The Full Wiki

Marcha Real: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

La marcha real
English: The Royal March
Escudo de España (mazonado).svg
The Coat of arms of Spain.
National anthem of  Spain
Lyrics None
Music Unknown
Adopted 1770
Music sample
Himno Nacional de España — Orquesta sinfónica

La marcha real ("The Royal March") is the national anthem of Spain. It is one of the few national anthems in the world to have no official lyrics.

The origins of the anthem, one of the oldest in the world, are unknown. The melody was first printed in a document dated 1761 and entitled Libro de Ordenanza de los toques militares de la Infantería Española (The Spanish Infantry's Book of Military Bugle Calls), by Manuel de Espinosa. Here it is entitled La Marcha Granadera ("March of the Grenadiers"), though no composer's name is given.

In 1770, King Carlos III declared the Marcha Granadera to be the official "Honour March", thereby according it a place at public and ceremonial events. Because it was always played at public events attended by the royal family, Spaniards soon came to regard the Marcha Granadera as their national anthem and called it the Marcha Real, or "Royal March".

Under the Second Spanish Republic (1931–1939), El Himno de Riego replaced La Marcha Real as the national anthem of Spain. At the conclusion of the Civil War, however, dictator Francisco Franco restored La Marcha Real as the country's national anthem, under its old title of La Marcha Granadera.

Contents

Current version

Official anthem release album cover.

The current official version, as described in Royal Decree 1560/1997[1], is a sixteen-bar long phrase, divided in two sections, each one is made up of four repeated bars (AABB form). Tempo is set to ♩= 76 and key to B flat.

Depending on whom the anthem is performed to, there is a short version without the repetitions. The long one is kept for the King, while the short must be performed to Prime Minister, the Prince, or in sport.

Also, there are three official performances by a symphonic orchestra, a military band, and an organ, written by Francisco Grau Vegara and requested by the Government of Spain. All in all, they are six different official adaptations. They all were recorded by the Spanish National Orchestra and the Royal Band as an official recording and released in compact disc during a limited period of time[2].

Copyright issues

Problems listening to this file? See media help.

As the harmonization of Marcha Real was written by Bartolomé Pérez Casas in early 1900s, and the copyright rights haven't yet expired, the Government bought them from Pérez Casas' inheritors in 1997 with 130,000,000 pesetas (~ 781,316) to avoid future legal affairs.[3] Until they expire, the copyright belongs to the Spanish Ministry of Culture, and collecting societies charge copyright fees, which has led to criticism.[4]

As a result, many different harmonizations are performed to avoid paying. Nonetheless, the 1997 Francisco Grau's revision rights were transferred for free to the Government, although they were not placed in the public domain.[5]

Lyrics

Though the Marcha Real has no lyrics, words have been written and used for it in the past. One version was used during Alfonso XIII's reign and another during General Franco's dictatorship; however, none of them was ever made official. The national anthem has been played without words since 1978, when the lyrics that had been approved by right-wing dictator Francisco Franco were abandoned.[6]

Alfonso XIII lyrics

Problems listening to this file? See media help.

Lyrics by Eduardo Marquina (1879-1946)

Gloria, gloria, corona de la Patria,
soberana luz
que es oro en tu color.
Vida, vida, futuro de la Patria,
que en tus ojos es
abierto corazón.
Púrpura y oro: bandera inmortal;
en tus colores, juntas, carne y alma están.
Púrpura y oro: querer y lograr;
Tú eres, bandera, el signo del humano afán.
Gloria, gloria, corona de la Patria,
soberana luz
que es oro en tu color.
Púrpura y oro: bandera inmortal;
en tus colores, juntas, carne y alma están.

English language version

Glory, glory, crown of the Fatherland
sovereign light
which in your standard is gold.

Life, life, future of the Fatherland,
in your eyes it is
an open heart

Purple and gold: immortal flag;
in your colors, together, flesh and soul are.

Purple and gold: to want and to achieve;
You are, flag, the sign of human effort.

Glory, glory, crown of the Fatherland
sovereign light
which in your standard is gold.

Purple and gold: immortal flag;
in your colors, together, flesh and soul are.

Franco lyrics

Lyrics by José María Pemán (1897-1981) at the request of Miguel Primo de Rivera

Viva España, alzad los brazos, hijos
del pueblo español,
que vuelve a resurgir.

Gloria a la Patria que supo seguir,
sobre el azul del mar el caminar del sol.

Gloria a la Patria que supo seguir,
sobre el azul del mar el caminar del sol.

