Massachusetts's 1st congressional district: Wikis

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Massachusetts's 1st congressional district
Ma01 109.gif
Current Representative John Olver (D)
Area 3,101.14 mi²
Population (2000) 634,479
Median income $52,561
Ethnicity 88.8% White, 1.9% Black, 1.7% Asian, 6.3% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 1.1% other
Occupation 23.8% blue collar, 59.7% white collar, 16.4% gray collar
Cook PVI D + 14

Massachusetts's first congressional district is in western and central Massachusetts. The largest Massachusetts district in area, it covers about one-third of the state and is more rural than the rest. It has the state's highest point, Mount Greylock. This District also includes the notable cities of West Springfield, Pittsfield, Holyoke, Westfield, Fitchburg ,and Leominster.

John Olver, a Democrat from Amherst, has represented the district since June 1991.

Contents

Cities and towns currently in the district

The district contains all of Berkshire County and Franklin County as well the following towns and cities:

In Hampden County:

Blandford, Chester, Granville, Holyoke, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Tolland, Westfield, West Springfield.

In Hampshire County:

Amherst, Belchertown, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Granby, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Pelham, Plainfield, Southampton, Ware, Westhampton, Williamsburg, Worthington.

In Middlesex County:

Ashby, Pepperell, Townsend.

In Worcester County:

Ashburnham, Athol, Barre, Fitchburg, Gardner, Hardwick, Hubbardston, Leominster, Lunenburg, New Braintree, Oakham, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Sterling, Templeton, West Brookfield, Westminster, Winchendon.

History

When the First District was originally created it covered part of eastern Massachusetts, generally south of Boston.

List of representatives

Representative Party Years ↑ District home Note
Fisher Ames Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 – March 3, 1793 Dedham
Fisher Ames Pro-Administration General ticket,
March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795
Dedham
Samuel Dexter Pro-Administration Lunenburg
Benjamin Goodhue Pro-Administration Salem Redistricted to 10th district
Samuel Holten Anti-Administration Danvers
Theodore Sedgwick Federalist March 4, 1795 – June, 1796 Stockbridge Redistricted from 2nd district, Resigned
Vacant June 1796 – January 27, 1797
Thomson J. Skinner Democratic-Republican January 27, 1797 – March 3, 1799
Theodore Sedgwick Federalist March 4, 1799 – March 3, 1801 Stockbridge Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1799-1801
John Bacon Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 – March 3, 1803 Stockbridge
William Eustis Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1805 Redistricted from 8th district, Lost reelection
Josiah Quincy III Federalist March 4, 1805 – March 3, 1813 Boston
Artemas Ward, Jr. Federalist March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1817 Charlestown
Jonathan Mason Federalist March 4, 1813 – May 15, 1820 Resigned to pursue law practice
Vacant May 15, 1820 – November 6, 1820
Benjamin Gorham Democratic-Republican November 6, 1820 – March 3, 1823 Charlestown
Daniel Webster Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825 Boston
Adams March 4, 1825 – May 30, 1827 Resigned to become U.S. Senator
Vacant May 30, 1827 – July 23, 1827
Benjamin Gorham Adams July 23, 1827 – March 3, 1829 Charlestown
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 – May 30, 1831
Nathan Appleton Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1831 – March 3, 1833 Lowell Retired
Benjamin Gorham Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1835 Charlestown
Abbott Lawrence Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 – March 3, 1837
Richard Fletcher Whig March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1839 Boston Retired
Abbott Lawrence Whig March 4, 1839 – September 18, 1840 Resigned
Vacant September 18, 1840 – November 9, 1840
Robert C. Winthrop Whig November 9, 1840 – May 25, 1842 Boston Resigned
Vacant May 25, 1842 – June 9, 1842
Nathan Appleton Whig June 9, 1842 – September 28, 1842 Lowell Resigned
Vacant September 28, 1842 – November 29, 1842
Robert C. Winthrop Whig November 29, 1842 – July 30, 1850 Boston Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1847-1849, Resigned to become U.S. Senator
Vacant July 30, 1850 – August 22, 1850
Samuel A. Eliot Whig August 22, 1850 – March 3, 1851 Boston Retired
William Appleton Whig March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1853 Brookfield Redistricted to 5th district
Zeno Scudder Whig March 4, 1853 – March 4, 1854 Osterville Redistricted from 10th district
Retired because of injury
Vacant March 4, 1854 – April 17, 1854
Thomas D. Eliot Whig April 17, 1854 – March 3, 1855 New Bedford Retired
Robert B. Hall American (Know Nothing) March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1857 Plymouth
Republican March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859
Thomas D. Eliot Republican March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1869 New Bedford Retired
James Buffinton Republican March 4, 1869 – March 7, 1875 Fall River Died
Vacant March 7, 1875 – November 2, 1875
William W. Crapo Republican November 2, 1875 – March 3, 1883 New Bedford Retired
Robert T. Davis Republican March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1889 Fall River Retired
Charles S. Randall Republican March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1893 New Bedford Redistricted to 13th district
Ashley B. Wright Republican March 4, 1893 – August 14, 1897 Hinsdale Died
Vacant August 14, 1897 – November 2, 1897
George P. Lawrence Republican November 2, 1897 – March 3, 1913 North Adams Retired
Allen T. Treadway Republican March 4, 1913 – January 3, 1945 Stockbridge Retired
John W. Heselton Republican January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1959 Deerfield Retired
Silvio O. Conte Republican January 3, 1959 – February 8, 1991 Pittsfield Died
Vacant February 8, 1991 – June 4, 1991
John Olver Democratic June 4, 1991 – Present Amherst Incumbent
Representative Party Years ↑ District home Note

Recent election results

2002 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver 137,841 67.56
Republican Matthew Kinnaman 66,061 32.40
Write-in 117 0.06
Majority 71,780 35.18
Turnout 204,019
Democratic hold Swing
2004 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver 229,465 99.02 + 31.46
Write-in 2,282 0.98 + 0.92
Majority 227,183 98.04 + 62.86
Turnout 231,747
Democratic hold Swing
2006 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver 158,035 76% {{{change}}}
Unenrolled challenger William H. Szych 49,123 24% {{{change}}}
Socialist Eric Chester <253 <1%
Democratic hold Swing
2008 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver {{{change}}}
Democratic Robert Feuer {{{change}}}
Republican Nathan Bech {{{change}}}

References

External links

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