Mark Driscoll: Wikis

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Mark A. Driscoll
Occupation Pastor, Author, Church planter

Mark A. Driscoll (born October 11, 1970) is an American pastor and author. The co-founder and preaching pastor of Mars Hill Church in Seattle, Washington, he co-founded the Acts 29 Network, and has contributed to the "Faith and Values" section of the Seattle Times. He helped start The Resurgence, a repository of missional theology resources.[1]

Contents

Early life

Driscoll was born in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and was raised Roman Catholic in a rough neighborhood on the outskirts of Seattle. He is a 1989 graduate of Highline High School in Burien, Washington, where he served as student body president and editor of the school newspaper. He earned a Bachelor's degree in communications from Washington State University with a minor in philosophy and holds a Master of Arts degree in exegetical theology at Western Seminary, a school affiliated with the Conservative Baptist Association.[citation needed]

Theological views

Driscoll has not published a comprehensive outline of his theological beliefs (such as a systematic theology), but his sermons, lectures, and books provide a good understanding of what he believes. He has described himself as "first Christian, second Evangelical, third Missional, and fourth Reformed."[2]

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Gender Roles

Driscoll holds to a complementarian view of gender roles. This view believes the Bible to teach that a husband is called to lovingly lead, protect and provide for his wife and family, and that the wife should joyfully and intelligently affirm and submit to her husband's leadership. Complementarians also believe the Bible to teach that men are to bear primary responsibility to lead the church and that therefore only men should be elders.[3]

He sometimes asks his wife to come up on stage to help him answer questions texted in from the audience[4], and believes that this does not class as the preaching/teaching by women prohibited by Paul in 1 Timothy 2:12.[5]

Driscoll has, in his efforts to be relevant, often used coarse language and images to describe his low esteem for women beyond the roles his theological understandings will allow. For example, Mark Driscoll in his own words,

"Without blushing, Paul is simply stating that when it comes to leading in the church, women are unfit because they are more gullible and easier to deceive than men. While many irate women have disagreed with his assessment through the years, it does appear from this that such women who fail to trust his instruction and follow his teaching are much like their mother Eve and are well-intended but ill-informed. . . Before you get all emotional like a woman in hearing this, please consider the content of the women’s magazines at your local grocery store that encourages liberated women in our day to watch porno with their boyfriends, master oral sex for men who have no intention of marrying them, pay for their own dates in the name of equality, spend an average of three-fourths of their childbearing years having sex but trying not to get pregnant, and abort 1/3 of all babies – and ask yourself if it doesn’t look like the Serpent is still trolling the garden and that the daughters of Eve aren’t gullible in pronouncing progress, liberation, and equality (p. 43).[6]

Amyraldism

Driscoll is a Four-Point Calvinist, or Amryaldist who distinguishes between double and single predestination, and says that unlike John Calvin, he believes only in single predestination.[7]

Driscoll denies the orthodox Calvinist view of Limited Atonement, saying that Jesus died for all people in some sense, and for some people (the elect) in another sense.[8] He thinks this position was what John Calvin believed, saying in a humorous tone: 'Calvinism came after Calvin... I will argue that the Calvinists are not very Calvin. I will argue against Calvinism with Calvin... What kind of Calvinist are you? I'm a Calvin, not a Calvinist, that came later'.[8] Driscoll also believes that this position (or slight variations thereof) was held by men like Charles Spurgeon, John Bunyan, Martin Luther, and Richard Baxter.[8]

Spiritual Gifts

Driscoll is a continuationist and thus holds that miraculous gifts such as prophecy and healing are for today. However, he calls himself 'a charismatic with a seatbelt' - distinguishing himself from some of the more extreme elements in the charismatic community.[9] In childhood, Driscoll and his family were Catholic, and his family's spiritual progression led them through the Catholic Charismatic Renewal movement. This was his family's first introduction to the Charismatic movement, and though they eventually left Catholicism, they retained the Charismatic affiliation.[10] At a pastor's conference in August 2005, Driscoll characterized himself as a "Charismatic Calvinist".[11] This is sometimes described as a reformed charismatic.

