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The Master's College
Established 1927
Type Private
President Dr. John F. MacArthur
Faculty 113
Students 1,198
Undergraduates 952 (+154 degree completion)
Postgraduates 92 (+375 seminary)
Location Santa Clarita, California, United States
Campus Suburban (LA County)
Colors Gold, Navy Blue
Mascot Mustang
Athletics 10 Varsity Teams
Affiliations Golden State Athletic Conference
Website masters.edu

The Master's College is a non-denominational, conservative Christian liberal arts college located in Santa Clarita, California, USA.

Contents

History

The Master's College was founded as Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary on May 25, 1927 to meet the need for a fundamentalist Baptist school on the West Coast. The intention was to provide a biblical and Christ-centered education consistent with those doctrines of the historic Christian faith.

Dr. William A. Matthews, pastor of Memorial Baptist Church of Los Angeles, became the founder and first president. The seminary was extended an invitation to be temporarily housed at Calvary Baptist Church in the Los Angeles area. Several more moves followed until the seminary moved onto its own property in Los Angeles in 1942.

Dr. Mathews died at his home on August 18, 1943. He was succeeded by presidents C. Gordon Evanson, Floyd Burton Boice, and Henry C. Thiessen. In 1946, the seminary became a graduate-level school and initiated a separate undergraduate and liberal arts program. Following Dr. Thiessen's death in 1947, Dr. Herbert V. Hotchkiss and Dr. Milton E. Fish, a Harvard graduate, strengthened the school scholastically and spiritually.

August 14, 1959 marked a change, as Dr. John R. Dunkin became president, succeeding Dr. Carl M. Sweazy, who returned to full-time evangelism. The new president continued the scriptural position of the school’s leadership.

TMC campus

Almost a year later, the school acquired the Happy Jack Dude Ranch in the town of Newhall, approximately forty miles north of Los Angeles. It comprised twenty-seven acres with a tree-shaded nucleus of seven buildings, some of which could be remodeled for college use. By May 1961, the school occupied the main portion of the new campus. The foreman’s house became King Hall, which now houses the Student Life and Campus Activities offices. H. Vider Hall, which now includes offices for several departments, was once used as a dorm for students, and before that a barracks for the “dudes” of the ranch.

The R. L. Powell Library, named after a faithful trustee of the school, became the first new building, dedicated in 1961. Henry Vider supervised the construction of Rutherford Hall, what was then both the dining hall and administration building. In February 1965, Hotchkiss Hall, named after faculty member Dr. Herbert V. Hotchkiss, became the first new student dormitory.

Under Dr. Dunkin’s leadership, the college pursued accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Expansion of the college, including construction of Reese Academic Center, a new science and lecture hall, helped pave the way. To facilitate accreditation of the undergraduate program, the seminary moved to Tacoma, Washington in 1974, resulting in the founding of Northwest Baptist Seminary. Accreditation was granted in 1975. .

After twenty-five years of service Dr. Dunkin stepped down as president to become chancellor, and was appointed President Emeritus in 1989. The John R. Dunkin Student Center, a two-story complex overlooking Placerita Canyon, serves as a reminder of his dedication..

In May 1985, John MacArthur became the next president of the college, in addition to his responsibilities as pastor-teacher at Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California and Bible expositor on the “Grace to You” radio broadcast. The name of the school was changed to The Master’s College. With the exposure of the college through MacArthur’s radio ministry, the school became one of the fastest growing Christian colleges in America.

The Master's Seminary

Initial planning for additional graduate programs for students at the College began soon after MacArthur became president. The Master’s Seminary started in 1986 with the specific goal of producing Bible expositors. Today, under the leadership of senior vice president Dr. Richard L. Mayhue, the seminary has over three hundred students enrolled and is located 15 miles (24 km) away on the grounds of Grace Community Church. The seminary is steeped in the tradition of conservative, premillennial Dispensationalism.

