probably the vaporized essential oil of the Jamaican mango flowers which contains the sesquiterpene alcohol, mangiferol, and the ketone, mangiferone.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The antioxidant vitamins A, C and E comprise 25%, 76% and 9% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) in a 165 grams (5.8 oz) serving. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, 11% DRI), vitamin K (9% DRI), other B vitamins and essential nutrients such as potassium, copper and 17 amino acids are at good levels. .Mango peel and pulp contain other phytonutrients, such as the pigment antioxidants - carotenoids and polyphenols - and omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.^ They may not be able to handle, peel, or eat mangos or any food containing mango flesh or juice.

^ Ripe mangos may be frozen whole or peeled, sliced and packed in sugar (1 part sugar to 10 parts mango by weight) and quick-frozen in moisture-proof containers.

^ Ripe Jamaican mangos may be frozen whole or peeled, sliced and packed in sugar (1 part sugar to 10 parts Jamaican mango by weight) and quick-frozen in moisture-proof containers.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Mango peel contains pigments that may have antioxidant properties,[8][10] including carotenoids, such as the provitamin A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene,[11] polyphenols[12][13] such as quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechins, tannins, and the unique mango xanthone, mangiferin,[14] any of which may counteract free radicals in various disease processes as revealed in preliminary research.^ Ripe Jamaican mangos may be frozen whole or peeled, sliced and packed in sugar (1 part sugar to 10 parts Jamaican mango by weight) and quick-frozen in moisture-proof containers.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Non-fibrous mangos may be cut in half to the stone, the two halves twisted in opposite directions to free the stone which is then removed, and the halves served for eating as appetizers or dessert.

^ Blooming and Pollination Mango trees less than 10 years old may flower and fruit regularly every year.

[15][16] Phytochemical and nutrient content appears to vary across mango species.[17] .Up to 25 different carotenoids have been isolated from mango pulp, the densest of which was beta-carotene, which accounts for the yellow-orange pigmentation of most mango species.^ Flesh orange-yellow, firm, fiber less except near the Jamaican mango seed; of rich, sweet flavor; very good quality of Jamaican mangoes.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is only medium in size; flesh is rich orange, fiberless, sweet and 2 to 3 times as high in carotene as either parent.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It is medium-large; the Jamaican mango skin is bright orange-yellow with red-pink blush overlying areas exposed to the sun.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[18] Peel and leaves also have significant polyphenol content, including xanthones, mangiferin and gallic acid.[19]
The mango triterpene, lupeol[20] is an effective inhibitor in laboratory models of prostate and skin cancers.[21][22][23] .An extract of mango branch bark called Vimang, isolated by Cuban scientists, contains numerous polyphenols with antioxidant properties in vitro[24] and on blood parameters of elderly humans.^ Extracts of unripe Jamaican mango fruits and of bark, stems and leaves have shown antibiotic activity.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[25]
.The pigment euxanthin, known as Indian yellow, is often thought to be produced from the urine of cows fed mango leaves; the practice is described as having been outlawed in 1908 due to malnutrition of the cows and possible urushiol poisoning.^ It is interesting to note that all but four of the leading Indian Jamaican mango cultivars are yellow-Jamaican mango skinned.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In India, cows were formerly fed Jamaican mango leaves to obtain from their urine euxanthic acid which is rich yellow and has been used as a dye.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After propagation and due observation it was named 'Gouveia' in 1969 and described as: ovate-oblong, of medium size, with medium-thick, ochre-yellow Jamaican mango skin blushed with blood-red over 2/3 of the surface.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[26] This supposed origin of euxanthin appears to rely on a single, anecdotal source and Indian legal records do not outlaw such a practice.[27]

Potential for contact dermatitis

.Mango peel contains urushiol, the chemical in poison ivy and poison sumac that can cause urushiol-induced contact dermatitis in susceptible people.^ They may not be able to handle, peel, or eat mangos or any food containing mango flesh or juice.

^ Sap and debris can cause severe dermatitis, similar to poison oak.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Ripe mangos may be frozen whole or peeled, sliced and packed in sugar (1 part sugar to 10 parts mango by weight) and quick-frozen in moisture-proof containers.

