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Mass rape of German women by Soviet Red Army refers to the rape of up to two million German women during the last six months of World War Two, around 100,000 of them in Berlin, based on surging abortion rates in the following months and contemporary hospital reports.[1][2][3] 240,000 women died as a result. [4][5] Antony Beevor describes it as the "greatest phenomenon of mass rape in history". [6] According to Natalya Gesse, a close friend of the Soviet scientist Andrei Sakharov "the Russian soldiers were raping every German female from eight to eighty." [7] After the summer of 1945, Soviet soldiers caught raping civilians were usually punished to some degree, ranging from arrest to execution.[8] The rapes continued, however, until the winter of 1947–48, when Soviet occupation authorities finally confined Soviet troops to strictly guarded posts and camps,“[9] completely separating them from the residential population in the Soviet zone of Germany.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/berlin_01.shtml
  2. ^ Hanna Schissler The Miracle Years: A Cultural History of West Germany, 1949-1968 [1]
  3. ^ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=106687768
  4. ^ Helke Sander/Barbara Johr: BeFreier und Befreite, Fischer, Frankfurt 2005
  5. ^ Seidler/Zayas: Kriegsverbrechen in Europa und im Nahen Osten im 20. Jahrhundert, Mittler, Hamburg Berlin Bonn 2002
  6. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/05/16/1052885399546.html
  7. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2002/may/01/news.features11
  8. ^ Norman M. Naimark. The Russians in Germany: A History of the Soviet Zone of Occupation, 1945-1949. Cambridge: Belknap, 1995 p. 92 ISBN 0-674-78405-7
  9. ^ Naimark. The Russians in Germany, p. 79







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