Academic programs

The Master's College offers comprehensive academic undergraduate programs in 13 major fields of study with 54 distinctive emphases. A number of cooperative study programs provide students with opportunities for off-campus learning experiences. All undergraduate academic majors culminate with a baccalaureate degree, except for the one-year Master's Institute program and the teacher credential program.

Accreditation & Memberships

The Master's College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.

Membership is maintained in:

  • The Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities
  • The California Council for Teacher Education
  • The National Association of College Admissions Counselors
  • The Pacific Coast Association of Collegiate Registrars
  • The Association of Christian Schools International
  • The Western College Association
  • The Association on Higher Education and Disability.
  • The National Association of Schools of Music

The Master's College is one of approximately 105 members of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities.

Athletics

Men's and women's basketball, soccer, baseball, cross-country, golf, tennis and volleyball compete in Division I of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), winning regional championships and gaining national recognition.

Curtis Lewis, head coach of the women's soccer team, won the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year award in 2008.

Jerry Owens is a professional baseball player from Master's College. He was named the Small College All-American Outfielder for 2003, before being selected by the Montreal Expos in the 2nd Round (57th overall) of the 2003 amateur entry draft. The outfielder played for the Chicago White Sox from 2006 to 2009, and had 32 stolen bases in 2007. He later became the property of the Seattle Mariners organization.

Mike Penberthy was a professional basketball player from Master's College. Penberthy was not drafted by an NBA team but did play for the Los Angeles Lakers for two years (2000-01 to 2001-02). Penberthy was part of the Lakers' 2000-01 championship team.

Erin Perperoglou (formerly Buescher) is a professional basketball player from Master's College. She was drafted in the 2nd round of the 2001 WNBA Draft as the No. 23 pick. She won a WNBA championship in 2005 with the Sacramento Monarchs. She won the 2006 WNBA Most Improved Player Award.

Awards and Rankings

  • In the 2006-07 edition of U.S. News & World Report of "America’s Best Colleges", The Master’s College is ranked second (2nd) in the West as Best Comprehensive Colleges—Bachelor’s.[1]
  • In the 2008 edition of U.S. News & World Report of “America’s Best Colleges”, The Master’s College has been ranked second (2nd) in the West as one of America’s Best Colleges in the category of Best Comprehensive Baccalaureate Colleges. This marks the eighth year in a row that The Master’s College was listed in the top tier of Western Region Baccalaureate Colleges.[2]
    • The Master’s College is also cited as one of the best values, ranking 4th in the category of “Great Schools, Great Prices.” [3]
  • Curtis Lewis, head coach of the women's soccer team, won the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year award in 2008.

Student life

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Dorms

The campus provides dorms for the students. Each room is individually furnished and has heating and air conditioning units, except for Waldock. The men's dorms include Slight, Waldock, Hotchkiss East, and the first floor of C.W. Smith Hall. The women's dorms include Dixon, Sweazy, Hotchkiss West and the top two floors of C.W. Smith Hall. It is important to note that dorms are not coed.

  • C.W. Smith - C.W. Smith Hall is the newest dormitory, named after the long-time Bible department teacher who died in 2001. Once construction was completed in Spring 2003, it was the only three-story building on campus. It has six wings with two Resident Director apartments. The women live on the second and third floors while the men live on the first. Each dorm room holds two students. There is a student lounge along with an elevator.
  • Dixon - Frank R. Dixon Hall is a two story women's dorm where each apartment houses two students.
  • Hotchkiss - Herbert V. Hotchkiss Hall contains two stories of men and women dorm halls, separated by the student lounge containing ping pong, foosball, and pool tables.
  • Slight - Ralph S. Slight Hall is a two-story men's dorm. Each of the twenty apartments, which consists of a main living room/bedroom, a smaller bedroom, and a full bathroom, can hold up to six students. Slight is the only dorm that does not have a student lounge.
  • Sweazy - Carl M. Sweazy Hall is a two story women's dorm that houses two students in each room. There is a student lounge on the first floor at the main entrance.
  • Waldock - Frederick W. Waldock Hall is a two story men's dorm with two student lounges, one positioned on each floor. Each room accommodates two students. Unlike the other dorms that have individual heating and air conditioning, Waldock's temperature is run by a central heating device.