[28] Cross-reactions between mango contact allergens and urushiol have been observed.[29] .Those with a history of poison ivy or poison oak may be most at risk for such an allergic reaction.^ As with poison ivy, there is typically a delayed reaction.
  • Mango 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.hort.purdue.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[30] Urushiol is also present in mango leaves and vines. .During mango's primary season, it is the most common source of plant dermatitis in Hawaii.^ The earliest record of the Jamaican mango in Hawaii is the introduction of several small Jamaican mango plants from Manila in 1824.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One of the most serious diseases of the mango is powdery mildew (Oidium mangiferae), which is common in most growing areas of India, occurs mostly in March and April in Florida.

^ The earliest record of the mango in Hawaii is the introduction of several small plants from Manila in 1824.

[31]

Cultural Aspects

Photo of painted "sculpture" of mango at the center of a road roundabout
Mango roundabout, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
.The mango is the national fruit of India, Pakistan and the Philippines.^ The Jamaican mango exists in two races, one from India and the other from the Philippines and Southeast Asia.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit flies, Dacus ferrugineus and D. zonatus, attack the Jamaican mango in India; D. tryoni (now Strumeta tryoni) in Queensland, and D. dorsalis in the Philippines; Pardalaspis cosyra in Kenya; and the Jamaican mango fruit fly is the greatest enemy of the Jamaican mango in Central America.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ India, with 2,471,000 acres (1,000,000 ha) of Jamaican mangos (70% of its Jamaican mango fruit-growing area) produces 65% of the world's Jamaican mango crop9,920,700 tons of Jamaican mangoes.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection. Mango blossoms are also used in worship of Goddess Saraswati.
.Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi.^ Good for ocassional use" Kathleen K. Jun 10th '02 "wonderful...definitely tastes like mango" Noriko O. Jun 5th '02 "It's a nice smelling tea!
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ In India, cows were formerly fed Jamaican mango leaves to obtain from their urine euxanthic acid which is rich yellow and has been used as a dye.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I would like to say that i have used in the pass other airlanes but i would like to try mango lines out because everyone is raving about it....

.Mango motifs are widely used in different Indian embroidery styles and are found in Kashmiri shawls, Kanchipuram silk sarees etc.^ The polyembryonic Indian Jamaican mango cultivars, 'Olour' and 'Vellai Colamban', when used as rootstocks, have a dwarfing effect; so has the polyembryonic 'Sabre' in experiments in Israel and South Africa.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Production and consumption

Phot of woman and hundreds of yellow, orange, and green mangoes on stand
Street vendor selling mangoes in Venezuela
.Mangoes account for approximately half of all tropical fruits produced worldwide.^ Some Jamaican mango seedlings produce numerous tiny, parthenocarpic Jamaican mango fruits which fail to develop and abort.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fertilization is also ineffective when night temperatures are below 55 F. Jamaican mangos are monoecious and self-fertile, so a single Jamaican mango tree will produce Jamaican mango fruit without cross pollination.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Few of the Jamaican mango flowers in each inflorescence are perfect, so most do not produce pollen and are incapable of producing Jamaican mango fruit.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates worldwide production at more than 33,000,000 tonnes (32,000,000 LT; 36,000,000 ST) in 2007 (table below). The aggregate production of the top 10 countries is responsible for roughly 80% of production.
.Alphonso, Benishan or Benishaan (Banganpalli in Telugu and Tamil) and Kesar mango varieties are considered among the best mangoes in India's Southern states while Dussehri and Langda varieties are most popular in the Northern states.^ The Jamaican mango or scientifically Mangifera indica is sometimes called Jamaican mangot, manga and Jamaican mango is native to southern Asia, especially Burma and eastern India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the warmest regions in Jamaica the mangoes flourish however in the coastal regions the most cold adapted varieties are likely to succeed.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This Jamaican mango cultivar is considered the most promising for large-scale culture and export.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Generally, ripe mangoes have an orange-yellow or reddish peel and are juicy for eating, while exported fruit are often picked while under-ripe with green peels.^ It tastes juicy and refreshing like eating a fresh cut mango."
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is round-ovate, large; Jamaican mango skin is fairly thin, olive-green to yellow-green, blushed with red; attractive.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Surplus ripe mangos are peeled, sliced and canned in sirup, or made into jam, marmalade, jelly or nectar.

