Maryland's 3rd congressional district: Wikis

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Maryland's 3rd congressional district
United States House of Representatives, Maryland District 3 map.png
Current Representative John Sarbanes (D)
Area 292.74 mi²
Distribution 98.4% urban, 1.3% rural
Population (2000) 662,062
Median income $52,906
Ethnicity 77.3% White, 16.3% Black, 3.2% Asian, 2.9% Hispanic, 0.3% Native American, 1.1% other
Occupation 15.7% blue collar, 71.7% white collar, 12.5% gray collar
Cook PVI D +6

Maryland's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district from the state of Maryland. It comprises portions of Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties, as well as a significant part of the independent city of Baltimore. The seat is currently represented by John Sarbanes, a Democrat.

The last three people to represent Maryland in the United States Senate were all representatives of the 3rd district. Those include the two current Maryland senators, Ben Cardin and Barbara Mikulski as well as retired senator Paul Sarbanes.

Some have attributed the district's odd shape to gerrymandering in order to favor Democratic candidates following the 2000 Census.[1]

Contents

Recent elections

Historical boundaries and composition

Maryland's 3rd district was one of the 50 or so districts that elected a representative to the 1st United States Congress. It also has the distinction of being one of the few congressional districts that once included areas not currently in the state they are in. The 3rd congressional district originally was composed of Prince George's County, Maryland and Anne Arundel County, Maryland.[2] At that point what is now Howard County, Maryland was in Anne Arundel County, and Prince George's County included the eastern half of the District of Columbia.

In 1792 the Maryland 3rd Congressional District was moved to include Montgomery County, Maryland and the eastern half of Frederick County, Maryland. The population was about 33,000.[3] However, the western portion of what is today Carroll County, Maryland was at this point in Frederick County, and the western half of the District of Columbia was in Montgomery County. This latter fact explains why the district lost population even though it in theory did not experience redistricting after the 1800 census. With the population of Georgetown, D. C. no longer in the district, its 1800 population was about 31,000.[4]. At this point the 3rd was Maryland's least populous district, barely having half the population of the Baltimore City and County 5th district, which in 1800 had just above 59,000 inhabitants.[5]

The boundaries remained the same after the 1810, 1820 and 1830 censuses. While in 1820 the district had about 36,000 inhabitants its population had risen to 53,622 in 1830.[6] With the formation of Carroll County in the 1830s as well as Maryland falling from 8 to 6 congressional seats, the boundaries of the 3rd Congressional District were drastically redrawn. The only area that remained in the 3rd Congressional District was the part of Carroll County that had been in Frederick County. The 3rd also included Baltimore County and the western half of the city of Baltimore. Its new population was 69,923, 24.5% of whom were black.[7]

In 1853 the 3rd district was redrawn again. The new district consisted of Baltimore County except for the northern and western parts of the county and about the eastern third of the City of Baltimore. The district now had a population of 95,729.[8] In the redistricting following the 1860 census, Maryland was reduced to five congressional districts. The 3rd was moved so that it contained the part of Baltimore that had not been in the 3rd before 1863. It now a population of 130,040.[9] In 1873 the 3rd district was moved again, to be the east side of Baltimore. It now had a population of 120,978.[10]