Chapel

TMC has chapel three times a week, which occurs every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. It opens with worship, followed by a guest speaker or preacher. It mainly focuses on encouraging the students to keep their lives committed to Jesus Christ. Some chapel meetings may be divided among dorms while other times may be split by gender or degree (Dorm Chapel and Split Chapel, respectively). Students are only allowed a maximum of six chapel misses per semester. You can subscribe to the Chapel podcast, which records and publishes select chapel meetings for free.

Music Department

See also

References

External links


Template:Infobox University The Master's College is a non-denominational, conservative Christian liberal arts college located in Santa Clarita, California, USA.

Contents

History

The Master's College was founded as Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary on May 25, 1927 to meet the need for a fundamentalist Baptist school on the West Coast. The intention was to provide a biblical and Christ-centered education consistent with those doctrines of the historic Christian faith.

Dr. William A. Matthews, pastor of Memorial Baptist Church of Los Angeles, became the founder and first president. The seminary was extended an invitation to be temporarily housed at Calvary Baptist Church in the Los Angeles area. Several more moves followed until the seminary moved onto its own property in Los Angeles in 1942.

Dr. Mathews died at his home on August 18, 1943. He was succeeded by presidents C. Gordon Evanson, Floyd Burton Boice, and Henry C. Thiessen. In 1946, the seminary became a graduate-level school and initiated a separate undergraduate and liberal arts program. Following Dr. Thiessen's death in 1947, Dr. Herbert V. Hotchkiss and Dr. Milton E. Fish, a Harvard graduate, strengthened the school scholastically and spiritually.

August 14, 1959 marked a change, as Dr. John R. Dunkin became president, succeeding Dr. Carl M. Sweazy, who returned to full-time evangelism. The new president continued the scriptural position of the school’s leadership.


Almost a year later, the school acquired the Happy Jack Dude Ranch in the town of Newhall, approximately forty miles north of Los Angeles. It comprised twenty-seven acres with a tree-shaded nucleus of seven buildings, some of which could be remodeled for college use. By May 1961, the school occupied the main portion of the new campus. The foreman’s house became King Hall, which now houses the Student Life and Campus Activities offices. H. Vider Hall, which now includes offices for several departments, was once used as a dorm for students, and before that a barracks for the “dudes” of the ranch.

The R. L. Powell Library, named after a faithful trustee of the school, became the first new building, dedicated in 1961. Henry Vider supervised the construction of Rutherford Hall, what was then both the dining hall and administration building. In February 1965, Hotchkiss Hall, named after faculty member Dr. Herbert V. Hotchkiss, became the first new student dormitory.

Under Dr. Dunkin’s leadership, the college pursued accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Expansion of the college, including construction of Reese Academic Center, a new science and lecture hall, helped pave the way. To facilitate accreditation of the undergraduate program, the seminary moved to Tacoma, Washington in 1974, resulting in the founding of Northwest Baptist Seminary. Accreditation was granted in 1975. .

After twenty-five years of service Dr. Dunkin stepped down as president to become chancellor, and was appointed President Emeritus in 1989. The John R. Dunkin Student Center, a two-story complex overlooking Placerita Canyon, serves as a reminder of his dedication..

In May 1985, Dr. John MacArthur became the next president of the college, in addition to his responsibilities as pastor-teacher at Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California and Bible expositor on the “Grace to You” radio broadcast. The name of the school was changed to The Master’s College. With the exposure of the college through Dr. MacArthur’s radio ministry, the school became one of the fastest growing Christian colleges in America.

The Master's Seminary

Initial planning for additional graduate programs for students at the College began soon after MacArthur became president. The Master’s Seminary started in 1986 with the specific goal of producing Bible expositors. Today, under the leadership of senior vice president Dr. Richard L. Mayhue, the seminary has over three hundred students enrolled and is located 15 miles (24 km) away on the grounds of Grace Community Church.