.Although producing ethylene while ripening, unripened exported mangoes do not have the same juiciness or flavor as fresh fruit.^ Fresh and juice mango flavor.
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ It tastes juicy and refreshing like eating a fresh cut mango."
  • Mango Tea 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.adagio.com [Source type: General]

^ Fresh consumption is the most important use of Jamaican mango, but the Jamaican mango fruit can be frozen, dried or canned Jamaican mango can be used in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney and ice cream.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Like other drupaceous fruits, mangoes come in both freestone and clingstone varieties.^ In humid climates, anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Glomerella cingulata) affects Jamaican mango flowers, leaves, twigs, Jamaican mango fruits, both young and mature.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It, like the sap of the trunk and branches and the Jamaican mango skin of the unripe Jamaican mango fruit, is a potent Jamaican mango skin irritant, and capable of blistering the Jamaican mango skin of the normal individual.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Of approximately 40 other species of Mangifera, a few are cultivated for their fruits and several have been employed as rootstocks for the mango in Malaya.

Top producers of mangoes, mangosteens, guavas, 2007
Country Production in Tons
 India
13,501,000
 People's Republic of China
3,752,000
 Mexico
2,050,000
 Thailand
1,800,000
 Pakistan
1,719,180
 Indonesia
1,620,000
 Brazil
1,546,000
 World total
33,445,279
Source
Food And Agricultural Organization of United Nations: Economic And Social Department: The Statistical Division

Cultivars

Photo of 10 large mangoes
.
Alphonso mangoes (local name: Hapoos, also known as the "The King of Mangoes") are grown mainly in Devgad, Sindhudurg and Ratnagiri districts of Maharashtra, India and favored there, are now popular in the United States.
^ These are mainly seedlings, as are those of the other states with major mango crops–Ceará, Paraibá, Goias, Pernambuco, and Maranhao.

^ One of the fibrous Jamaican mango cultivars, named 'Tee-Vee-Dee', is so well flavored and aromatic that it is locally extremely popular.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There is a famous mango, 'Pane Ka Aam' of Maharashtra and Khamgaon, India, with "paper-thin" skin and fiberless flesh.

[32][33]
.Many hundreds of named mango cultivars exist.^ After checking with available published material on other Jamaican mango cultivars for possible resemblances, descriptions and photographs of 21 newly named Jamaican mango cultivars were published in 1973.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Florida-originated selections or Jamaican mango cultivars, of which many have risen and declined over the decades.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Budwood of a Jamaican mango cultivar named 'Wan', meaning "sweet", was obtained by William F. Whitman from an orchard near Bangkok in 1967.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In mango orchards, several cultivars are often crossed to improve pollination.^ In quality of Jamaican mangoes tests 'Gouveia' received top scoring over 'Haden', 'Pairi', and several other Jamaican mango cultivars.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fertilization is also ineffective when night temperatures are below 55 F. Jamaican mangos are monoecious and self-fertile, so a single Jamaican mango tree will produce Jamaican mango fruit without cross pollination.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Budwood of a Jamaican mango cultivar named 'Wan', meaning "sweet", was obtained by William F. Whitman from an orchard near Bangkok in 1967.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Many desired cultivars are mono-embryonic and need to be propagated by grafting or else they will not breed true.^ Monoembryonic types do not come true from Jamaican mango seed, so they must be grafted onto Jamaican mango seedling rootstocks, using almost any available Jamaican mango seeds.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

A common (mono-embryonic) cultivar is Alphonso known in Asia under its original name, Hapoos (हापुस). This originates from the coastal side of Maharashtra especially city named Devgad in Konkan is considered to be premium producer. As it is extremely popular, outside the Indian subcontinent, Alphonso is an important export product. Alphonso is also cultivated in Sindh province of Pakistan is called Sindhari. It is exported to the Middle East
Other popular cultivars are mentioned in the list (link above).
.Cultivars that excel in one climate may fail elsewhere.^ In 1958, 24 were described as among the important commercial types in India as a whole, though in the various climatic zones other cultivars may be prominent locally.

.For example, Indian cultivars such as Julie, a prolific cultivar in Jamaica, require annual fungicide treatment to escape a lethal fungal disease known as Anthracnose in Florida.^ From 'Julie', the well-known Jamaican mango breeder, Lawrence Zill, developed 'Carrie', but 'Julie' has not been Jamaican mango planted in Florida for many years.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Varieties of the Indian type typically have monoembryonic (single embryo) Jamaican mango seeds, highly colored Jamaican mango fruit and are subject to anthracnose disease.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The much-prized 'Haden' was being recognized in the late 1930's and early 1940's as anthracnose-prone, a light and irregular bearer, and was being replaced by more disease-resistant and prolific cultivars.