List of representatives

Name Took office Left office Party Notes/Events
1 Benjamin Contee March 4, 1789 March 3, 1791 Anti-Administration
2 William Pinkney March 4, 1791 November, 1791 Pro-Administration resigned
3 John Francis Mercer February 5, 1792 March 3, 1793 Anti-Administration
4 Uriah Forrest March 4, 1793 November 8, 1794 Pro-Administration resigned
5 Benjamin Edwards January 2, 1795 March 3, 1795 Pro-Administration
6 Jeremiah Crabb March 4, 1795 June 1, 1796 Federalist resigned
7 William Craik December 5, 1796 March 3, 1801 Federalist
8 Thomas Plater March 4, 1801 March 3, 1805 Federalist
9 Patrick Magruder March 4, 1805 March 3, 1807 Democratic-Republican
10 Philip Barton Key March 4, 1807 March 3, 1813 Federalist
11 Alexander Contee Hanson March 4, 1813 1816 Federalist resigned
12 George Peter October 7, 1816 March 3, 1819 Federalist
13 Henry Ridgely Warfield March 4, 1819 March 3, 1825 Federalist 1819-1823, Adams Federalist 1823-1825
14 George Peter March 4, 1825 March 3, 1827 Jackson
15 George Corbin Washington March 4, 1827 March 3, 1833 Adams 1827-1829, Anti-Jackson 1829-1833
17 James Turner March 4, 1833 March 3, 1837 Jackson
18 John Tolley Hood Worthington March 4, 1837 March 3, 1841 Democrat
19 James Wray Williams March 4, 1841 December 2, 1842 Democrat died
20 Charles S. Sewall January 2, 1843 March 3, 1843 Democrat
21 John Wethered March 4, 1843 March 3, 1845 Whig
22 Thomas Watkins Ligon March 4, 1845 March 3, 1849 Democrat
23 Edward Hammond March 4, 1849 March 3, 1853 Democrat
24 Joshua Van Sant March 4, 1853 March 3, 1855 Democrat
25 James Morrison Harris March 4, 1855 March 3, 1861 Know-Nothing
26 Cornelius Lawrence Ludlow Leary March 4, 1861 March 3, 1863 Unionist
27 Henry Winter Davis March 4, 1863 March 3, 1865 Conditional Unionist
28 Charles Edward Phelps March 4, 1865 March 3, 1867 Conditional Unionist
March 4, 1867 March 28, 1869 Conservative
29 Thomas Swann March 4, 1869 March 3, 1873 Democrat Redistricted to the 4th district
30 William James O'Brien March 4, 1873 March 3, 1877 Democrat
31 William Kimmel March 4, 1877 March 3, 1881 Democrat
32 Fetter Schrier Hoblitzell March 4, 1881 March 3, 1885 Democrat
33 William Hinson Cole March 4, 1885 July 8, 1886 Democrat died
34 Harry Welles Rusk November 2, 1886 March 3, 1897 Democrat
35 William Samuel Booze March 4, 1897 March 3, 1899 Republican
36 Frank Charles Wachter March 4, 1899 March 3, 1907 Democrat
37 Harry Benjamin Wolf March 4, 1907 March 3, 1909 Democrat
38 John Kronmiller March 4, 1909 March 3, 1911 Republican
39 George Konig March 4, 1911 May 31, 1913 Democrat died
40 Charles Pearce Coady March 4, 1913 March 3, 1921 Democrat
41 John Boynton Philip Clayton Hill March 4, 1921 March 3, 1927 Republican
42 Vincent Palmisano March 4, 1927 January 3, 1939 Democrat
43 Thomas D'Alesandro, Jr. January 3, 1939 May 16, 1947 Democrat resigned to become Mayor of Baltimore
44 Edward Garmatz July 15, 1947 January 3, 1973 Democrat
45 Paul Sarbanes January 3, 1973 January 3, 1977 Democrat Redistricted from the 4th district
46 Barbara Mikulski January 3, 1977 January 3, 1987 Democrat
47 Benjamin Cardin January 3, 1987 January 3, 2007 Democrat
48 John Sarbanes January 3, 2007 Incumbent Democrat

References

  1. ^ "Politics Makes Strange Bedfellows, Even Stranger Congressional Boundaries". Maryland Newsline, University of Maryland. 20 February 2004. http://www.newsline.umd.edu/politics/specialreports/elections04/fineline022004.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-06. 
  2. ^ Parson, Stanley B., William W. Beach and Dan Hermann. United States Congressional Districts, 1788-1841 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1978) p. 8-9
  3. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 42-43
  4. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 93-94
  5. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 94
  6. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts p. 234, 318
  7. ^ Parson, Stanley B., William W. Beach and Michael J. Durbin. United States Congressioal Districts, 1843-1883 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1986) p. 16
  8. ^ Parsosns. Con. Dis. 1843-1883 p. 64
  9. ^ Parsons. Con. Dis. 1843-1883 p. 115
  10. ^ Parsons. Con. Dis. 1843-1883 p. 177

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