Academic Programs

The Master's College offers comprehensive academic undergraduate programs in 13 major fields of study with 54 distinctive emphases. A number of cooperative study programs provide students with opportunities for off-campus learning experiences. All undergraduate academic majors culminate with a baccalaureate degree, except for the one-year Master's Institute program and the teacher credential program.

Accreditation & Memberships

The Master's College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.

Membership is maintained in:

  • The Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities
  • The California Council for Teacher Education
  • The National Association of College Admissions Counselors
  • The Pacific Coast Association of Collegiate Registrars
  • The Association of Christian Schools International
  • The Western College Association
  • The Association on Higher Education and Disability.
  • The National Association of Schools of Music

The Master's College is one of approximately 105 members of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities.

Athletics

Men's and women's basketball, soccer, baseball, cross-country, golf, tennis and volleyball compete in Division I of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), winning regional championships and gaining national recognition.

Curtis Lewis, head coach of the women's soccer team, won the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year award in 2008.

Mike Penberthy was a professional basketball player from Master's College. Penberthy was not drafted by an NBA team but did play for the Los Angeles Lakers for two years (2000-01 to 2001-02). Penberthy was part of the Lakers' 2000-01 championship team.

Awards and Rankings

  • In the 2006-07 edition of U.S. News & World Report of "America’s Best Colleges", The Master’s College is ranked second (2nd) in the West as Best Comprehensive Colleges—Bachelor’s.[1]
  • In the 2008 edition of U.S. News & World Report of “America’s Best Colleges”, The Master’s College has been ranked second (2nd) in the West as one of America’s Best Colleges in the category of Best Comprehensive Baccalaureate Colleges. This marks the eighth year in a row that The Master’s College was listed in the top tier of Western Region Baccalaureate Colleges.[2]
    • The Master’s College is also cited as one of the best values, ranking 4th in the category of “Great Schools, Great Prices.” [3]
  • Curtis Lewis, head coach of the women's soccer team, won the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year award in 2008.

Student Life

Dorms

The campus provides dorms for the students. Each room is individually furnished and has heating and air conditioning units, except for Waldock. The men's dorms include Slight, Hotchkiss East, and the first two floors of C.W. Smith Hall. The women's dorms include Waldock, Dixon, Sweazy, Hotchkiss West and the third floor of C.W. Smith Hall. It is important to note that dorms are not coed.

  • C.W. Smith - C.W. Smith Hall is the newest dormitory. Once construction was completed in Spring 2003, it was the only three-story building on campus. It has six wings with two Resident Director apartments. The women live on the third floor while the men live on the first and second. Each dorm room holds two students. There is a student lounge along with an elevator.
  • Dixon - Frank R. Dixon Hall is a two story women's dorm where each apartment houses two students.
  • Hotchkiss - Herbert V. Hotchkiss Hall contains two stories of men and women dorm halls, separated by the student lounge containing ping pong, foosball, and pool tables.
  • Slight - Ralph S. Slight Hall is a two-story men's dorm. Each of the twenty apartments, which consists of a main living room/bedroom, a smaller bedroom, and a full bathroom, can hold up to six students. Slight is the only dorm that does not have a student lounge.
  • Sweazy - Carl M. Sweazy Hall is a two story women's dorm that houses two students in each room. There is a student lounge on the first floor at the main entrance.
  • Waldock - Frederick W. Waldock Hall is a two story women's dorm with two student lounges, one positioned on each floor. Each room accommodates two students. Unlike the other dorms that have individual heating and air conditioning, Waldock's temperature is run by a central heating device. Beginning during the 2009-2010 academic year, Waldock will revert back to its original status as a men's dormitory.

Chapel

TMC has chapel three times a week, which occurs every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. It opens with worship, followed by a guest speaker or preacher. It mainly focuses on encouraging the students to keep their lives committed to Jesus Christ. Some chapel meetings may be divided among dorms while other times may be split by gender (Dorm Chapel and Split Chapel, respectively). Students are only allowed a maximum of six chapel misses per semester. You can subscribe to the Chapel podcast, which records and publishes select chapel meetings for free.

References

See also

External links


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