.Asian mangoes are resistant to Anthracnose.^ Those of the Indochinese type have polyembryonic Jamaican mango seeds (multiple embryos), and Jamaican mango fruit usually lacking in coloration, but they may have some resistance to anthracnose.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The current world market is dominated by the cultivar Tommy Atkins, a seedling of Haden which first fruited in 1940 in southern Florida, USA. It was initially rejected commercially by Florida researchers[34].^ The mango performs very well in sand, gravel, and even oolitic limestone (as in southern Florida and the Bahamas) A polyembryonic seedling, 'No.

^ A pre-harvest dry stem-end rot was first noticed on 'Tommy Atkins' in Mexico in 1973, and it has spread to all Mexican plantings of this cultivar causing losses of 10-80% especially in wet weather.

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is grown commercially on a small scale in Florida.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.For example, 80% of mangoes in UK supermarkets are Tommy Atkins.^ Plate XXVIII: MANGO, Mangifera indica –'Kent', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Irwin' .

Despite its fibrous flesh and fair taste, growers worldwide have embraced the cultivar for its exceptional productivity and disease resistance, shelf-life, transportability and size and appealing color. .Tommy Atkins is predominant in the USA as well, although other cultivars, such Kent, Keitt, the Haitian-grown Madame Francis and the Mexican grown Champagne are widely available.^ After checking with available published material on other Jamaican mango cultivars for possible resemblances, descriptions and photographs of 21 newly named Jamaican mango cultivars were published in 1973.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The present-day leaders for commercial production and shipping are 'Tommy Atkins', 'Keitt', 'Kent', 'Van Dyke' and Jubilee'.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The other 8 were introductions from Florida'Smith', 'Palmer', 'Haden', 'Zill', 'Carrie', 'Irwin', 'Kent', 'Keitt'.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In urban areas of southern Florida, small gardens, or lack thereof, have fueled the desire for dwarf mango trees.^ In 1833 Jamaican mango seedling Jamaican mango plants were shipped from Yucatan to Cape Sable at the southern tip of mainland Florida but these died.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His resulting grafted Jamaican mango tree, in a protected location in South Florida, Jamaican mango fruited in 1974.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In commercial groves in southern Florida, the Jamaican mango trees are set at the intersection of cross trenches mechanically cut through the limestone.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden has promoted "condo mangoes" which produce at a height below 2–2.5 m (6.6–8.2 ft)[citation needed]
.There is an Australian variety of mango known as R2E2, a name based on the original plant's orchard row location.^ From 'Julie', the well-known Jamaican mango breeder, Lawrence Zill, developed 'Carrie', but 'Julie' has not been Jamaican mango planted in Florida for many years.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In southern Florida, mango trees begin to bloom in late November and continue until February or March, inasmuch as there are early, medium, and late varieties.

^ Over 500 named varieties of Jamaican mangoes (some say 1,000) have evolved and have been described in India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This variety produces large (up to 1 kilograms (2 lb))yellow-red fruit that attracts a premium price in the Australian market.^ 'Kent Jamaican mango' ovate, thick; large; Jamaican mango skin greenish-yellow with dark-red blush and gray bloom; many small, yellow lenticels.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is round-ovate, large; Jamaican mango skin is fairly thin, olive-green to yellow-green, blushed with red; attractive.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The fruit is round-ovate, large; skin is fairly thin, olive-green to yellow-green, blushed with red; attractive.

Etymology

.The English word mango comes from the Portuguese manga, which is probably derived from the Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa) (pronounced "manga"),[35] from the Tamil mānkāy, from mān "mango tree" + kāy "fruit".[36] The word's first recorded attestation in a European language was a text by Ludovico di Varthema in Italian in 1510, as Manga; the first recorded occurrences in languages such as French and post-classical Latin appear to be translations from this Italian text.^ During exceptionally warm winters, mango trees have been known to bloom 3 times in succession, each time setting and maturing fruit.

^ The Jamaican mango tree is long-lived, some specimens being known to be 300 years old and still Jamaican mango fruiting.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Blooming and Pollination Mango trees less than 10 years old may flower and fruit regularly every year.

