The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Mangyan

Mangyan: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mangyan indigenous people of Mindoro.

Flag of the Philippines.svg

Demographics of the Philippines
Education
Religions
Languages
Peoples

  Filipino
        Ivatan
        Ilocano
        Igorot
        Ibanag
        Pangasinan
        Kapampangan
        Aeta
        Sambal
        Tagalog
        Bicolano
        Mangyan
        Palawan tribes
        Visayan
        Ati
        Chavacano
        Lumad
        Moro
        Bajau
        Mestizo
          Chinese
          Spanish

  Africans
  Americans
  Arabs
  Europeans
  Indonesians
  Japanese
  Jews
  Koreans
  South Asians
  Spaniards

Mangyan is the generic name for the eight indigenous groups found in Mindoro island, each with its own tribal name, language, and customs. The total population may be around 100,000, but no official statistics are available because of the difficulties of counting remote and reclusive tribal groups, many of which have no contact with the outside world.

The ethnic groups from north to south of the island are: Iraya, Alangan, Tadyawan, Tawbuid (called Batangan by lowlanders on the west of the island), Buhid, Hanunoo. An additional group on the south coast is labelled Ratagnon. They appear to be intermarried with lowlanders. The group known on the east of Mindoro as Bangon may be a subgroup of Tawbuid, as they speak the 'western' dialect of that language.

Mangyan are mainly subsistence agriculturalists, planting a variety of sweet potato, upland (dry cultivation) rice, and taro. They also trap small animals and wild pig. Many who live in close contact with lowland Filipinos sell cash crops such as bananas and ginger.

Their languages are mutually unintelligible, though they share some vocabulary. Tawbuid and Buhid are closely related, and are unusual among Philippine languages in using the /f/ phoneme. Tawbuid is divided into eastern and western dialects. Western Tawbuid may be the only Philippine language to have no glottal phonemes, having neither /h/ or /ʔ/.

Their traditional religious world view is animistic. Around 10% have embraced Christianity, both Roman Catholicism and Evangelical Protestantism. New Testaments have been published in six of the languages.

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message