Quotes

There is a strong drift toward the hard theological left. Some emergent types [want] to recast Jesus as a limp-wrist hippie in a dress with a lot of product in His hair, who drank decaf and made pithy Zen statements about life while shopping for the perfect pair of shoes. In Revelation, Jesus is a prize fighter with a tattoo down His leg, a sword in His hand and the commitment to make someone bleed. That is a guy I can worship. I cannot worship the hippie, diaper, halo Christ because I cannot worship a guy I can beat up. I fear some are becoming more cultural than Christian, and without a big Jesus who has authority and hates sin as revealed in the Bible, we will have less and less Christians, and more and more confused, spiritually self-righteous blogger critics of Christianity.

—Mark Driscoll, Relevant Magazine[12]

“You have been told that God is a loving, gracious, merciful, kind, compassionate, wonderful, and good sky fairy who runs a day care in the sky and has a bucket of suckers for everyone because we’re all good people. That is a lie… God looks down and says ‘I hate you, you are my enemy, and I will crush you,’ and we say that is deserved, right and just, and then God says ‘Because of Jesus I will love you and forgive you.’ This is a miracle.”

Emergent Church Movement

Driscoll, in sermons, has claimed to be "Emerging" or "Emerging Reformed" but not "Emergent."[13][14]

His description of his association with, and eventual distancing from the Emergent Church movement:[15]

In the mid-1990s I was part of what is now known as the Emerging Church and spent some time traveling the country to speak on the emerging church in the emerging culture on a team put together by Leadership Network called the Young Leader Network. But, I eventually had to distance myself from the Emergent stream of the network because friends like Brian McLaren and Doug Pagitt began pushing a theological agenda that greatly troubled me. Examples include referring to God as a chick, questioning God's sovereignty over and knowledge of the future, denial of the substitutionary atonement at the cross, a low view of Scripture, and denial of hell which is one hell of a mistake.

Driscoll and the Acts 29 network of independent churches, is part of the missional theology community that adheres to classical Calvinist, or Reformed, theology and views their mission as communicating this school of theology to "modern" people (Emerging Reformed).

The Resurgence

Driscoll founded The Resurgence, a theological cooperative which includes Mike Anderson (Director) and Tim Smith. Its partners include Acts 29 Network and Mars Hill Church and it is also associated with Desiring God (a ministry of John Piper), The Gospel Coalition (including Tim Keller and DA Carson), Crossway Books and The Hub.

The Resurgence aims to train church leaders in practical theology. It has three main branches: Re:Lit, a publishing house; Re:Train, a missional training centre; and Re:Sound, a music arm.

ABC Nightline Special

In 2009, Driscoll was involved in a debate with Deepak Chopra in an ABC special entitled, "Does Satan Exist?". He has also been featured on the program discussing other topics including the 10 Commandments.

Haiti Relief

In January 2010, following the 7.0-measured earthquake disaster, Driscoll and James MacDonald took a crew to Haiti to provide prayer and relief to Haitian churches through their ministry ChurchesHelpingChurches.com.

See also

References

  1. ^ "About the Resurgence". http://theresurgence.com/about. Retrieved 2008-02-12. 
  2. ^ Acts 29 Network: Doctrine
  3. ^ Driscoll, Mark: It's Always Something at Mars Hill Church, Mark Driscoll's blog, September 19, 2006. Retrieved November 15, 2006.
  4. ^ see http://www.marshillchurch.org/media/trial and go to the sermon 'Marriage and Women' 45:38min through he invites her up.
  5. ^ see http://www.marshillchurch.org/media/trial and go to the sermon 'Marriage and Women' 1:01:25min through he clarifies this.
  6. ^ Mark Driscoll, Church Leadership: Explaining the Roles of Jesus, Elders, Deacons, and Members at Mars Hill, Mars Hill Theology Series (Seattle, WA: Mars Hill Church, 2004).
  7. ^ http://www.marshillchurch.org/media/religionsaves go to the Part 3 sermon 'Predestination', after about 8:30min through the sermon he talks briefly about this.
  8. ^ a b c Unlimited-Limited Atonement (audio) see especially between 44 and 50 mins
  9. ^ http://adrianwarnock.com/2006/10/audio-sermons-mark-driscoll-the-charismatic-with-a-seat-belt/
  10. ^ http://adrianwarnock.com/2008/07/toam08-mark-driscoll-doctrine-of-holy.htm
  11. ^ audio, quote starts at 53 minutes in.
  12. ^ The Panel. "7 Big Questions". Relevant Magazine issue 24 (Relevant Media Group). http://www.relevantmagazine.com/god_article.php?id=7418. Retrieved 2008-05-06. 
  13. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcbnGXSYxuI
  14. ^ http://modernmarch.com/2009/06/30/mark-driscoll-contending/
  15. ^ Driscoll, Mark (2006). "TheResurgence". http://theresurgence.com/?q=node/5. Retrieved 2008-01-06. 