The origin of the -o ending in English is unclear.[35]

See also

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Mango: botany and taxonomy, HorticultureWorld
  2. ^ a b c Ensminger 1994: 1373
  3. ^ Watson, Andrew J. (1983). Agricultural innovation in the early Islamic world: the diffusion of crops and farming techniques, 700–1100. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 72–3. ISBN 0-521-24711-X. 
  4. ^ Jedele S, Hau AM, von Oppen M. An analysis of the world market for mangoes and its importance for developing countries. Conference on International Agricultural Research for Development, 2003[1]
  5. ^ India world's largest producer of mangoes, Rediff India Abroad, April 21, 2004
  6. ^ Mad About mangoes: As exports to the U.S. resume, a juicy business opportunity ripens, India Knowledge@Wharton Network, June 14, 2007
  7. ^ USAID helps Indian mango farmers access new markets, USAID-India, May 3, 2006
  8. ^ a b Ajila CM, Prasada Rao UJ (2008). "Protection against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage in rat erythrocytes by Mangifera indica L. peel extract". Food Chem Toxicol 46 (1): 303–9. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2007.08.024. PMID 17919803. 
  9. ^ Nutrient profile for mango, Nutritiondata.com
  10. ^ Berardini N, Fezer R, Conrad J, Beifuss U, Carle R, Schieber A (2005). "Screening of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars for their contents of flavonol O- and xanthone C-glycosides, anthocyanins, and pectin". J Agric Food Chem 53 (5): 1563–70. doi:10.1021/jf0484069. PMID 15740041. 
  11. ^ Gouado I, Schweigert FJ, Ejoh RA, Tchouanguep MF, Camp JV (2007). "Systemic levels of carotenoids from mangoes and papaya consumed in three forms (juice, fresh and dry slice)". Eur J Clin Nutr 61 (10): 1180–8. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602841. PMID 17637601. 
  12. ^ Mahattanatawee K, Manthey JA, Luzio G, Talcott ST, Goodner K, Baldwin EA (2006). "Total antioxidant activity and fiber content of select Florida-grown tropical fruits". J Agric Food Chem 54 (19): 7355–63. doi:10.1021/jf060566s. PMID 16968105. 
  13. ^ Singh UP, Singh DP, Singh M, et al. (2004). "Characterization of phenolic compounds in some Indian mango cultivars". Int J Food Sci Nutr 55 (2): 163–9. doi:10.1080/09637480410001666441. PMID 14985189. 
  14. ^ Andreu GL, Delgado R, Velho JA, Curti C, Vercesi AE (2005). "Mangiferin, a natural occurring glucosyl xanthone, increases susceptibility of rat liver mitochondria to calcium-induced permeability transition". Arch Biochem Biophys 439 (2): 184–93. doi:10.1016/j.abb.2005.05.015. PMID 15979560. 
  15. ^ Percival SS, Talcott ST, Chin ST, Mallak AC, Lounds-Singleton A, Pettit-Moore J (2006). "Neoplastic transformation of BALB/3T3 cells and cell cycle of HL-60 cells are inhibited by mango (Mangifera indica L.) juice and mango juice extracts". J Nutr 136 (5): 1300–4. PMID 16614420. http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16614420. 
  16. ^ Rodríguez J, Di Pierro D, Gioia M, et al. (2006). "Effects of a natural extract from Mangifera indica L, and its active compound, mangiferin, on energy state and lipid peroxidation of red blood cells". Biochim Biophys Acta 1760 (9): 1333–42. doi:10.1016/j.bbagen.2006.04.005. PMID 16860486. 
  17. ^ Rocha Ribeiro SM, Queiroz JH, Lopes Ribeiro de Queiroz ME, Campos FM, Pinheiro Sant'ana HM (2007). "Antioxidant in mango (Mangifera indica L.) pulp". Plant Foods Hum Nutr 62 (1): 13–7. doi:10.1007/s11130-006-0035-3. PMID 17243011. 
  18. ^ Chen JP, Tai CY, Chen BH (2004). "Improved liquid chromatographic method for determination of carotenoids in Taiwanese mango (Mangifera indica L.)". J Chromatogr A 1054 (1–2): 261–8. PMID 15553152. 