¡Triunfa España! Los yunques y las ruedas
cantan al compás
del himno de la fe.

¡Triunfa España! Los yunques y las ruedas
cantan al compás
del himno de la fe.

Juntos con ellos cantemos de pie
la vida nueva y fuerte del trabajo y paz.

Juntos con ellos cantemos de pie
la vida nueva y fuerte del trabajo y paz.

Viva España, alzad los brazos, hijos
del pueblo español,
que vuelve a resurgir.

Viva España, alzad los brazos, hijos
del pueblo español,
que vuelve a resurgir.

Gloria a la Patria que supo seguir,
sobre el azul del mar el caminar del sol.

Gloria a la Patria que supo seguir,
sobre el azul del mar el caminar del sol.

English language version


Long live Spain, raise your arms, sons
of the Spanish people,
who are rising again.

Glory to the Fatherland that knew how to follow,
over the blue of the sea the path of the sun.

Glory to the Fatherland that knew how to follow,
over the blue of the sea the path of the sun.

Spain triumphs! The anvils and wheels
sing to the rhythm
of the hymn of the faith.

Spain triumphs! The anvils and wheels
sing to the rhythm
of the hymn of the faith.

Together with them let's stand and sing
the new powerful life of labour and peace.

Together with them let's stand and sing
the new powerful life of labour and peace.

Long live Spain, raise your arms, sons
of the Spanish people,
who are arising again.

Long Live Spain, raise your arms, sons
of the Spanish people,
who are arising again.

Glory to the Fatherland that knew how to follow,
over the blue of the sea the path of the sun.

Glory to the Fatherland that knew how to follow,
over the blue of the sea the path of the sun.

Lyric competition

After witnessing a rendition of "You'll Never Walk Alone" at Anfield in 2007, the President of the Spanish Olympic Committee, Alejandro Blanco, said he felt inspired to seek lyrics to La Marcha Real ahead of Madrid's bid to host the 2016 Olympic Games.[7][8] Politicians, including the PM Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, steered clear of the issue in order not to alienate some Basques, Catalans, or Galicians who tend to identify with their own regions rather than with the Spanish state.[9] A number of the autonomous communities of Spain have their own anthems. After widespread public criticism of the proposed lyrics - due to its supposed nationalist tone, the Spanish Olympic Committee withdrew them in January 2008, after just five days.[10]

2008 proposal:



¡Viva España!
Cantemos todos juntos
con distinta voz
y un solo corazón

¡Viva España!
desde los verdes valles
al inmenso mar,
un himno de hermandad

Ama a la patria
pues sabe abrazar,
bajo su cielo azul,
pueblos en libertad

Gloria a los hijos
que a la Historia dan
justicia y grandeza
democracia y paz.

English language version

Long live Spain!
Let's all sing together,
with different voices,
and only one heart.

Long live Spain!
From the green valleys,
to the immense sea,
a hymn of brotherhood.

Love the Fatherland,
which knows how to embrace,
below the blue sky,
peoples in freedom.

Glory to the sons,
who to history give,
justice and greatness,
democracy and peace.

References

  1. ^ Boletín Oficial del Estado Royal Decree 1560/1997.
  2. ^ Official anthem release album cover.
  3. ^ Boletín Oficial del Estado Royal Decretee 1543/1997.
  4. ^ "El himno da aún mucho dinero". Crónica. #604. May 27, 2007.
    "Cuando el himno es de un particular". Periodista Digital. May 27, 2007.
  5. ^ Boletín Oficial del Estado Royal Decretee 2027/1998.
  6. ^ Divisive national anthem lyrics ditched Wed Jan 16, 2008
  7. ^ Liverpool fans help inspire Spain to write words to anthem Reuters, 5 June 2007
  8. ^ Spain to add lyrics to wordless national anthem MSNBC, 26 June 2007
  9. ^ "Lost for Words", The Economist, Vol 384 Number 8539.
  10. ^ "Controversy over lyrics stalls Placido Domingo's dream of singing Spanish anthem". International Herald Tribune. 16 January 2008. http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/01/16/europe/EU-GEN-Spain-Anthem-Controversy-Domingo.php.   Retrieved on 17 January 2008.

Sheet music

External links


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Spanish

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Proper noun

Marcha Real

  1. The national anthem of Spain

Simple English

La Marcha Real (English translation: The Royal March) is the national anthem (country's song) of Spain. It is one of the few national anthems in the world (our planet Earth) to have only music, and no words.









Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message