Bibliography

  • Driscoll, Mark (2009). Religion Saves: And Nine Other Misconceptions. Crossway Books. ISBN 1433506165. 
  • Driscoll, Mark; Gerry Breshears (2009). Vintage Church: Timeless Truths and Timely Methods. Crossway Books. ISBN 1433501302. 
  • Driscoll, Mark; Gerry Breshears (2008). Death by Love: Letters from the Cross. Crossway Books. ISBN 1433501295. 
  • Driscoll, Mark (2008). On the New Testament (Book You'll Actually Read). Crossway Books. ISBN 1433501341. 
  • Driscoll, Mark (2008). On the Old Testament (Book You'll Actually Read). Crossway Books. ISBN 143350135X. 
  • Driscoll, Mark (2008). On Church Leadership (Book You'll Actually Read). Crossway Books. ISBN 1433501376. 
  • Driscoll, Mark (2008). On Who Is God? (Book You'll Actually Read). Crossway Books. ISBN 1433501368. 
  • Driscoll, Mark; Gerry Breshears (2008). Vintage Jesus: Timeless Answers to Timely Questions. Crossway Books. ISBN 1581349750. 
  • Driscoll, Mark; et al. (2007). John Piper. ed. The Supremacy of Christ in a Postmodern World. Crossway Books. ISBN 158134922X. 
  • Driscoll, Mark; et al. (2007). Robert E. Webber. ed. Listening to the Beliefs of Emerging Churches. Zondervan. ISBN 0310271355. 
  • Driscoll, Mark (2006). Confessions of a Reformission Rev.. Zondervan. ISBN 0310270162. 
  • Driscoll, Mark (2004). The Radical Reformission. Zondervan. ISBN 0310256593. 
  • Howerton, Mike (2004). The Relevant Church: A New Vision For Communities Of Faith. Relevant Books. ISBN 097469424X. 

eBooks

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Mark A. Driscoll (born 11 October 1970) is an American pastor and author. The co-founder and preaching pastor of Mars Hill Church in Seattle, Washington, he co-founded the Acts 29 Network, and has contributed to the "Faith and Values" section of the Seattle Times. He helped start The Resurgence, a repository of missional theology resources.

Sourced

  • It is imperative that Christians be like Jesus, by living freely within the culture as missionaries who are as faithful to the Father and His gospel as Jesus was in His own time and place.
  • You have been told that God is a loving, gracious, merciful, kind, compassionate, wonderful, and good sky fairy who runs a day care in the sky and has a bucket of suckers for everyone because we're all good people. That is a lie... God looks down and says 'I hate you, you are my enemy, and I will crush you,' and we say that is deserved, right and just, and then God says 'Because of Jesus I will love you and forgive you.' This is a miracle.
  • I study the Bible all week, pray to the Lord, and then I speak from my heart. It's all about brutal honesty.
  • …the truths of Christianity are constant, unchanging, and meant for all people, times, and places. But the methods by which truth is articulated and practiced must be culturally appropriated, and therefore constantly translated …if doctrine is constant and practice is constantly changing, the result is living orthodoxy.
  • Everyone is sinning, so it's no longer rebellious to sin. You're just a conformist if you're drunk; and naked; driving around in a loud motorcycle; smoking cigarrettes; breaking commandments; getting pregnant out of wedlock. Everyone's done that. That's so tired!

Simple English

Mark Driscoll (born October 11, 1970) is an American pastor and author. He is the co-founder and Pastor for preaching of Mars Hill Church in Seattle, Washington. Driscoll also co-founded the Acts 29 Network Church Building Network, and has written articles for the "Faith and Values" section of the Seattle Times newspaper. He also helped start The Resurgence, a collection of missionary theology resources.[1]

He was born in Grand Forks, North Dakota and in 1989, he graduated from Highline High School in Burien, Washington, where he was the student body president and also wrote for the school newspaper. He earned a Bachelor's degree in communications from Washington State University with a minor in philosophy and holds a Master of Arts degree in exegetical theology from Western Seminary.

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