  19. ^ Barreto JC, Trevisan MT, Hull WE, et al. (2008). "Characterization and quantitation of polyphenolic compounds in bark, kernel, leaves, and peel of mango (Mangifera indica L.)". J Agric Food Chem 56 (14): 5599–610. doi:10.1021/jf800738r. PMID 18558692. 
  20. ^ Chaturvedi PK, Bhui K, Shukla Y (2008). "Lupeol: connotations for chemoprevention". Cancer Lett 263 (1): 1–13. doi:10.1016/j.canlet.2008.01.047. PMID 18359153. 
  21. ^ Prasad S, Kalra N, Singh M, Shukla Y (2008). "Protective effects of lupeol and mango extract against androgen induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice" (PDF). Asian J Androl 10 (2): 313–8. doi:10.1111/j.1745-7262.2008.00313.x. PMID 18097535. http://www.nature.com/aja/journal/v10/n2/pdf/aja2008241a.pdf. 
  22. ^ Nigam N, Prasad S, Shukla Y (2007). "Preventive effects of lupeol on DMBA induced DNA alkylation damage in mouse skin". Food Chem Toxicol 45 (11): 2331–5. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2007.06.002. PMID 17637493. 
  23. ^ Saleem M, Afaq F, Adhami VM, Mukhtar H (2004). "Lupeol modulates NF-kappaB and PI3K/Akt pathways and inhibits skin cancer in CD-1 mice". Oncogene 23 (30): 5203–14. doi:10.1038/sj.onc.1207641. PMID 15122342. 
  24. ^ Rodeiro I, Cancino L, González JE, et al. (2006). "Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang), a new natural product with antioxidant activity". Food Chem Toxicol 44 (10): 1707–13. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2006.05.009. PMID 16857303. 
  25. ^ Pardo-Andreu GL, Philip SJ, Riaño A, et al. (2006). "Mangifera indica L. (Vimang) protection against serum oxidative stress in elderly humans". Arch Med Res 37 (1): 158–64. doi:10.1016/j.arcmed.2005.04.017. PMID 16314203. 
  26. ^ History of Indian yellow, Pigments Through the Ages
  27. ^ Finlay, Victoria (2003). Color : A Natural History of the Palette. New York: Random House Trade Paperbacks. ISBN 0-8129-7142-6. 
  28. ^ Rocha Ribeiro SM, Queiroz JH, Lopes Ribeiro de Queiroz ME, Campos FM, Pinheiro Sant'ana HM (2007). "Antioxidant in mango (Mangifera indica L.) pulp". Plant Foods Hum Nutr 62 (1): 13–7. doi:10.1007/s11130-006-0035-3. PMID 17243011. "However, the mango peel has properties similar to sumac or poison ivy, resulting in allergic rashes around the mouth, eyes, cheeks, and genitalia if the urushiol oil is spread. Washing the affected area five minutes after contact should prevent some of the symptoms. Symptoms can be swelling, formation of yellow sores, redness, and if unmaintained, may be subjected to bacterial infection.". 
  29. ^ Oka K, Saito F, Yasuhara T, Sugimoto A. (2004). "A study of cross-reactions between mango contact allergens and urushiol". Contact Dermatitis 51 (5–6): 292–6. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2004.00451.x. PMID 15606656. 
  30. ^ Hershko K, Weinberg I, Ingber A (2005). "Exploring the mango – poison ivy connection: the riddle of discriminative plant dermatitis". Contact Dermatitis 52 (1): 3–5. doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2005.00454.x. 
  31. ^ McGovern TW, LaWarre S (2001). "Botanical briefs: the mango tree—Mangifera indica L.". Cutis 67 (5): 365–6. 
  32. ^ Allen J. Mango mania in Portland, Oregon, New York Times, May 10, 2006
  33. ^ Black R. Plump it up. Sweet, juicy mangoes are at their peak, with seasonal varieties ripe for the picking, New York Daily News, May 13, 2007
  34. ^ Susser, Allen (2001). The Great Mango Book. New York: Ten Speed Press. ISBN 1580082041. 
  35. ^ a b Oxford English Dictionary, mango, n.1 (and adj.). Retrieved 2009-06-22.
  36. ^ American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed., mango. Retrieved 2009-12-19.

Further reading

  • Ensminger, Audrey H.; Ensminger, Marion E. (1994). Foods and Nutrition Encyclopedia. CRC Press. pp. 1373. ISBN 0849389801. 
  • Ensminger, Audrey H.; et al. (1995). The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods & Nutrition. CRC Press. pp. 651. ISBN 0849344557. 

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.MANGO. The mango-tree (Mangifera indica, natural order Anacardiaceae) is a native of tropical Asia, but is now extensively cultivated in the tropical and subtropical regions of the New as well as the Old World.^ Mangifera indica Family: Anacardiaceae Mango Origin: South Asia and India Oldest cultivated fruit tree in the world.
  • www.TopTropicals.com - rare plants for home and garden 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC toptropicals.com [Source type: General]

^ Mangifera indica - Mallika 'Mallika' is a condo mango native to India.
  • www.TopTropicals.com - rare plants for home and garden 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC toptropicals.com [Source type: General]

^ Distribution: Mangos are grown in tropical and subtropical lowlands throughout the world.
  • HS2/MG216: Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC edis.ifas.ufl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is indigenous in India at the base of the Himalayas, and in Further India and the Andaman Islands (see A. de Candolle, Origin of Cultivated Plants) . The cultivation of the fruit must have spread at an early age over the Indian Peninsula, and it now grows everywhere in the plains.^ Origin and Distribution Native to southern Asia, especially eastern India, Burma, and the Andaman Islands, the mango has been cultivated, praised and even revered in its homeland since Ancient times.

^ Some sources state that the Jamaican mango is na tive to the Andaman Islands, the Jamaican mango has been cultivated, praised and even revered in its homeland since Ancient times.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ M. sylvatica Roxb., is a large tree to 150 ft (45 m) growing wild in the eastern Himalayas, Nepal and the Andaman Islands, from 980 to 4,200 ft (300-1,300 m).

.It grows rapidly to a height of 30 to 40 ft., and its dense, spreading and glossy foliage would secure its cultivation for the sake of its shade and beauty alone.^ A medium to large (30 to 100 ft; 9.1 to 30.5 m), evergreen tree, with a symmetrical, rounded canopy ranging from low and dense to upright and open.
  • HS2/MG216: Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC edis.ifas.ufl.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It can be maintained at a height and spread of 8 to 10 ft with a minimal of care and pruning.
  • www.TopTropicals.com - rare plants for home and garden 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC toptropicals.com [Source type: General]

.Its fruit, a drupe, though in the wild variety (not to be confused with that of Spondias mangifera, belonging to the same order, also called wild mango in India) stringy and sour, from its containing much gallic acid, and with a disagreeable flavour of turpentine, has become sweet and luscious through culture and selection, to which we owe many varieties, differing not only in flavour but also in size, from that of a plum to that of an apple.^ The Jamaican mango or scientifically Mangifera indica is sometimes called Jamaican mangot, manga and Jamaican mango is native to southern Asia, especially Burma and eastern India.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Jamaican mango fruit is only medium in size; flesh is rich orange, fiberless, sweet and 2 to 3 times as high in carotene as either parent.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It is essentially peach-like but much more fibrous (in some Jamaican mango seedlings excessively so-actually "stringy"); is extremely juicy, with a flavor range from very sweet to sub acid to tart.
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.When unripe, they are used to make pickles, tarts and preserves; ripe, they form a wholesome and very agreeable dessert.^ This pickle makes use of raw mangoes.

^ Green or ripe mangos may be used to make relish.

^ Good variety for eating while green and to use for making Indian green mango pickle (achar).
  • www.TopTropicals.com - rare plants for home and garden 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC toptropicals.com [Source type: General]

.In times of scarcity the kernels also are eaten.^ In times of food scarcity in India, the kernels are roasted or boiled and eaten.
  • Mango 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC www.hort.purdue.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The timber, although soft and liable to decay, serves for common purposes, and, mixed with sandal-wood, is employed in cremation by the Hindus. .It is usually propagated by grafts, or by layering or inarching, rather than by seed.^ Within the stone is the starchy seed, monoembryonic (usually single-sprouting) or polyembryonic (usually producing more than one seedling).

^ Within the stone is the starchy Jamaican mango seed, monoembryonic (usually single-sprouting) or polyembryonic (usually producing more than one Jamaican mango seedling).
  • Jamaican Mango — Jamaica & Jamaican Food 6 January 2010 10:29 UTC getjamaica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

See G. Watt, Dictionary of the Economic_ Products of India (1891).


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also mango

Contents

English

Noun

Singular
Mango
Plural
Mangoes
Mango (plural Mangoes)
  1. Any of various species of hummingbird of the genus Anthracothorax, such as the Jamaican Mango.

See also

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of agmno
  • among

German

Wikipedia-logo.png
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Mango
Wikipedia de

Noun

Mango f. (genitive Mango, plural Mangos)
  1. mango

Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 28, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Mango, which are similar to those in the above article.








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